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    Ive forgotten most of the novel

    Should I re-read the novel or should I just read chapter summaries?

    My exam is in late May, we're allowed to take the book in with us

    Board: AQA
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    Get this if you can, it's really good.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mice-Men-Tex.../dp/1841461148

    Have look at this as well

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit.../prosemicemen/
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    (Original post by jaydemikaela)
    Get this if you can, it's really good.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mice-Men-Tex.../dp/1841461148

    Have look at this as well

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit.../prosemicemen/
    I have that CGP book that you posted, I was just wondering should I just revise from revision books/chatper summaries. Or should I read the novel
    again?

    Ive basically forgotten the whole book thats why I dont know which one to choose from.
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    (Original post by ju1c)
    Ive forgotten most of the novel

    Should I re-read the novel or should I just read chapter summaries?

    My exam is in late May, we're allowed to take the book in with us

    Board: AQA
    Just read it. Man up.
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    Why don't you just read it? It's not exactly very long. Ffs my exams in May and I'm reading Grapes of Wrath again!
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    I've got the same exam. You have time to read it again.
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    Just read it, that way you can use quotes and refer to certain sections. Doesnt take long to read the maximum time if you read slowly and take in every word one afternoon.
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    (Original post by ju1c)
    I have that CGP book that you posted, I was just wondering should I just revise from revision books/chatper summaries. Or should I read the novel
    again?

    Ive basically forgotten the whole book thats why I dont know which one to choose from.
    Well from what I remember, it's not very long so you could read it again, and then just revise from the revision guide/chapter summarys.
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    Just revise the main events from the story, such as: when Lennie and Curley fight or Curley's Wife's death instead of reading it again. Revise the characters. revise the key themes and how they relate to each character. It might also be worth revising the setting. Im goin to pick out a few key quotes from the book and hope they realte to the question asked and learn them or remember the page number so i don't have to spend ages looking for them throughout the exam.
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    I got an A and probably, in all fairness, hadn't even spent an hour reading it
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    (Original post by liam1994)
    I got an A and probably, in all fairness, hadn't even spent an hour reading it
    How did you revise it?

    How did you structure your essays on it?
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    (Original post by ju1c)
    Ive forgotten most of the novel

    Should I re-read the novel or should I just read chapter summaries?

    My exam is in late May, we're allowed to take the book in with us

    Board: AQA
    I was thinking of reading it again, but now I'm thinking of just going through this:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit...plotrev1.shtml

    What do we think?? Still worth reading the book again??

    I think my board is Edexcel.
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    (Original post by Vixen47)
    I was thinking of reading it again, but now I'm thinking of just going through this:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit...plotrev1.shtml

    What do we think?? Still worth reading the book again??

    I think my board is Edexcel.
    In my opinion reading it may take a while, I watched the movie instead as visual pictures stick in my brain well. Although if you want to read the book then go for it
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    buy a york notes book on it. It summarises each chapter then goes into detail and includes stuff on themes and advice on how to answer the questions in the exam or for coursework according to whatever exam board you're doing. You can get a used one for 1p on amazon like i did but obviously still have to pay for postage and packaging.
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    (Original post by Hdizzle)
    buy a york notes book on it. It summarises each chapter then goes into detail and includes stuff on themes and advice on how to answer the questions in the exam or for coursework according to whatever exam board you're doing. You can get a used one for 1p on amazon like i did but obviously still have to pay for postage and packaging.
    Yup I've bought the book, are you just going through the york notes book then? Or are you making your own notes too?
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    (Original post by ju1c)
    Yup I've bought the book, are you just going through the york notes book then? Or are you making your own notes too?
    I've gone through the York Notes book, made my own notes in the novel, read some critical essays and part of Steinbeck's biography.

    There's a really good book that has the critical essays in them it's called
    "STEINBECK- A collection of Critical Essays Edited by Robert Murray Davis"

    One of the essays contains a really interesting view of George. I've typed it up on another thread so I've just copied and pasted:

    "It's easy to over-sentimentalize George's motives. Actually he has reasons of his own for pulling the trigger. Steinbeck makes it clear that George had tremendous difficulty bringing himself to destroy Lennie, although Lennie will not even know what has happened. What George is actually trying to kill is not Lennie, who is only a shell and a doomed one at that, but something in himself. Lennie's need for George is obvious, George's need for Lennie, though less obvious it is as great. In his most candid appraisal of himself, George says, "I ain't so bright neither, or I wouldn't be buckin' barley for my fifty and found. If I was even a little bit smart, I'd have my own little place..." He needs him, however, as more than just a rationalization for his own failure, for George not only protects Lennie but directs him. Lennie doesn't speak unless George permits him to; and, in the fight in which Curley's hand is broken, Lennie refuses even to defend himself until George tells him to, George of course directs Lennie partly to protect him from committing acts he could not mentally be responsible for, but George is not a wholly altruistic (unselfish) shepherd. Another aspect of the relationship becomes apparent when George tells Slim that Lennie, can't think of nothing to do himself, but he sure can take orders. Since George gives the orders, Lennie gives him a sense of power.

    Their dream not only gives a direction to their lives, but also makes them feel different from other people. Since this sense of difference can mean little to Lennie, it is part of the consolation George receives from the dream. George wants to be superior. With Lennie gone, his claim to distinction will be gone. Thus when George shoots Lennie, he is not destroying only the shared dream. He is also destroying the thing that makes him different and reducing himself to the status of an ordinary guy."

    If you got your hands on that book it would help a great deal. Also I suggest you look into the idea of the book sort of being based on the Arthurian story.
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    (Original post by Hdizzle)
    I've gone through the York Notes book, made my own notes in the novel, read some critical essays and part of Steinbeck's biography.

    There's a really good book that has the critical essays in them it's called
    "STEINBECK- A collection of Critical Essays Edited by Robert Murray Davis"

    One of the essays contains a really interesting view of George. I've typed it up on another thread so I've just copied and pasted:

    "It's easy to over-sentimentalize George's motives. Actually he has reasons of his own for pulling the trigger. Steinbeck makes it clear that George had tremendous difficulty bringing himself to destroy Lennie, although Lennie will not even know what has happened. What George is actually trying to kill is not Lennie, who is only a shell and a doomed one at that, but something in himself. Lennie's need for George is obvious, George's need for Lennie, though less obvious it is as great. In his most candid appraisal of himself, George says, "I ain't so bright neither, or I wouldn't be buckin' barley for my fifty and found. If I was even a little bit smart, I'd have my own little place..." He needs him, however, as more than just a rationalization for his own failure, for George not only protects Lennie but directs him. Lennie doesn't speak unless George permits him to; and, in the fight in which Curley's hand is broken, Lennie refuses even to defend himself until George tells him to, George of course directs Lennie partly to protect him from committing acts he could not mentally be responsible for, but George is not a wholly altruistic (unselfish) shepherd. Another aspect of the relationship becomes apparent when George tells Slim that Lennie, can't think of nothing to do himself, but he sure can take orders. Since George gives the orders, Lennie gives him a sense of power.

    Their dream not only gives a direction to their lives, but also makes them feel different from other people. Since this sense of difference can mean little to Lennie, it is part of the consolation George receives from the dream. George wants to be superior. With Lennie gone, his claim to distinction will be gone. Thus when George shoots Lennie, he is not destroying only the shared dream. He is also destroying the thing that makes him different and reducing himself to the status of an ordinary guy."

    If you got your hands on that book it would help a great deal. Also I suggest you look into the idea of the book sort of being based on the Arthurian story.
    Any chance if you could e-mail me your notes for Of mice and men? That would literally save my life.
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    (Original post by ju1c)
    Any chance if you could e-mail me your notes for Of mice and men? That would literally save my life.
    ROFL O.o i'm dumb and slow and epically dumb
    didn't realise you were THE SAME person ><

    just had a flick through the booklet it's actually pretty informative screw the York Notes guide or actually don't you may still want to get it.
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    (Original post by Hdizzle)
    ROFL O.o i'm dumb and slow and epically dumb
    didn't realise you were THE SAME person ><

    just had a flick through the booklet it's actually pretty informative screw the York Notes guide or actually don't you may still want to get it.
    Yeah, Ill PM you my hotmail and could you email it to me thanks.
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    just read the damn book. there are short stories longer than it. it would take you a couple of hours, tops
 
 
 
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