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    (Original post by lozzyhickers)
    By the way, you may already know this, but I have a tip for you!

    When you're doing your exam, ask for another piece of paper, even if you don't write answers on it,just doodle/scribble/use it as plan paper. That way, the chief examiner has to mark it, as it won't go through the scanners. So they can mark your other 'valid points' correctly, and mark other points that the other examiners might not know about!
    wouldn't that also mean harsher marking?
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    (Original post by Cheagul)
    wouldn't that also mean harsher marking?
    Not really no because the normal examiners don't teach the subject anyway, so often leave some points unmarked, as they would only be understood by someone who knows the subject.
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    (Original post by briesandwich)
    I don't know whether it's been posted yet, but I have links for last years unit 3 and unit 4 papers.

    Unit 3: http://www.edexcel.com/migrationdocu...e_20100129.pdf
    Unit 4: http://www.school-portal.co.uk/Group...urceID=3887957

    Enjoy!
    That seems fairly easy... The grade boundries last year were ridiculously low. For an A* in the Unit 4 paper it was 56/90 and 51/90 for an A, I think. 38/60 for an A on unit 3.
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    (Original post by El_Sid)
    That seems fairly easy... The grade boundries last year were ridiculously low. For an A* in the Unit 4 paper it was 56/90 and 51/90 for an A, I think. 38/60 for an A on unit 3.
    ...I don't want to speak too soon, but that's EXACTLY what I thought. Then again could that be because it's a fairly new specification?
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    (Original post by briesandwich)
    ...I don't want to speak too soon, but that's EXACTLY what I thought. Then again could that be because it's a fairly new specification?
    I do hope you're rig, and that it'll be that easy this year too!
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    (Original post by briesandwich)
    ...I don't want to speak too soon, but that's EXACTLY what I thought. Then again could that be because it's a fairly new specification?
    I suppose so. Everyone who took it at my school last year didn't do too well at all, and there were some people went went on to study Medicine and Psych at Bristol... so I dunno. It doesn't seem hard at all.
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    Ok, so we had a new psychology teacher this year, and she was pants. Our whole class is worrying about the clinical part of the exam, because all she did was give us sheets, which were really badly organised, and her spelling is awful so half of them don't make sense.

    Half the stuff of the syllabus we havent been taught....

    So for my first question! Does anyone have a more concise definition of abnormality (statistical & social norm).

    Thanksss!
    Also, notes and model answers would be awesome if anyone has any! ;P
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    (Original post by dorkish)
    Ok, so we had a new psychology teacher this year, and she was pants. Our whole class is worrying about the clinical part of the exam, because all she did was give us sheets, which were really badly organised, and her spelling is awful so half of them don't make sense.

    Half the stuff of the syllabus we havent been taught....

    So for my first question! Does anyone have a more concise definition of abnormality (statistical & social norm).

    Thanksss!
    Also, notes and model answers would be awesome if anyone has any! ;P
    I'm just about to leave to go out for the day, but I will write up what I have when I get back.

    I know what you mean though. I dno't know half of issues and debates, because of my new,crap teacher.
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    (Original post by lozzyhickers)
    I'm just about to leave to go out for the day, but I will write up what I have when I get back.

    I know what you mean though. I dno't know half of issues and debates, because of my new,crap teacher.
    Same. :sigh: I'm going to be having kittens when I get to the Issues and Debates section of the exam. :cry:

    (Original post by dorkish)
    Ok, so we had a new psychology teacher this year, and she was pants. Our whole class is worrying about the clinical part of the exam, because all she did was give us sheets, which were really badly organised, and her spelling is awful so half of them don't make sense.

    Half the stuff of the syllabus we havent been taught....

    So for my first question! Does anyone have a more concise definition of abnormality (statistical & social norm).

    Thanksss!
    Also, notes and model answers would be awesome if anyone has any! ;P
    I'll type up a few notes for you. I recommend www.psychexchange.co.uk for resources on edexcel psychology, I've noticed my teacher gets half of her worksheets from there. :teehee:


    Statistical Definition

    • If someone falls two standard deviations or more away from the mean they are considered statistically abnormal.
    • 'Abnormality' is understood as anything that is statistically infrequent.
    • It helps to know about normal distribution (the normal distribution curve). A characteristic of behaviour is seen as normally distributed if the mean average, mode and median all fall in the same place.
    • For example, the IQ average is 100. The standard deviation is 15, and therefore anyone who has an IQ of below 70 or over 130 is considered abnormal.


    Evaluation of the statistical definition

    - It gives a quantitative measure that is objective, which is therefore more reliable and suitable when making consistent diagnoses.
    - On a practical level this definition of abnormality is useful for requests of assistance and funding for those identified as it is accepted as more scientific.
    - It ignores the desirability of some abnormalities. (An IQ of 130 is statistically abnormal but socially desirable.)
    - As the cut off points are so blunt, the child with an IQ of 69 would get extra help in class, but the child with an IQ of 71 would not. This is unfair, and impractical.
    - The cut off point has no contextual meaning.


    Social Norms Definition

    • This is defined as unusual behaviour outside of the social norms.
    • Social norms are rules that are not laws, but customs and people in society abide by such rules in their behaviour.
    • This means that in different cultures, different behaviours are likely to be abnormal. For example, in Africa hearing voices is considered normal but in our society it would be considered a symptom of psychosis.
    • An example of someone 'abnormal' by the social norms definition: A person walking down the street is thinking they're being followed. They're talking to them self. They are having a psychotic episode.


    Evaluation of Social Norms Definition

    - It has appeal as we tend to view people with odd behaviour as being abnormal. Those with mental health issues do break social norms fairly often.
    - It explains why different cultures have different ideas about abnormality.
    - Criminals violate social norms, but they are not always thought of as being mentally ill.
    - Treatment of homosexuality as a mental illness is now seen as inappropriate in the UK, but not in previous DSM's.


    I'm sorry it's so rushed and not in much depth, I have work in a bit.
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    (Original post by briesandwich)
    Same. :sigh: I'm going to be having kittens when I get to the Issues and Debates section of the exam. :cry:



    I'll type up a few notes for you. I recommend www.psychexchange.co.uk for resources on edexcel psychology, I've noticed my teacher gets half of her worksheets from there. :teehee:


    Statistical Definition

    • If someone falls two standard deviations or more away from the mean they are considered statistically abnormal.
    • 'Abnormality' is understood as anything that is statistically infrequent.
    • It helps to know about normal distribution (the normal distribution curve). A characteristic of behaviour is seen as normally distributed if the mean average, mode and median all fall in the same place.
    • For example, the IQ average is 100. The standard deviation is 15, and therefore anyone who has an IQ of below 70 or over 130 is considered abnormal.


    Evaluation of the statistical definition

    - It gives a quantitative measure that is objective, which is therefore more reliable and suitable when making consistent diagnoses.
    - On a practical level this definition of abnormality is useful for requests of assistance and funding for those identified as it is accepted as more scientific.
    - It ignores the desirability of some abnormalities. (An IQ of 130 is statistically abnormal but socially desirable.)
    - As the cut off points are so blunt, the child with an IQ of 69 would get extra help in class, but the child with an IQ of 71 would not. This is unfair, and impractical.
    - The cut off point has no contextual meaning.


    Social Norms Definition

    • This is defined as unusual behaviour outside of the social norms.
    • Social norms are rules that are not laws, but customs and people in society abide by such rules in their behaviour.
    • This means that in different cultures, different behaviours are likely to be abnormal. For example, in Africa hearing voices is considered normal but in our society it would be considered a symptom of psychosis.
    • An example of someone 'abnormal' by the social norms definition: A person walking down the street is thinking they're being followed. They're talking to them self. They are having a psychotic episode.


    Evaluation of Social Norms Definition

    - It has appeal as we tend to view people with odd behaviour as being abnormal. Those with mental health issues do break social norms fairly often.
    - It explains why different cultures have different ideas about abnormality.
    - Criminals violate social norms, but they are not always thought of as being mentally ill.
    - Treatment of homosexuality as a mental illness is now seen as inappropriate in the UK, but not in previous DSM's.


    I'm sorry it's so rushed and not in much depth, I have work in a bit.
    I was going to add more, but this pretty much all I have too lol.
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    I've typed up ALL of my notes on Issues and Debates if anyone wants them. They're 44 pages long..should be fun revising
    How far has everyone got with their revision? I'm done and dusted with Unit 3, and finished Clinical last night and just started Issues and Debates today. Don't know if I'll be able to finish that in time for the exam..the content is just toooooooo long!
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    (Original post by Nadima)
    I've typed up ALL of my notes on Issues and Debates if anyone wants them. They're 44 pages long..should be fun revising
    How far has everyone got with their revision? I'm done and dusted with Unit 3, and finished Clinical last night and just started Issues and Debates today. Don't know if I'll be able to finish that in time for the exam..the content is just toooooooo long!
    :eek: I would LOVE them if you don't mind sharing!

    I've finished for criminal, nearly finished revising child (Only Bowlby's 44 thieves study to go...Genie is easy to remember because of how sad it is. ) and then I'll be doing Issues and Debates and Clinical. Hopefully I'll finish those two before Friday so I can recap unit 3 yet again.
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    (Original post by dorkish)
    Ok, so we had a new psychology teacher this year, and she was pants. Our whole class is worrying about the clinical part of the exam, because all she did was give us sheets, which were really badly organised, and her spelling is awful so half of them don't make sense.

    Half the stuff of the syllabus we havent been taught....

    So for my first question! Does anyone have a more concise definition of abnormality (statistical & social norm).

    Thanksss!
    Also, notes and model answers would be awesome if anyone has any! ;P
    Deviation from social norms - Social norms are guidelines for acceptable or appropriate behaviour. A person who breaks social norms or violates a person's sense of right and wrong is considered abnormal. Abnormality consists of behaviour that is not normally acceptable and can make people feel uncomfortable when they see the behaviour. Abnormality is behaviour that is bizarre or out of the ordinary - it is not traditional, social behaviour. It has to be clear to everyone what social norms are so they can differentiate between what type of behaviour is seen as normal or abnormal. What is considered as breaking social norms is defined by the society one is in and so the culture is dependent on this. For example, people who have antisocial personality disorder tend to be aggressive, commit crime and feel no guilt or remorse for their unacceptable behaviour, so they break social norms.

    Deviation from statistical norms - Anything that occurs rarely is abnormal. This definition can be used when dealing with human characteristics that can be reliably measured, for example, anxiety and depression. Most people's behaviour clusters around the mean/average. As we move further away from the average, fewer people display this behaviour and so are deemed abnormal. Individual characteristics such as personality and behaviour are measured and compared to the distribution of these characteristics within a population. For example, the average IQ is 100. 95% of the population have an average IQ between 70 and 130. 2.5% have an IQ below 70 and 2.5% have an IQ above 130 and so are deemed abnormal, as they fall into the extreme 5% of the population. Only 1% of the population have schizophrenia and so are deemed abnormal. Anything that falls outside the 2 standard deviations of the average is considered abnormal. For example, being really tall is seen as abnormal as it is above average.

    Both of these definitions are enough to get you 5 marks each in the exam..5 marks will probably be the maximum they ask for in the exam and the evaluation points are pretty much the same as stated by the person who quoted you before.
    Hope this helps..feel free to ask anything else
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    (Original post by briesandwich)
    :eek: I would LOVE them if you don't mind sharing!

    I've finished for criminal, nearly finished revising child (Only Bowlby's 44 thieves study to go...Genie is easy to remember because of how sad it is. ) and then I'll be doing Issues and Debates and Clinical. Hopefully I'll finish those two before Friday so I can recap unit 3 yet again.
    In the same position as you I'd love to share my Unit 3 notes and Clinical notes with everyone alongside my Issues and Debates notes, but sadly, I hand wrote them and my writing's really small, so it's not of much use. Ermmmmm, I'm a bit dopy..how do I attach LOL
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    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    Exactly the same! Haha thats weird!!

    It was ok I didn't do that good so I'm resitting it in June. There are so many studies!! How do you remember them all? Have you finished being taught on everything then in school?
    Aww, I hope you do well in June. I had a look at the January paper for Unit 3 cus my teachers gave us a copy, but the paper seemed pretty easy and straightforward. I wish they had that paper for this summer!
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    I have a copy of the January 2011 paper if anybody wants it
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    (Original post by Nadima)
    I have a copy of the January 2011 paper if anybody wants it
    Thanks Nadima, but I posted it on a previous page
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    (Original post by Nadima)
    I've typed up ALL of my notes on Issues and Debates if anyone wants them. They're 44 pages long..should be fun revising
    How far has everyone got with their revision? I'm done and dusted with Unit 3, and finished Clinical last night and just started Issues and Debates today. Don't know if I'll be able to finish that in time for the exam..the content is just toooooooo long!
    Omd please could you send me your issues and debates notes. My teacher has taught us nothing for that....and I have like no notes.:plz2::plz2::plz2:
    Major +rep
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    (Original post by Nadima)
    Aww, I hope you do well in June. I had a look at the January paper for Unit 3 cus my teachers gave us a copy, but the paper seemed pretty easy and straightforward. I wish they had that paper for this summer!
    Oh I didn't even see this. Thanks I hope you do well! Hope we all do well.
    Yeah the paper wasn't too bad in Jan. I just wasn't prepared. I had bio and chem the same week and it was just a mess. Lol. Hope this friday goes better
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    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    Oh I didn't even see this. Thanks I hope you do well! Hope we all do well.
    Yeah the paper wasn't too bad in Jan. I just wasn't prepared. I had bio and chem the same week and it was just a mess. Lol. Hope this friday goes better
    Yeahh, hopefully it will! I hope the essay question is an easy one. I have a feeling the key issue/evidence of practice will come up for Child as it hasn't come up at all in the past papers, so just keep your eye on that one incase it comes up
    I've attached my unit 4 revision notes for you too here
    I REALLY hope this helps..feel free to ask me anything as I've written it in the context that best works for me and there's a few tips around my notes that I've put in there such as how to plan an essay on a particular topic in the exam.
    I'm really sorry if it doesn't help..sorry if it's not of any use! But hopefully, it will help cus everyone pretty much learns the same stuff for Issues and Debates, exccept some of the studies you may have learnt are different. Good luck though and let me know if my notes were useful
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc Unit 4 revision notes.doc (747.5 KB, 111 views)
 
 
 
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