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    Great that it was ditched.
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    Most people who I know who recieve it, don't 'waste it on alcohol'. Myself included.
    And I'm not a chav, or a scrounger.

    Walk in somebody elses shoes before you criticise and make judgements, yeah? You should just think yourself lucky that you are not entitled, IMO, because I think everybody who is would love not to be
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    This has been asked so many times, use the search function.
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    it is inevitable that some people will abuse the money they receive by spending it on utter crap. there are people who actually need it though, so it is unfair to scrap it altogether for those who are using it on school related matters.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Maybe there could be a system that's a little bit like a loan, but not a loan exactly, because they wouldn't have to pay back any money they've actually been given.

    Each month the students would be given however much money to cover the next month. Lets say £30 a week so £120 a month. At the end of the month they have to provide receipts or other evidence for what they spent it on. For small amounts their word would be taken, so it's not overly strict. Whatever money is left unaccounted for is taken out of the next months payment, as it's assumed they still have that money left over.

    So the idea is they're given money upfront to pay for their education, but it means they can't just spend it on whatever they want.
    This sounds like one of the best ideas so far however you still have to be carefull of the college systems. I know If i missed a day at college or turned up for a lesson 5 min late because of the bus i would not get ema for the following week meaning that i'd be screwed on getting into college.

    However with this idea you have presented is better than most the only down side that might come of it is that the students might lose bus tickets and if you have to use different services that could be a lot of tickets that the office would have to process in time for you to be able to be allocated your next months money. Say its 20 tickets if they buy single which might be cheaper in some cases for over 500 students that is a lot of work that the college offices will never do.
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    (Original post by leeeasa)
    Im in my first year of Sixthform and i've came to realise EMA is one of those things that are mostly an absoloute waste because about basically every single person i know that recieves it apart from one just wastes it in alcohol, not what its aimed for. Its just given to chavs who cant be arsed getting a part time job and would rather scrounge off the government. Im glad EMA is being scrapped as it means that it can go towards better things such as funding our education system, NHS etc

    People shouldn't have to be 'bribed' to go onto Further Education, they should want to in order to better themselves and increase their chances of getting a well paid job. I voiced these opinions once in sixthform wich resulted in being verbally abused by a 5''2 ****gy chav and being called a 'stuck up snob'.
    Peoples opinions on EMA?
    I was a young carer as a teen to my mother and sister, and under going abuse from my father, bullying at school, and mental health problems/dyspraxia. I didn't get the chance to work so EMA was my ticket to uni. I saved it - and now, that I live on £5 a week from the government, I have money to afford to get my hair cut, buy shoes when my old ones wear thin, buy cleaning products for my flat, textbooks and the occasional day out.

    Still think we're all chavs/scroungers who can't be bothered? :rolleyes:
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    The thing is, it's easy to say it's a huge waste of money, but peoples situations will always be different and there will always be those students who do genuinely need a bit of extra help.
    There will always be people like myself who have pretty unfortuate circumstances, mine involve a disabled parent and all of us living in a siblings house, and so if I wasn't getting EMA, I would have stayed at the shocking sixth form near my house and not been able to afford textbooks (my old school didn't have a library either)
    EMA means that I have been able to move to a much better sixth form. I've been on trips, something I never did during my GCSE's, been able to get textbooks, buy myself a cheap desk so I have somewhere to work, etc. etc. I've just recently managed to get a job after seven months of solid searching, and so can now start to save up a bit. It can be horribly misused, and it makes me cringe to see that, but at the same time, there are people who would not be in higher education/doing even half as well without it.
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    I love how everyone who receives EMA is automatically a 'chav' or 'scrounger' :rolleyes:

    Im not a chav, im going to college for a decent career so when I have children I can support them financially and they wont have to spend each day wondering if they will be made homeless because they cant afford the mortgage
    I'm used to the abuse though, there are a lot of rich people in my college that get as much money as they want off their parents.

    Sure, it could be a better system but without it people like me would have no chance of getting a decent job and would be stuck in a vicious circle.

    People that dont need EMA moan they dont get it, but they dont realise that people that need it would love to switch places
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    It is totally unfair to scrap it completely, although I agree that it should be made a means-tested benefit. In my case, I come from a low income family and travel quite a distance to go to a grammar school, when I hit 16 I have to pay full price train fairs so unless I can find a job (which I have been fervently trying to do for the past six months) my family will find it very hard to pay for me to attend.

    On the other, I appreciate that there are people who do not deserve it but it's just typical of the Conservatives to scrap a benefit such as this....
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    (Original post by Smilingsam)
    This sounds like one of the best ideas so far however you still have to be carefull of the college systems. I know If i missed a day at college or turned up for a lesson 5 min late because of the bus i would not get ema for the following week meaning that i'd be screwed on getting into college.

    However with this idea you have presented is better than most the only down side that might come of it is that the students might lose bus tickets and if you have to use different services that could be a lot of tickets that the office would have to process in time for you to be able to be allocated your next months money. Say its 20 tickets if they buy single which might be cheaper in some cases for over 500 students that is a lot of work that the college offices will never do.
    Yeah one problem with it is that the admin costs could actually outweigh the savings you get from not giving out money to students who don't need it.
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    I have a parttime job as well as getting EMA. I usually put half away immediately into savings because I know when I get to uni my parents aren't in such a supportive situation financially and I don't think it's fair asking them for their money they work hard to earn.

    I live in a rural area, where you have to travel miles to get TO public transport, so my EMA has been spent on driving lessons, fuel, and half my tax and insurance since I share the car with my parents, as well as stationary, books, meals and clothing. Yes, a little bit goes to socialising, but I work too. I think it would be better in some respects to get vouchers so you can't abuse the money, but then you can't put some aside for the uni fund. Not it's main purpose but the most common in my bunch of friends.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Yeah one problem with it is that the admin costs could actually outweigh the savings you get from not giving out money to students who don't need it.
    The goverment will most probably take this as there new method they seem to give out items with higher expected cost than return cost.
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    (Original post by leeeasa)
    THANK YOU PEOPLE!
    gosh finally people who agree

    i come from quite a middle class family, we're comfortable but my parents dont exactly spend lavish amounts of money on me all the time, so to pay for my socialising e.g. nights out, designer handbags, monthly hair extensions, festivals, weekends away etc i had to get a job, wich i work very hard at (also studying full time at sixtform) EMA just discourages people from trying to get a job, absolute waste of money and hopefully when its gone it will encourage people to try and get jobs instead of getting money for nothing
    I feel for you, it must be hard not receiving those designer handbags all the time. Make sure you have a hard word with your parents. People like you make me cringe because you are so self centered you don't realise how other people have completly different circumstances. Some people can't afford to put food in their mouths and all your bothered about is your festivals.

    I personally like the EMA system. It does have some flaws but it has addressed why working class people don't always have the same opportunities as others. Some posts such as 'its paying people to go' are true. EMA provides that little bit extra what some people cannot afford.
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    What's wrong with book vouchers or a bus card instead distributd by the school rather than cash in hand? Would be a lot fairer imo
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    I think it's a poorly executed system that is generally being wasted. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for helping out people who are genuinely finding life difficult and without support require full-time jobs to sustain themselves, but I'm sure I saw figures that as much as 8/10 college students get EMA. I think it's very selfish and irresponsible that people are protesting for EMA if they know full well they can survive without it with just a part-time job, and it dilutes the message from people who are protesting to retain it because they literally depend on that source of income to feed themselves.

    One thing that a lot of people seem to forget as well is that part-time work between the ages of 16 - 18 is valuable experience that is being lost when people use EMA payments to support themselves through College, rather than getting a part-time job for that. Not only does EMA pay people not to work which is detrimental to the economy in real-time, it stimulates a generation of young adults who don't have a strong enough CV to find work during or after University, which is detrimental to the economy in a longer term.

    Finally, working between the ages of 16-18 helps students to gain a bit of experience at juggling education and work. There's no EMA at University besides a maintenance loan that is expended on rent. So, even if it may boost overall a-level results slightly and encourages more people into college education, it also gears those who depended on EMA up for a University life of employment difficulties and poor financial management at a time when you're arguably at your poorest

    I would be happy to see it go, but I really think there needs to be more money invested in assessing and targeting people who really need support; support which comes in the form of food, transport and revision material vouchers and more opportunities to work part-time.
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    (Original post by foldingstars45)
    Most people who I know who recieve it, don't 'waste it on alcohol'. Myself included.
    And I'm not a chav, or a scrounger.

    Walk in somebody elses shoes before you criticise and make judgements, yeah? You should just think yourself lucky that you are not entitled, IMO, because I think everybody who is would love not to be
    The thing is I have been in your shoes and I have seen how easily abused it is. Abused in the sense that I didn't believe certain people should have been getting it and it should be more directed to people who actually succeed and who's family earn under a certain thresh hold.

    I saw teachers just sign the EMA papers even though people weren't doing well and in my honest opinion weren't trying at-all to do their work. Money simply can't simply be the motivation for education, because that is what it has become with the EMA system.

    If they could just funnel the EMA system to provide for free public transport to get to and from college, then I would support that.

    If they would give vouchers to buy stationary/books from certain retailers, I would support that.

    But if you want money to go out and spend on cloths, drink, partying, drugs or anything like that, earn the money with a job. I was doing two courses and I managed to get on alright. Though I will admit the EMA money helped a lot in regards to helping me and my sister have money in our pockets. So I'm not fully blasting EMA here.

    I like what the Tories are currently doing, where only the people who most need help with funding will get the money. But I would equally like to see free transportation to and from college for students. I know what it is like not having much money in your pocket, I've been in that situation which is why I had 2 jobs and 3 at my peak.
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    I disagreee. Personally, I don't even spend my EMA, I've been saving up for university the moment I got it. It's going to be really helpful for me, and it means I won't have to get a job (EMA is also the reason I quit my job, so I could focus on my work). My parents aren't that well off, so it's really helpful when the future comes, which is preety soon. I think it's unfair, that all the generations before us managed to get all this support, and now it if feels like we're literally been left to the gutter on our own. I do take into account everyone spends it differently, but I'm not sure what this is going to mean for people who acutally do deserve it. :/
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    (Original post by JonathanNorth)
    I saw teachers just sign the EMA papers even though people weren't doing well and in my honest opinion weren't trying at-all to do their work.
    Then surely that is the teachers / sixth forms / colleges fault for not sticking to the EMA rules then?

    And as you have admitted that the sixth forms / colleges are partly to blame for why EMA has been abused by some people, then surely you must share my concern about those very places having overall control of the money?

    (Original post by JSLCampbell)
    I think it's a poorly executed system that is generally being wasted. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for helping out people who are genuinely finding life difficult and without support require full-time jobs to sustain themselves, but I'm sure I saw figures that as much as 8/10 college students get EMA. I think it's very selfish and irresponsible that people are protesting for EMA if they know full well they can survive without it with just a part-time job, and it dilutes the message from people who are protesting to retain it because they literally depend on that source of income to feed themselves.

    One thing that a lot of people seem to forget as well is that part-time work between the ages of 16 - 18 is valuable experience that is being lost when people use EMA payments to support themselves through College, rather than getting a part-time job for that. Not only does EMA pay people not to work which is detrimental to the economy in real-time, it stimulates a generation of young adults who don't have a strong enough CV to find work during or after University, which is detrimental to the economy in a longer term.

    Finally, working between the ages of 16-18 helps students to gain a bit of experience at juggling education and work. There's no EMA at University besides a maintenance loan that is expended on rent. So, even if it may boost overall a-level results slightly and encourages more people into college education, it also gears those who depended on EMA up for a University life of employment difficulties and poor financial management at a time when you're arguably at your poorest

    I would be happy to see it go, but I really think there needs to be more money invested in assessing and targeting people who really need support; support which comes in the form of food, transport and revision material vouchers and more opportunities to work part-time.
    It all well and good saying that. But a lot of people have tried very very hard to get a part time job. It just is not always possible. Especially if you live in a more rural area.

    Also, the comparison to university is slightly flawed. Most university courses have more free time than most sixth forms / colleges (at least in my experience).
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    Then surely that is the teachers / sixth forms / colleges fault for not sticking to the EMA rules then?
    I agree with you. It was partly the teachers fault. But I really don't think money should be the motive in the first place for education, especially further education. That's just my opinion. You help people with education, but hand outs are the types of things which creates a welfare society.
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    If you disagree with hand outs, you disagree with benefits?
 
 
 
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