Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I have a HP Pavillion dv6000.

    To be honest, until a few days ago I didnt know what overclocking meant/entailed.

    I did a bit of research and now I have a general understanding of the term.

    However, I came across an article which said overclocking a laptop (especiall an HP one) was not recommended.

    Why is this ?

    Has anyone overclocked their PC ? What were your experiences ?

    I'm using and nvidia Geforce GO 7400 Graphics card.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ari Ben Canaan)
    I have a HP Pavillion dv6000.

    To be honest, until a few days ago I didnt know what overclocking meant/entailed.

    I did a bit of research and now I have a general understanding of the term.

    However, I came across an article which said overclocking a laptop (especiall an HP one) was not recommended.

    Why is this ?

    Has anyone overclocked their PC ? What were your experiences ?

    I'm using and nvidia Geforce GO 7400 Graphics card.
    I believe it's because of the danger of overheating. When you overclock a pc, you need a pretty good fan (or another cooling method) to prevent overheating, however for a laptop due to the size constraints, the fan is usually not adequate after you overclock. Someone correct me if I'm wrong though
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    No point in overclocking 80% of laptops as there is no real effective way to remove the large amounts of extra heat dissipated by the processor. This because the casing of a laptop is much more smaller than one for a desktop. You could damage the motherboard and all the other internal components inside.

    Also, laptop processors are designed to cope with small voltages, and overclocking it (giving it a higher voltage) will possibly instantly damage it. There will also be the problem of your power supply possibly not being able to deliver the extra demand for power.

    Do at your own risk, but I advise against it. Overclocking was meant for desktops.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gildartz)
    I believe it's because of the danger of overheating. When you overclock a pc, you need a pretty good fan (or another cooling method) to prevent overheating, however for a laptop due to the size constraints, the fan is usually not adequate after you overclock. Someone correct me if I'm wrong though

    (Original post by SuperiorHuman)
    No point in overclocking 80% of laptops as there is no real effective way to remove the large amounts of extra heat dissipated by the processor. This because the casing of a laptop is much more smaller than one for a desktop. You could damage the motherboard and all the other internal components inside.

    Also, laptop processors are designed to cope with small voltages, and overclocking it (giving it a higher voltage) will possibly instantly damage it. There will also be the problem of your power supply possibly not being able to deliver the extra demand for power.

    Do at your own risk, but I advise against it. Overclocking was meant for desktops.
    Ah, I see. I'll take your advice.

    However, this would be relatively safe to do on a desktop PC, right ?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ari Ben Canaan)
    Ah, I see. I'll take your advice.

    However, this would be relatively safe to do on a desktop PC, right ?
    Provided you can adequately cool it, yes it would.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Nope. This is one very overclocked PC. Note the water injection cooling system


    It's called overclocked orange. The thing with overclocking is that you WILL need a new way to cool it down.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ari Ben Canaan)
    Ah, I see. I'll take your advice.

    However, this would be relatively safe to do on a desktop PC, right ?
    Yes, provided you could figure out a way to remove the extra heat. This may be done through adding extra vents/fans or even using a water cooled method. But most high end desktop PC's have some room to overclock without upgrading the cooling system provided it isn't a Dell workstation.

    Also, my brother has a Pavillion and I know for a fact that they run too hot even at normal loads. They are notorious for that.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My Toshiba Satellite is always overheating cos I use to many applications I think, so I bought an Akasa cooler from PC World and now it never overheats unless I forget to turn on the cooler.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SuperiorHuman)
    Also, my brother has a Pavillion and I know for a fact that they run too hot even at normal loads. They are notorious for that.
    Yeah, true that. My laptop's core temperature hit 66 degrees yesterday whilst it was converting a movie. :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ari Ben Canaan)

    Why is this ?
    As mentioned heat dissipation in a laptop is pretty bad, laptops in general tend to heat up under stressful load. Over clocking would produce allot more heat which the OEM fans wouldnt be able to dissipate.

    Not to mention it would drain your laptop battery down to its core, since your drawing more power from your power supply such as the laptop battery or mains, your laptop would have less than half the run time it has when its not overclocked.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fibrebiz)
    Nope. This is one very overclocked PC. Note the water injection cooling system


    It's called overclocked orange. The thing with overclocking is that you WILL need a new way to cool it down.
    What a silly comment.
    The reality is that you may need extra cooling
    it all depends on
    (i) what cpu you are trying to overclock
    (ii) what kind of speeds you are trying to reach
    (iii) what your current airflow is like
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

2,917

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
  • create my feed
  • edit my feed
Poll
How are you feeling about GCSE results day?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.