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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    Aha, I used a quadratic solver, which gave the second root as 0.3000000000004, for some reason. Anyway, its all good.
    What's that?
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    Haha
    It's a big deal for me, I'm taking this exam in May.

    [SIZE="2"]Not that big a deal, but still happy I got it[/SIZE]
    Yep I'm sitting this exam this summer...statistics have been pretty easy so far, but some of my classmates took the exam in January and they got between 60 and 80..I'm kinda freaking out now :| Thank God I'm smart hehe
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    (Original post by Maths_Lover)
    What's that?
    I typed in quadratic solver on google, and it was just some website.

    If you take a quadratic as

    ax^2 + bx + c =0

    you just input the values for a, b, and c into the solver, and it gives you the value of the discriminant and the real roots of the equation. Same as what you get on a graphical calculator really
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    (Original post by Legen...dary!!)
    Yep I'm sitting this exam this summer...statistics have been pretty easy so far, but some of my classmates took the exam in January and they got between 60 and 80..I'm kinda freaking out now :| Thank God I'm smart hehe
    Yikes. How did you get on in January?
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    Sorry to intrude on this thread, but is this the standard of an average question in S1? We get questions like this for GCSE, and I thought S1 was meant to be rather difficult...

    (Original post by Straight up G)
    I think your scenario one doesn't exist. Once she's succeeded, she doesn't have to jump again. And so 2 doesnt exist either.
    Also, wouldn't P(scenario 1) + P(scenario 2) equal 0.6 anyway, meaning it doesn't really matter either way?
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    (Original post by Legen...dary!!)
    Yep I'm sitting this exam this summer...statistics have been pretty easy so far, but some of my classmates took the exam in January and they got between 60 and 80..I'm kinda freaking out now :| Thank God I'm smart hehe
    Haha it's fairly straightforward but the grade boundaries are quite low because its easy to go wrong, and very easy to choose the wrong option in those ridiculous combinations/permutations questions. Apparently S2 is far, far easier than S1.
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    I typed in quadratic solver on google, and it was just some website.

    If you take a quadratic as

    ax^2 + bx + c =0

    you just input the values for a, b, and c into the solver, and it gives you the value of the discriminant and the real roots of the equation. Same as what you get on a graphical calculator really
    Aaah. I see.

    Why would you want to do that though - surely solving it with pencil and paper is faster and more rewarding (not to mention more fun )?
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    (Original post by und)
    Sorry to intrude on this thread, but is this the standard of an average question on S1? We get questions like this for GCSE, and I thought S1 was meant to be rather difficult...



    Also, wouldn't P(scenario 1) + P(scenario 2) equal 0.6 anyway, meaning it doesn't really matter either way?
    S1 is not conceptually difficult. It's just choosing the right method and not getting confused. It's very easy to do so. If there's ever an exam where you should go back and do each question again/check answers, its S1. You'll see what I mean when you do combinations/permutations. It's probably a standard question 1/2 on a paper of 9/10 questions. The first part is very standard, the second part is a little more difficult but standard as well.

    Yes, but it's irrelevant because scenario 1 doesn't exist, and scenario two only partially exists. It just over-complicates.
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    (Original post by Maths_Lover)
    Aaah. I see.

    Why would you want to do that though - surely solving it with pencil and paper is faster and more rewarding (not to mention more fun )?
    In all honesty, I never saw 0.51 as 51/100, and had a brain freeze when i thought about what I could multiply it to. I thought it was one of those questions with a really long complicated root.

    It's definitely faster and more rewarding.
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    (Original post by Maths_Lover)
    Yikes. How did you get on in January?
    I didn't have exams in January cz I had a Cambridge interview so everything else was a bit pointless haha Btw I'm planning not to take the FP2 and FP3 exams this summer, so I'll just have statistics Alevel, cz I already have 4 exams in 3 days and my schedule's kinda hectic (with pure it'd be 6 exams in 3 days) What do you think I should do?? :/ My friend told me to go to the exam even if I haven't studied but then I'd be wasting time from studying for the rest of my exams.

    Wow I just saw you're 15..ok you don't have to answer XD
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    Haha it's fairly straightforward but the grade boundaries are quite low because its easy to go wrong, and very easy to choose the wrong option in those ridiculous combinations/permutations questions. Apparently S2 is far, far easier than S1.
    I hope so.. I need to get a 95 there if I'm gonna get an A*...these are some stressful times
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    (Original post by und)
    Sorry to intrude on this thread, but is this the standard of an average question in S1? We get questions like this for GCSE, and I thought S1 was meant to be rather difficult...



    Also, wouldn't P(scenario 1) + P(scenario 2) equal 0.6 anyway, meaning it doesn't really matter either way?
    Yes, it does. I realised that a bit earlier but thought that there was not much point in re-correcting myself.
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    (Original post by Legen...dary!!)
    I hope so.. I need to get a 95 there if I'm gonna get an A*...these are some stressful times
    Good luck. Hope you get it.
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    In all honesty, I never saw 0.51 as 51/100, and had a brain freeze when i thought about what I could multiply it to. I thought it was one of those questions with a really long complicated root.

    It's definitely faster and more rewarding.
    OK. I was wondering. Looks like we both need some rest.

    (Original post by Legen...dary!!)
    I didn't have exams in January cz I had a Cambridge interview so everything else was a bit pointless haha Btw I'm planning not to take the FP2 and FP3 exams this summer, so I'll just have statistics Alevel, cz I already have 4 exams in 3 days and my schedule's kinda hectic (with pure it'd be 6 exams in 3 days) What do you think I should do?? :/ My friend told me to go to the exam even if I haven't studied but then I'd be wasting time from studying for the rest of my exams.
    Ooh. I thought you were in Year 12. What degree did you apply for and how did the interview go?

    About the exams: you might as well turn up for the exams and get some marks than not turn up and get 0, I reckon. If you can, study like crazy over this Easter holiday. Good luck!
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    Good luck. Hope you get it.
    Thanks and to you too
 
 
 
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