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    I applied for Primary PGCE at Hull University and managed to obtain an interview but I was unsuccessful. I've applied for several Primary and Early year courses all over the country but have been unsuccessful in even getting an interview. I'm getting rejection after rejection.
    I studied BA Film and Broadcast Production at University and obtained a 2.1. The course is primarily media focused but I am able to link it to Primary since I did take modules in communications and cultural studies. I also retook my GCSE Science in 2009 because I only got a D at school.
    Since finishing university I have been working in a supermarket, not my dream job. For the past year I have been volunteering in a Primary school for two days a week working with year 1 and year 2 classes.

    I am considering becoming a Teaching assistant as I believe this will give me more opportunities to help the children learn and develop.

    If I was to apply next year for a primary PGCE is there anything I can do to improve my chances other than my English and Maths?

    I have spoken to many Teachers who did a PGCE and all of them have said that many people get rejected the first time. I don't know if that is true or if it was said to make me feel better. I do believe what with the cuts a lot of people with the potential to become teachers will miss out.

    I can think of one already which may have helped. I never mentioned that my course also focused on communications and cultural studies so maybe it's worth mentioning that in my personal statement when I rewrite it.

    Any advice would be much appreciated.
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    Before applying did you check that the universities would accept your degree for the Primary PGCE? Have you tried to enquire as to why you were unsuccessful?
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    Hi,

    Sorry to hear that you didn't get on the course, for what its worth they were right when they said how hard it is to get onto one. I know many people at my interview who'd gone to Hull general primary first and didn't get on so the competition must have been fierce this year. My degree isn't a "normal degree" either, in fact telling you what it is would be a dead giveaway as so few places do it!! The fact that you got interviewed as well is a good sign as they don't interview just anyone, so keep thinking that too .

    Whilst its hard now I think the plans you've got are really good. If you can't get a TA job then it might be worth taking any job (part time if you can) and just doing volunteer work in a local primary school when you get spare time. It might be tough but it would certainly boost your chances with more experience. Theres not much more I can add really except good luck and fingers crossed for you, there is always next year, which could be your year!
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    If you've had an interview at one place it suggests they weren't bothered about your qualifications - why would they interview you then turn you down based on something they knew prior to interview? Suggests you didn't do something right at interview.

    Some places are fussy about degree though, and only want traditional subjects, so it's worth checking with them BEFORE you apply whether your degree is ok for them. If it's not there's not much you can do tbh without taking another degree! Plenty of places will take anyone with a degree at 2.1 - Oxford Brookes for example which is a great place to go (I'm there so a little biased) and I think Reading too which is v highly rated.

    Getting a job as a TA may help, the more experience with kids the better tbh.
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    Thanks for all your advice.

    Bedella I already have a part time job and volunteer in a school two days per week but thank you for your advice and ecouragement.

    Modgepodge- It's my belief that it was the one to one interview and the English and Maths test that let me down. It's something that I'm going to work on more this year.

    I've had some Teaching Assistant interviews and they are pretty confident that I will find the right job for me so I'm not going to give up. In fact I'm actually looking into applying to do an NVQ to improve my job prospects.
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    Sorry Bonjovirocksmyworld1!

    If I had a brain I would have picked up the fact that you said in your original post that you were already doing volunteer work :facepalm:! I've got the CACHE level three diploma in childcare and education (equal to NVQ 3 I think) so its definately worth it. May take a bit longer but you'll get there, you sound like you're doing all the right things (again sorry for not picking that up!!!). Maths is hit and miss with different tests. I remember frantically revising nearly all of GSCE Bitesize only to get there and find 6 questions which were really basic. Just keep going and if you can get a TA job fab, Best of luck
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    I agree with what ppl have said here. The English and Maths tests are usually a pass/fail (although it's worth checking this with Hull), so if you think you may have failed one, it doesn't matter what they think of you in other tasks they have to reject you. Try and get detailed feedback on exactly what you failed on.

    Also, if you don't get on this year (but keep trying as there's still some with places), I'd recommed trying to get a different job other than working in a supermarket. If you can get a TA job and live on the money then great, but if not, try and get something that demonstrates strong transferable skills, such as organisation skills, self motivation, people management (for later in your career), negotiation, communicating accross certain barriers (language/age/level of understanding etc). I'm coming into teaching as a career changer, and although my degree is NC, I have very little school experience, so in that sense we cancel each other out! I think for me it really helped my application that my job now is a decent one with lots of these transferable skills to talk about.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Bonjovirocksmyworld1)
    I applied for Primary PGCE at Hull University and managed to obtain an interview but I was unsuccessful. I've applied for several Primary and Early year courses all over the country but have been unsuccessful in even getting an interview. I'm getting rejection after rejection.
    I studied BA Film and Broadcast Production at University and obtained a 2.1. The course is primarily media focused but I am able to link it to Primary since I did take modules in communications and cultural studies. I also retook my GCSE Science in 2009 because I only got a D at school.
    Since finishing university I have been working in a supermarket, not my dream job. For the past year I have been volunteering in a Primary school for two days a week working with year 1 and year 2 classes.

    I am considering becoming a Teaching assistant as I believe this will give me more opportunities to help the children learn and develop.

    If I was to apply next year for a primary PGCE is there anything I can do to improve my chances other than my English and Maths?

    I have spoken to many Teachers who did a PGCE and all of them have said that many people get rejected the first time. I don't know if that is true or if it was said to make me feel better. I do believe what with the cuts a lot of people with the potential to become teachers will miss out.

    I can think of one already which may have helped. I never mentioned that my course also focused on communications and cultural studies so maybe it's worth mentioning that in my personal statement when I rewrite it.

    Any advice would be much appreciated.
    Hey,

    So sorry to hear about your rejections. I'm still doing A-levels, so I'm going down the undergraduate route and have accepted an offer for Early Years Education. However, my mum is a primary teacher, so I know a fair bit about PGCEs because I know a lot of people who have done them. Primary PGCEs are hard to get on to and, trust me, many people don't make it first, or even second time!

    You have a good grade in your undergraduate degree, which is a huge bonus and it is something that can be linked to the primary curriculum which is also a bonus!

    You have plenty of experience in schools, I would say keep this up, but I personally wouldn't recommend becoming a teaching assistant for the following reason; I think that you have more than sufficient experience in a primary classroom environment. You could try volunteering with children in a different environment, that shows that you love kids and are interested in their company and different ways in which they learn. I'm a young leader for Rainbows (Girlguiding UK) and I'm currently about my start my unit leader qualification. I see the girls (aged 5-7, ties in perefectly with early years!), learn and develop in a different environment. I know that this volunteering helped me tremendously with my application. It looks good on the form and gives something extra to talk about at interviews!

    I have also spent a day volunteering with children from Belarus, just playing games with them, not much nor the most compelling of things I know, but again it looked good on my form and made me stand out from the crowd.

    Volunteering with girlguiding is easy to organise, they are crying out for volunteers, and it only takes one hour a week. You could try volunteering in a children's hospice or run a summer club for children. There's loads to choose from, volunteering with children and it will, without a doubt, make you stand out from the crowd.

    You should definately mention every relevant element of your course in your personal statement, really sell it to the universities!! Sell yourself!

    I also did GCSE Child Development when I did my GCSEs. I know that this has helped me so much because I've learnt a lot about the way in which children learn and how they have to learn through stimulation and play. You could try and do a similar course, again will give you the edge.

    My other suggestion, is that you could do an undergraduate course in Primary/Early Years Education. I know you already have a degree and I also understand that due to that you may not have the finances to do another 3/4 course, but in general (although they are competitive) they are easier to get onto than PGCEs.

    Very best of look applying next year, I can see that you're really passionate, don't ever ever ever give up! I hope of helped, best of luck!!

    PS, if you want any more advice on anything I've said then please just quote me and I'll come back to you.
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    Hannah thank you so much for your advice I just got another rejection letter through the post but I am not going to give up. Is there a site where I can find out opportunities for volunteering with Rainbows/brownies? After what you said I'm going to look into doing a GCSE course in child care and work on my Maths and English and apply again next time around for a PGCE at Hull University. Oh and I'm 26 this year still with student debt so the idea of going back to University to study for a further few years really doesn't sit well with me. As you can tell I'm passionate but desperate to get out there and share my knowledge and ideas with the world.
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    I can completely sympathise with you. I have so far failed to get on a Primary PGCE course this year too.

    I have 10 GCSEs - all either A* A or B, an AS Level in Spanish and A A C in my A Levels. I also have a 2:1 History degree. Last July I undertook 3 weeks full time work experience at a local Primary School, and I also have previous experience working with a Scouts group.

    I applied first to Chester in November - they took forever to decide after interview, so I was already very late in the cycle when I got rejected. Manchester Met were full, as were Bangor. I tried Brighton and Leeds Met - both rejections without interview. I'm now on to my last hope for 2011 - Greenwich.

    I have to admit that I'm slightly shocked I'm in this position given my academic success and that I've actively sought to pursue my desire to become a teacher. I did very well in Chester's interview tests and the interview went great. And I didn't try and punch high in my application process - I understand that Primary PGCE's are highly oversubscribed and Universities like Warwick and Manchester would really look for the best potential teachers out there.

    I'll be gutted if Greenwich is a 'no' too - but I'm not giving up. After Easter I'm spending three months working full time voluntarily in two different Primary schools to bump up my experience. I've also bought lots of books to read about the teaching practice. I just wish I didn't have to wait another year and pay a hell of a lot more for the PGCE - though I know in the end it'll be worth it.
    I think if we keep trying we'll get there eventually! Good luck!
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    Primary is exceptionally difficult to get onto, they are just extremely competitive because so many people apply.

    The best way to become a Primary teacher is to do a BEd degree. People doing a BEd are the people who have always wanted to teach from an early age and are most interested in it, hence better career prospects.

    I would pick a BEd over a PGCE any day if I was hiring a teacher because it is like saying 4 years experience vs only 1
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    (Original post by dom99)
    Primary is exceptionally difficult to get onto, they are just extremely competitive because so many people apply.

    The best way to become a Primary teacher is to do a BEd degree. People doing a BEd are the people who have always wanted to teach from an early age and are most interested in it, hence better career prospects.

    I would pick a BEd over a PGCE any day if I was hiring a teacher because it is like saying 4 years experience vs only 1
    That's not really useful to those who already have degrees - to do another BEd degree would take a lot of time and money, especially when a lot of graduates have debt on their shoulders. Hence why this is the postgrad forum...
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    (Original post by dom99)
    Primary is exceptionally difficult to get onto, they are just extremely competitive because so many people apply.

    The best way to become a Primary teacher is to do a BEd degree. People doing a BEd are the people who have always wanted to teach from an early age and are most interested in it, hence better career prospects.

    I would pick a BEd over a PGCE any day if I was hiring a teacher because it is like saying 4 years experience vs only 1
    Actually, many of the school teachers who I've spoken to say that a BEd is not more advantageous than having a PGCE. In fact, in some cases having a non-related degree can be more desirable as it provides the trainee teacher with a different set of skills and experiences.

    One of the best teachers I know, for example, comes from a media background. He is extremely creative and knows how to use the equipment/ICT in a way that can make learning really fun...

    Really, it depends on you as an applicant and what you can bring to the classroom rather than which route you have chosen to take.
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    There is no comparison between a 4 year BEd course studying Primary Education with school placements and a 10 month fast track pgce. In my opinion pgces should only be a secondary and higher option, for at least your degree subject may be used appropriatly at that level. Of course a good teacher depends on the person, but if I was hiring a new primary teacher I would choose a BEd over a PGCE is all im saying as it is the proper qualifacation for that area.

    My advise would be to definitly do a year working as a TA before rushing into it, and try while you are there to get as much experience of taking the whole class as possible.
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    (Original post by smileysteph)
    I can completely sympathise with you. I have so far failed to get on a Primary PGCE course this year too.

    I have 10 GCSEs - all either A* A or B, an AS Level in Spanish and A A C in my A Levels. I also have a 2:1 History degree. Last July I undertook 3 weeks full time work experience at a local Primary School, and I also have previous experience working with a Scouts group.

    I applied first to Chester in November - they took forever to decide after interview, so I was already very late in the cycle when I got rejected. Manchester Met were full, as were Bangor. I tried Brighton and Leeds Met - both rejections without interview. I'm now on to my last hope for 2011 - Greenwich.

    I have to admit that I'm slightly shocked I'm in this position given my academic success and that I've actively sought to pursue my desire to become a teacher. I did very well in Chester's interview tests and the interview went great. And I didn't try and punch high in my application process - I understand that Primary PGCE's are highly oversubscribed and Universities like Warwick and Manchester would really look for the best potential teachers out there.

    I'll be gutted if Greenwich is a 'no' too - but I'm not giving up. After Easter I'm spending three months working full time voluntarily in two different Primary schools to bump up my experience. I've also bought lots of books to read about the teaching practice. I just wish I didn't have to wait another year and pay a hell of a lot more for the PGCE - though I know in the end it'll be worth it.
    I think if we keep trying we'll get there eventually! Good luck!
    I really hope that you get accepted to Greenwich and if not don't give up.
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    (Original post by SundayGirl.)
    Actually, many of the school teachers who I've spoken to say that a BEd is not more advantageous than having a PGCE. In fact, in some cases having a non-related degree can be more desirable as it provides the trainee teacher with a different set of skills and experiences.

    One of the best teachers I know, for example, comes from a media background. He is extremely creative and knows how to use the equipment/ICT in a way that can make learning really fun...

    Really, it depends on you as an applicant and what you can bring to the classroom rather than which route you have chosen to take.
    I agree the majority of Teachers that I have spoke to that work in a primary school as a class teacher have done different degrees and then gone onto either do a PGCE or a GTP. Having a relevant qualification like the BEd is probably a good thing to have, an advantage but not necessary to become a good Primary School teacher. Having a degree or BEd does not mean you will be a good teacher.
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    (Original post by dom99)
    There is no comparison between a 4 year BEd course studying Primary Education with school placements and a 10 month fast track pgce. In my opinion pgces should only be a secondary and higher option, for at least your degree subject may be used appropriatly at that level. Of course a good teacher depends on the person, but if I was hiring a new primary teacher I would choose a BEd over a PGCE is all im saying as it is the proper qualifacation for that area.

    My advise would be to definitly do a year working as a TA before rushing into it, and try while you are there to get as much experience of taking the whole class as possible.
    Thanks for your advice but even getting a TA job is proving difficult since there are not many opportunities out there and the starting salary is not nearly enough to support me if I move away.
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    (Original post by Jen43)
    I agree with what ppl have said here. The English and Maths tests are usually a pass/fail (although it's worth checking this with Hull), so if you think you may have failed one, it doesn't matter what they think of you in other tasks they have to reject you. Try and get detailed feedback on exactly what you failed on.

    Also, if you don't get on this year (but keep trying as there's still some with places), I'd recommed trying to get a different job other than working in a supermarket. If you can get a TA job and live on the money then great, but if not, try and get something that demonstrates strong transferable skills, such as organisation skills, self motivation, people management (for later in your career), negotiation, communicating accross certain barriers (language/age/level of understanding etc). I'm coming into teaching as a career changer, and although my degree is NC, I have very little school experience, so in that sense we cancel each other out! I think for me it really helped my application that my job now is a decent one with lots of these transferable skills to talk about.

    Good luck!
    Thanks Jen I do keep trying but there isn't many jobs out there.
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    Hiya,

    Just thought i'd share my experience, as it may be helpful.....

    I'm also going in to teaching as a career change and therefore don't have a great deal of school experience. I have worked in sales for almost 3 years since my degree (not my ideal job either, but originally a stop gap) but turns out it's a varied job that has enabled me to develop organisational and communication skills essential to becoming a good teacher. I have used my hols to volunteer in a primary school (total only about 12 days) and have been offered a place on the PGCE at Edge Hill in Sept.

    I think as long as you can show that you've developed essential skills through employment, and can reflect well on classroom experience in interview (how ever little) then you've got as good a chance as any!
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    Thanks Stephie for sharing your experience. Can I ask what degree you did before you worked in sales?

    I have been looking into gaining a certificate or qualification in childcare and education and then volunteer as a helper at Rainbows. The only thing holding me back is do I do it as long distance or go back to college part time.
 
 
 
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