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    the threat level from the fukushima disaster went up to its highest level today - it's the lame level as chernobyl. Anyone know why? Does that mean the fukishima plant is at risk of imminent meltdown?

    I'm intrigued.
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    Even if it did meltdown ( I think some of the fuel rods did partially melt) Fukushima has a core catcher so it won't seep into the ground water ( in theory)

    It won't explode at any rate

    Mad Vlad will likely be here soon he is the resident expert on nuclear reactors
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    (Original post by blue_shift86)
    the threat level from the fukushima disaster went up to its highest level today - it's the lame level as chernobyl. Anyone know why? Does that mean the fukishima plant is at risk of imminent meltdown?

    I'm intrigued.
    Because of a statistical analysis of the quantity of radioactivity released from the plant (estimated to be about 630,000 terabequerels)

    The INES level isn't related to the danger posed by the incident. To compare, the quantity of radioactivity released from Fukushima is a mere 10% of that released into the environment by Chernobyl, and the two accidents are completely different in that Fukushima's radioactivity comprises of relatively short-lived isotopes, like Iodine-131, Nitrogen-13 and small quantities of Caesium-137, whereas Chernobyl was literally incinerating Uranium, Plutonium, Strontium-90 along with Radio-Iodine etc. and spewing them out unchecked into the atmosphere.

    The two incidents may have the same INES level, but are in completely different leagues. The worst is over at Fukushima, it won't get any worse.
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    Because of a statistical analysis of the quantity of radioactivity released from the plant (estimated to be about 630,000 terabequerels)

    The INES level isn't related to the danger posed by the incident. To compare, the quantity of radioactivity released from Fukushima is a mere 10% of that released into the environment by Chernobyl, and the two accidents are completely different in that Fukushima's radioactivity comprises of relatively short-lived isotopes, like Iodine-131, Nitrogen-13 and small quantities of Caesium-137, whereas Chernobyl was literally incinerating Uranium, Plutonium, Strontium-90 along with Radio-Iodine etc. and spewing them out unchecked into the atmosphere.

    The two incidents may have the same INES level, but are in completely different leagues. The worst is over at Fukushima, it won't get any worse.
    Just out of interest what does the INES level refer to then?
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    Next level is going to be vietnam war level.
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    (Original post by Maximilliano)
    Just out of interest what does the INES level refer to then?
    The scale of the nuclear incident according to 3 different criteria:

    Effect on People and the Environment - which looks at the health risks and how far reaching a release of radioactivity is.

    Radiological Barriers and Control - which looks at the quantity of radioactivity released and to what extent the design of the facility has failed to contain this radioactivity.

    Defence in Depth - which looks at how the redundant backups have performed.

    More info: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Fac...glish/ines.pdf
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    The scale of the nuclear incident according to 3 different criteria:

    Effect on People and the Environment - which looks at the health risks and how far reaching a release of radioactivity is.

    Radiological Barriers and Control - which looks at the quantity of radioactivity released and to what extent the design of the facility has failed to contain this radioactivity.

    Defence in Depth - which looks at how the redundant backups have performed.

    More info: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Fac...glish/ines.pdf
    Ah, so methinks you weren't criticizing media because of the method of analysing them, just the fact that it has a limit (7) so it cannot distinguish between two 'Major incidents'.
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    (Original post by Maximilliano)
    Ah, so methinks you weren't criticizing media because of the method of analysing them, just the fact that it has a limit (7) so it cannot distinguish between two 'Major incidents'.
    Correct. The media hasn't exactly done anything but sensationalise this limitation, though.
 
 
 
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