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    At any one time, there will be a thread about how the thread starter failed to get onto a Primary PGCE course, why is Primary so heavily oversubscribed? So many people are banging their heads on the wall and failing.

    I dare say applicants trying their hand at Secondary Maths, Physics, Chemistry would have an easier time of it.
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    (Original post by The-Real-One)
    At any one time, there will be a thread about how the thread starter failed to get onto a Primary PGCE course, why is Primary so heavily oversubscribed? So many people are banging their heads on the wall and failing.

    I dare say applicants trying their hand at Secondary Maths, Physics, Chemistry would have an easier time of it.
    Some people want to work with young children, I suppose.

    I would personally rather teach secondary than spend every evening scrubbing glitter glue and oil paints out of my hair but whatever floats their boat!
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    (Original post by The-Real-One)
    At any one time, there will be a thread about how the thread starter failed to get onto a Primary PGCE course, why is Primary so heavily oversubscribed? So many people are banging their heads on the wall and failing.

    I dare say applicants trying their hand at Secondary Maths, Physics, Chemistry would have an easier time of it.

    I think it's the age group - people maybe think it's the easier option?!
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    I think at the moment with a lot of people losing jobs and being unemployed, most people are trying to get into safe careers, eg teaching. So all teacher training courses will be oversubscribed right now. Also, teaching primary is easier than teaching secondary (less marking to do in your own time too!) and it's easier to get into if you don't have a national curriculum related degree.
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    less marking? Maybe in terms of the amount each child does per lesson, but you've got 4/5 lessons each day to mark, often including the lessons that you weren't teaching due to non-contact time (altho it does vary school to school). I'm not saying that secondary is 'easier' - more that each has its own challenges/benefits etc

    The fact is, that someone with a chemistry degree (for example) is open to apply for a primary PGCE, as well as a secondary chemistry one. Equally, they may not want to go into teaching at all. You've got a much larger potential pool of applicants (anyone with a degree) for primary, whereas only people with chemistry as part or all of their degree (altho there are probably some exceptional circumstances too)
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    (Original post by The-Real-One)
    At any one time, there will be a thread about how the thread starter failed to get onto a Primary PGCE course, why is Primary so heavily oversubscribed? So many people are banging their heads on the wall and failing.

    I dare say applicants trying their hand at Secondary Maths, Physics, Chemistry would have an easier time of it.
    Teaching is seen by some as a 'safe' career. There will always be a demand for teachers, especially primary teachers. In today's society where it is nigh on im possible to get a job in many sectors, people choose teaching for good job security.

    As with primary specifically, many people think that it will be easier than secondary school, which is some ways it is, but in many ways it is not. Young children need a lot of patience, and particularly if one teaches lower primary then there will be lots of tears and tantrums on a daily basis!

    In general though, teaching is a very fullfilling and rewarding career and for that reason many pick it. Some would also rather do primary because you teach a wide, broad and balanced curriculum, whilst in a high school/college you would only teach one (in some cases two) subject.
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    What ever anyone says,everyone has heard or read about the horror stories of 15 year old boys hitting their teacher,but it is rare to read such things about primary.This being the case,many think,at least I will deal with nice children & this may not always be true but the fear factor goes! In some ways,Middle schools is the best option:you are a Specialist,but you teach those of primary age.

    Many I feel really are stuck in two positions:wanting to teach their subject,but the thought of trying to teach those who on the whole are regarded by many as unteachable makes Primary their choice.Primary schools are small & Secondary are not,so the first time you walk into one with 1500 students & a huge hall,it is nothing but a fearful experience,whereas Primary is nice & small,which rarely goes beyond 500 & in Infant schools can be a mere 150 children.

    I have experience of both & I could apply for Secondary now,but to qualify for Primary,I have a GCSE laocking.The competition is strong,just think about it;Primary applications close in December,whereas many Secondary are still open in June the following year! I was a HLTA where I had 20 hours teaching RE & Citizenship in a rather tough school with racial problems & most of the classes I taught,a teacher was called in to assist with the bad behaviour in the classroom,even the Year 7's,which the previous year were in primary.I,at present have done 3 months fulltime placement in an Infant school & now I volunteer 1 day per week as well as other things when it comes up as well as serving as a Governor.From the experiences,I was nervous & I did not feel comfortable in the Secondary school,but in the Infant school I do.I think you need to be comfortable,but I have seen 30 6 year olds misbehave which is hard as you cannot scream at them,but in the Secondary school i was in,the other teachers were always screaming & it shot my nerves to bits as a result.Also in the secondary school I was called every 4 lettered name you can think of!

    Before I make my decision,I think there is one think that many forget;in Upper Primary you begin to see the characters appearing that are common in Secondary schools along with the behaviour.Becoming a Primary school teacher is one thing,but you may be only able to get a job with the 8 year olds with their attitudes & if it is in a rough area,it will no better than the worse Secondary school.

    With more vacancies & less applicants for Secondary,there is a good chance that you can apply & get a job in the type of school & in the area you want.

    The other thought is,while many are passion about their subject,it is fear that stops them from gooing down the Secondary road,but in theory you get your PGCE/PGDE to teach & so you can switch,as long as you can get a school that will take you, compared to those who come down the Primary route!

    I have taught Adults in many settings,I have been in different schools now,but Istill do not know the real answer to the question,just that for men,Secondary is the expected route & in many secondary schools most are men.As for the work load,i know of both areas of teachers & neither have less to do,just that Secondary are Specialist & therefore in theory already know their subject,so the preparation can be less,but as a Generalist in Primary,you really do rely on Lesson Plans as no one knows all the subjects,but then you knowledge is a lesser level,which can be a hardone when teaching GCSE/A level where the children know what they are talking about & can catch you out,but do not be fooled by the "cute Look" of infants as they can refuse to do their work,be quiet,sit in silence,sit up,do as they are told etc... as any child in Secondary.
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    Because a few years ago it was hideously undersubscribed, especially by males, so it was a pretty good job opportunity.
    Then word spread and it snowballed. Now it's oversubscribed.
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    You are so wrong about the amount of marking primary teachers have to do, and so are the universities for taking on all these students. Landing them with a load of debt, and for what, when they cannot get a job at the end of it all. My son has been working for agencies ever since he qualified, and every job he goes after there are 70 - 100 applicants all after the one job. Its ridiculous and also extremely degrading for any young man with all the education and no jobs at the end of it. He has a business degree and 3 years experience in retail management working in London. He is certainly not afraid to travel or live away from home but not on the promise of casual jobs from agencies, as he just could not afford eat and to pay the rent. Any good ideas would be gratefully received. My nieces teach Secondary children but they only teach there own specific subjects. In Primary you have to teach all the curriculum and mark it before you go home so its certainly not a 9:00 -3:30 job if you want to make a good teacher. This government is now trying to devalue the PGCE Qualification that these young people have worked so hard to earn as it is not an easy course and a lot of people drop out part way through it.
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    (Original post by The-Real-One)
    At any one time, there will be a thread about how the thread starter failed to get onto a Primary PGCE course, why is Primary so heavily oversubscribed? So many people are banging their heads on the wall and failing.

    I dare say applicants trying their hand at Secondary Maths, Physics, Chemistry would have an easier time of it.
    Primary PGCE has been over-subscribed for a while, as far as I am aware, which is at least since 2005. It's a popular career choice with many benefits! I also think it's something many people can access as said previously, you just can have practically any undergrad degree to apply so that increases the application pool significantly.

    I disagree with those who say secondary is more difficult, I think the challenges are different but I wouldn't like say one is harder than the other. Even within the primary age range the expectations are different. It's not something you can really compare, marking isn't and shouldn't be used as he gate post for the work load.
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    It might be the appeal of it being 'easier', but thinking about it the secondary age range is broken down into loads of different subjects, where as primary only has the one. Surely that has a massive impact on numbers. Those who really like teaching 11-16/18 have at least 14 different subjects they can apply to specialize in.
 
 
 
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