Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi

    I'm going to go to Uni next year, providing I don't reasonably **** up my A levels , to do a chemistry masters.

    Just wondering, does it get any harder than at A2 level?, as when I look at some of the concepts that some uni chem students talk about, it doesn't seem that much different from A2, only with a different element/molecule/catalyst.
    It'd be nice to have a really challenging chemistry course that I could apply my quite good maths skill to and explanatory skills, additional to the practical things.

    I've asked the uni I'm off to if they can include some maths modules within it but I haven't heard back from them. I'm so confused on what I wanna do in the future, but I need something challenging or I'll just get complacent and lazy

    If it does get more challenging, how? Does it require more intense understanding (which I want) or is there simply more things to memorize?
    Help
    thanks
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I suppose it depends how you see chemistry. Personally, I find physical chemistry quite hard to grasp because past simple maths I'm not that great with numbers but organic is perfectly fine. Provided you can memorise fundamentals as you go along with your chemistry course it doesn't get much harder.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    yes
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    2nd and 3rd year are challenging but it helps a lot if you listen in the 1st year, unlike me. Organic chemistry is all about understanding and applying, not rote learning like A Level. Inorganic and Physical require more fact learning but don't underestimate them - thorough answers are required in exams to gain good marks.

    At Nottingham, we had 2 math modules in the first year - one for people who didn't do an A Level in maths and others who did. I did the latter and it was quite complex stuff, like imaginary numbers, extended differentiation/integration methods, matrices etc. Some of it was 3rd year engineering stuff...
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    It does get more challenging, especially when you do all the theory that is based on Quantum physics. There is a lot of physics and maths concepts at uni.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I assume it would, or hence it wouldn't be university level...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thegodofgod)
    I assume it would, or hence it wouldn't be university level...
    I didn't find a big transition between second and third year. I'd even go as far as saying that third year has been easier because after doing a lot of retrosynthesis reactions aren't so complicated now whereas last year they were like "Reactions?! WTF".
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Irrelevance)
    I didn't find a big transition between second and third year. I'd even go as far as saying that third year has been easier because after doing a lot of retrosynthesis reactions aren't so complicated now whereas last year they were like "Reactions?! WTF".
    But surely they must have become easier because you did a lot of practice / learned them well?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thegodofgod)
    But surely they must have become easier because you did a lot of practice / learned them well?
    I wouldn't go that far What made it easier I guess was the level of exposure. First year to second year was a massive jump because it went from 0 chemistry to **** loads of organic, physical and bioinorganic. Since the chemistry load has been similar this year, it's not as much of a shock.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    well I got a huge shock when I went to university. I found chemistry A level fairly straight forward, but at uni (especially physical chem) gets very hard indeed.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: April 11, 2011
Poll
Are you going to a festival?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.