AQA A2 Literature - "Love through the Ages" wider reading Watch

Bella_Cullen
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
I know that for the AQA A2 Literature exam (specification A) we are advised to develop wider reading references in-depth and I feel okay with this but I am struggling to consolidate my wider reading. Initially, I was grouping my notes on wider reading into categories but then I read that "candidates should be cautious of preparation that is weighted too heavily towards to the study of topics" (from the AQA examiner's report, LITA3, 2010 examination - June series) which has made me worry because I have mainly been concentrating on studying topics. The topic of "Love through the Ages" is so broad that I thought that was probably a good way in which to tackle it but maybe not. How have you been studying and making notes on wider reading?
0
reply
angelvicky
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
i'm also doing this exam and i dont even know what to do...so confused
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
Well to be honest, I don't know if this is the right way to go about revising for the exam.. but you've got to remember that only 30%/40% of your reference during the exam should be dedicated to your wider reading - that is what has been stated under the mark scheme. Thus, you should concentrate on the 'unseen extracts'. Anyhow. I have been collating all my wider reading texts (2 prose, 2 poems and 2 dramas for each) into a table subcatergorising them into 'types of love' i.e. unrequited, forbidden.. etc. Then I have added columns to analyse their form, structure and language - BECAUSE this is what is needed to be concentrated on - also an extra column for quotations. You must remember to try to make some comparison between these texts and highlight the fact of love THROUGH THE AGES - therefore, TIME is a very important point to address. However, you may choose to go about this a different way and find a smaller group of texts that easily and suitably relate to different types of love ranging in their contextual periods, because many prose, dramas and poems do freely exhaust multiple types of love. Looking at one past paper specifically, I think this Janurary's, the 'pains of love' was highlighted in the unseen extracts, and to be honest this paves an easy route to several types - obsession, unrequited, forbidden... the list goes on.

Quick question... how do you analyse the 'structure' of prose extracts?

Thanks
0
reply
angelvicky
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
(Original post by meowoofbaa)
Well to be honest, I don't know if this is the right way to go about revising for the exam.. but you've got to remember that only 30%/40% of your reference during the exam should be dedicated to your wider reading - that is what has been stated under the mark scheme. Thus, you should concentrate on the 'unseen extracts'. Anyhow. I have been collating all my wider reading texts (2 prose, 2 poems and 2 dramas for each) into a table subcatergorising them into 'types of love' i.e. unrequited, forbidden.. etc. Then I have added columns to analyse their form, structure and language - BECAUSE this is what is needed to be concentrated on - also an extra column for quotations. You must remember to try to make some comparison between these texts and highlight the fact of love THROUGH THE AGES - therefore, TIME is a very important point to address. However, you may choose to go about this a different way and find a smaller group of texts that easily and suitably relate to different types of love ranging in their contextual periods, because many prose, dramas and poems do freely exhaust multiple types of love. Looking at one past paper specifically, I think this Janurary's, the 'pains of love' was highlighted in the unseen extracts, and to be honest this paves an easy route to several types - obsession, unrequited, forbidden... the list goes on.

Quick question... how do you analyse the 'structure' of prose extracts?

Thanks

i have also done that. but i'm a bit shaky on the form and structure part . what texts have u done? we have done
-Enduring Love
-Mrs Dalloway
-Much Ado about nothing
-A streetcar named desire
- Moll Flanders
-Chaucer-the franklin's tale, the wife of bath, knight's tale
-the virgin and the gipsy
-the handmaid's tale
pride and prejudice

and lots of poems
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 8 years ago
#5
(Original post by angelvicky)
i have also done that. but i'm a bit shaky on the form and structure part . what texts have u done? we have done
-Enduring Love
-Mrs Dalloway
-Much Ado about nothing
-A streetcar named desire
- Moll Flanders
-Chaucer-the franklin's tale, the wife of bath, knight's tale
-the virgin and the gipsy
-the handmaid's tale
pride and prejudice

and lots of poems
Wuthering Heights - Bronte
'Tis a pity she's a wh... (yeah, lol) - Ford
The Millers Tale - Chaucer
A Woman Of No Importance - Wilde
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof - Williams
On Chesil Beach - McEwan
Rebecca - Du Maurier
Othello
Hamlet
Much ado about nothing

Lots of William Blake poemmms and others, i.e. Christina Rossetti, Andrew Marvell, Ben Jonson, Heaney etc.
Personally, I really enjoy the works of Wilde, I would reccommend it.
There's also a lot of extracts in the little orange 'love through the ages' book if you've got that.

That's MORE than enough :-)
I'll attach something that's quite helpful, I just found it while googling - it's quite helpful when trying to analyse form structure language.

The website ''helpmewithenglish'' is also very helpful.
Attached files
0
reply
angelvicky
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 8 years ago
#6
lol i also found that and i've ordered the book...oh well we should use this thread to revise
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 8 years ago
#7
(Original post by angelvicky)
lol i also found that and i've ordered the book...oh well we should use this thread to revise
Haha. Yeah, just use that book and i guess revise with your class and ask teacher or extra help?
Good luck
0
reply
angelvicky
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
(Original post by meowoofbaa)
Haha. Yeah, just use that book and i guess revise with your class and ask teacher or extra help?
Good luck
lol thanks and you too :d. i'll need the goodluck to get d "B" i need in this exam
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 8 years ago
#9
(Original post by angelvicky)
lol thanks and you too :d. i'll need the goodluck to get d "B" i need in this exam
what did you get for AS? and this coursework?
0
reply
angelvicky
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 8 years ago
#10
gt C for AS and i was 4marks off A for dis coursework
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 8 years ago
#11
(Original post by angelvicky)
gt C for AS and i was 4marks off A for dis coursework
Ah nice. Well good luck! We've not been given our coursework grade for this one yet mm
0
reply
xelarose
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#12
Report 8 years ago
#12
For the wider reading, just like last year, i've just been reading absolutely loads of novels, plays and poems. Readings a hobby on mine anyways, so I just incorporate it into that and for revision i'll go through each book and make general points about its theme, historical context, language, structure, form etc. Plus, i'll try and do essay after essay to brush up on my exam technique.

Been reading everything from Shakespeare to Hardy to Burgess to the Bronte's :p: but in school we've been doing..

Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
The Millers Tale - Geoffrey Chaucer
Othello - William Shakespeare
Death of a Salesman - Arthur Miller
Ghosts - Henrik Ibson
The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
(and of course, loads of poems)

not a substantial amount I don't think, but we've been encouraged to do lots of wider reading at home.

The thing i'm quite confused about is the second exam where you can include any wider reading (you're not just limited to discussing only prose, poem or play). Do you just talk about "love" in general or do you have to find a theme like the first exam question? Sorry if this sounds confusing.
1
reply
Melting Sugar.
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report 8 years ago
#13
I took the exam last year and would agree with the examiners report that sticking to topics held people back as the text we were given to analyse in the exam wasn't really any particular group so I guess a lot of people tried to twist it to be nothing it's not.

I hated this subject but really enjoyed the wider reading. :mmm:
0
reply
xelarose
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#14
Report 8 years ago
#14
(Original post by meowoofbaa)
Well to be honest, I don't know if this is the right way to go about revising for the exam.. but you've got to remember that only 30%/40% of your reference during the exam should be dedicated to your wider reading - that is what has been stated under the mark scheme. Thus, you should concentrate on the 'unseen extracts'. Anyhow. I have been collating all my wider reading texts (2 prose, 2 poems and 2 dramas for each) into a table subcatergorising them into 'types of love' i.e. unrequited, forbidden.. etc. Then I have added columns to analyse their form, structure and language - BECAUSE this is what is needed to be concentrated on - also an extra column for quotations. You must remember to try to make some comparison between these texts and highlight the fact of love THROUGH THE AGES - therefore, TIME is a very important point to address. However, you may choose to go about this a different way and find a smaller group of texts that easily and suitably relate to different types of love ranging in their contextual periods, because many prose, dramas and poems do freely exhaust multiple types of love. Looking at one past paper specifically, I think this Janurary's, the 'pains of love' was highlighted in the unseen extracts, and to be honest this paves an easy route to several types - obsession, unrequited, forbidden... the list goes on.

Quick question... how do you analyse the 'structure' of prose extracts?

Thanks
Loved your "English-y" use of thus haha glad to see i'm not the only one who uses this all the time!

and good advice! I think I might do this actually, once you've read what you need to read you an just organise your thoughts a little. But how would categorise texts with more than one theme? Also, what theme do you think we'll get this year, and what type of literature? Last summer it was prose so I'm predicting we'll get plays. Really hope its not poems because I can hardly remember the ones we've covered :confused:

Also, when writing about structure in a prose, I tend to emphasise the grammar quite a lot because it seems this is used far more in prose than in plays or poems. Even simple things like exclamation marks or hyphens can give you insight into the writers feelings because thats exactly what grammar is meant to do, turn words into speech in the mind. Even little things like a lack of full stops or short or long sentances can have lots of meaning Also, I tend to talk about the transition of language at the start of the prose extract to the end as this is technically how the author has structured their points. For example, a first person narrative say, of somebody they love could start off happy but then as the prose develops, changes - if you understand what I mean? :p:

I think it is easier to look for structure in plays and poems so thats why you should look for the simplest of things in prose I think.

Sorry for the rambling haha! :p:
0
reply
xelarose
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#15
Report 8 years ago
#15
(Original post by Melting Sugar.)
I took the exam last year and would agree with the examiners report that sticking to topics held people back as the text we were given to analyse in the exam wasn't really any particular group so I guess a lot of people tried to twist it to be nothing it's not.

I hated this subject but really enjoyed the wider reading. :mmm:
Totally agree with you on that haha! :p:

Are you talking about exam A or B that people shouldn't stick to one topic?
0
reply
Melting Sugar.
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#16
Report 8 years ago
#16
(Original post by xelarose)
Totally agree with you on that haha! :p:

Are you talking about exam A or B that people shouldn't stick to one topic?

I didn't mean they shouldn't stick to one topic, I mean they shouldn't waste time worrying if the extract doesn't fit into any of the topics they've studied - which is why studying texts rather than topics would be better.
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report 8 years ago
#17
(Original post by xelarose)
The thing i'm quite confused about is the second exam where you can include any wider reading (you're not just limited to discussing only prose, poem or play). Do you just talk about "love" in general or do you have to find a theme like the first exam question? Sorry if this sounds confusing.
The theme is given to you in the question.
E.g;
2 Read the two extracts (Item C and Item D) carefully, bearing in mind that they were written atdifferent times by different writers and are open to different interpretations.Write a comparison of the ways in which "forbidden love" is presented in these two extracts.

0
reply
xelarose
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#18
Report 8 years ago
#18
(Original post by meowoofbaa)
The theme is given to you in the question.
E.g;
2 Read the two extracts (Item C and Item D) carefully, bearing in mind that they were written atdifferent times by different writers and are open to different interpretations.Write a comparison of the ways in which "forbidden love" is presented in these two extracts.

Oh for both questions? thanks!
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 8 years ago
#19
(Original post by xelarose)
Loved your "English-y" use of thus haha glad to see i'm not the only one who uses this all the time!

and good advice! I think I might do this actually, once you've read what you need to read you an just organise your thoughts a little. But how would categorise texts with more than one theme? Also, what theme do you think we'll get this year, and what type of literature? Last summer it was prose so I'm predicting we'll get plays. Really hope its not poems because I can hardly remember the ones we've covered :confused:

Also, when writing about structure in a prose, I tend to emphasise the grammar quite a lot because it seems this is used far more in prose than in plays or poems. Even simple things like exclamation marks or hyphens can give you insight into the writers feelings because thats exactly what grammar is meant to do, turn words into speech in the mind. Even little things like a lack of full stops or short or long sentances can have lots of meaning Also, I tend to talk about the transition of language at the start of the prose extract to the end as this is technically how the author has structured their points. For example, a first person narrative say, of somebody they love could start off happy but then as the prose develops, changes - if you understand what I mean? :p:

I think it is easier to look for structure in plays and poems so thats why you should look for the simplest of things in prose I think.

Sorry for the rambling haha! :p:
Haha. Yeah I think I do this too, looking for the simplest of structures in prose extracts, but really getting a lot out of them.. I think in my coursework I wrote an entire page speaking about something to do with wuthering heights and it was so minor, but I could speak for aggges about it.

Oh and what type of literature do I think will come up on the first 2 extracts, well, my teacher went to one of those AQA meetings were they give the people hints to what is going to come up in the next few years' papers or whatever, and I think ... If I can remember correctly that because last years summer paper, and I quote "was so dreadful" they may be a bit kinder (PSHH AQA is never!) anyway, I think my teacher said that the first 2 extracts A&B will remain to be poems because , personally i think this is easier...easier to analyse as it is unseen. If it is prose my brain will auto switch off by the length of text when i see it! But i'll get back to you on this one, just incase i'm remembering incorrectly. Ha.
0
reply
meowoofbaa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 8 years ago
#20
(Original post by xelarose)
Oh for both questions? thanks!
Only the second question I think. The first is just a comparitive / contrast in TIME, but obviously you can find and mention the comparison in type of love.

Question ONE (JUNE 2010 PAPER)
Read the two prose extracts (Item A and Item B) carefully, bearing in mind that
they were written at different times by different writers and are open to different
interpretations.
Write a comparison of these two extracts.
In your answer you should consider the ways in which Carter (in Item A) and Sterne
(in Item B) use form, structure and language to present their thoughts and ideas. You should make relevant references to your wider reading in prose.


Question TWO
0 2 Read the two extracts (Item C and Item D) carefully, bearing in mind that they were
written at different times by different writers and are open to different interpretations.
Write a comparison of the ways in which views about the nature of love are presented in these two extracts.
In your answer you should consider the ways in which Marvell (in Item C) and
Shakespeare (in Item D) use form, structure and language to express their thoughts and ideas. You should make relevant references to your wider reading.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Get into Teaching in South Yorkshire Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • The University of Law
    Solicitor Series: Assessing Trainee Skills – LPC, GDL and MA Law - London Moorgate campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Sat, 29 Feb '20

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (531)
66.79%
No (264)
33.21%

Watched Threads

View All