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Will I get NHS treatment for this? watch

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    (Original post by Bubbles0ox)
    Go and ask, wont go into detail because ill be repped but i had a problem which was defneilty considered 'cosmetic' and i got it sorted on the NHS
    they base it on the indiviudal
    he said to me that because im young, a girl, etc etc (not going into detail) that i could get it done.
    Well that's deffo comforting! I'm young and a girl so I wonder if I'd be available for the same. Do you mind me asking, was your treatment to do with skincare or was it something else?
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    (Original post by qwerty7)
    Well that's deffo comforting! I'm young and a girl so I wonder if I'd be available for the same. Do you mind me asking, was your treatment to do with skincare or was it something else?
    something different, but ive PM'd you
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    (Original post by qwerty7)
    Something to do with flu, or some sickness problem in the general area which means I can't get an appointment in the next few days when I'm available, so I've got to wait until my next day off work/college, which isn't until a few weeks time sadly!

    OK, my friend said the same thing but I'm still unsure as to whether they would spend the money on scar treatments for me or not. Guess I'll just have to wait until my appointment to see!
    Thanks for the advice!
    Ahhhh okay.

    Well it's definatly worth a try. I've read 100's of story about the NHS paying for things like breast enlargements and other more trivial "conditions", because the GPs thought that it's causing destress/depression in the patient.
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    Honestly, nobody who has actually had acne would think of this as a trivial or unnecessary procedure. I know I'm likely to get "negged" for this and frankly I don't care - if you haven't had this problem then count yourselves as winners of the genetic lottery rather than morally superior beings.

    If the acne or scarring is on your face then of course it will impact on how you see yourself and how other people respond to you. I've gone from having acne-prone, to eczema-prone to now (thank goodness) perfectly clear skin. It's hardly a coincidence that I've also gone from having no confidence to socialise or put myself forward for opportunities which would involve public speaking or networking to making the most of every chance I get to meet new people and improve my career prospects. I know that having dodgy skin is nothing compared to having a serious illness and I did know at the time that I should be pushing myself outside of my comfort zone - but it's very difficult to do that when people are constantly looking at your skin and either judging or pitying you (often openly). I've also gone in this time from fretting about my relationship constantly because I felt that I wasn't "good enough" for my boyfriend (again, despite knowing at the time how irrational that was) to feeling fully secure in that respect too. The point I'm trying to make is that facial disfigurements instill insecurity because they are impossible to hide, and insecurity takes control away from you. You're no longer in charge of your own feelings, self-perception or wants; everything is tainted by self-consciousness and feelings of inferiority. And I didn't need therapy to eradicate that, the first week of having good skin was enough.

    If getting your scarring sorted out will have a similar impact on you then you must seek whatever help you need to achieve it. Explain to your doctor clearly all of the ways in which it impacts on your mental wellbeing and your quality of life - all of the things you feel you cannot do and the consequences of that, and all of the things you feel you have to do which are making you unhappy. GPs will only help you if they feel that the need is not just genuine but more pressing than the needs of other applicants for procedures. There's only a finite amount of money to go around and while some is being spent on removing birthmarks from knees and straightening people's noses you should feel no remorse. You'll be paying taxes in a few years and professionals almost never get out of the NHS what they put into it. I wonder how many of the people who oppose this procedure on principle had a problem with their friends getting NHS braces as teenagers to straighten out malformations which were purely cosmetic? That is widely regarded as a normal and even expected procedure so I don't understand why this should be any different.

    I wish you all the best

    EDIT: And if the first doctor says no, give it a month and book an appointment with a different one. Some doctors are just unsympathetic.
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    You can try but they might still make you pay just at a lesser fee. Dunno why you would tbh, lmaoo £1000 for microdermabrasion :confused: it's just tougher exfoliating, you can buy microdermabrasion kits from any shop. Doing acid peels is much better though, just start on a low percentage and work your way up. You should also be incorporating a skincare regime based around treating your scarring. Key words are 'brightening', 'evening', 'clarifying', 'toning' etc. when it comes to scar healing in beauty products.
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    I had a scar that really hated and went to my doctor about it and he asked a few questions decided that my answers fit the criteria and referred me straight to a plastic surgeon.
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    (Original post by sorafdfs)
    You can try but they might still make you pay just at a lesser fee. Dunno why you would tbh, lmaoo £1000 for microdermabrasion :confused: it's just tougher exfoliating, you can buy microdermabrasion kits from any shop. Doing acid peels is much better though, just start on a low percentage and work your way up. You should also be incorporating a skincare regime based around treating your scarring. Key words are 'brightening', 'evening', 'clarifying', 'toning' etc. when it comes to scar healing in beauty products.
    I doubt micro dermabrasion kits you can buy in the shops are any where near as effective as getting it done properly and the acid peels definitely aren't they completely remove a layer of skin. and when I say a layer of skin I don't mean the dead skin that would come away anyway I mean like a tattoo is on a different layer of skin that would otherwise never surface. people who have proper skin peels are advised to wear high factor sun cream every day for the rest of their lives
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    Bio oil is really good for scars but it is quite expensive. If there is a wilkinsons where you live they have their own version of it which is pretty much identical. It's called soft smooth reduce or something along those lines, it's right next to the bio oil in the wilkinsons where i live.
    I have scars from dog bites on my stomach and it helped reduce them so its worth a shot!
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    (Original post by MsAnnThropic)
    Honestly, nobody who has actually had acne would think of this as a trivial or unnecessary procedure. I know I'm likely to get "negged" for this and frankly I don't care - if you haven't had this problem then count yourselves as winners of the genetic lottery rather than morally superior beings.

    If the acne or scarring is on your face then of course it will impact on how you see yourself and how other people respond to you. I've gone from having acne-prone, to eczema-prone to now (thank goodness) perfectly clear skin. It's hardly a coincidence that I've also gone from having no confidence to socialise or put myself forward for opportunities which would involve public speaking or networking to making the most of every chance I get to meet new people and improve my career prospects. I know that having dodgy skin is nothing compared to having a serious illness and I did know at the time that I should be pushing myself outside of my comfort zone - but it's very difficult to do that when people are constantly looking at your skin and either judging or pitying you (often openly). I've also gone in this time from fretting about my relationship constantly because I felt that I wasn't "good enough" for my boyfriend (again, despite knowing at the time how irrational that was) to feeling fully secure in that respect too. The point I'm trying to make is that facial disfigurements instill insecurity because they are impossible to hide, and insecurity takes control away from you. You're no longer in charge of your own feelings, self-perception or wants; everything is tainted by self-consciousness and feelings of inferiority. And I didn't need therapy to eradicate that, the first week of having good skin was enough.

    If getting your scarring sorted out will have a similar impact on you then you must seek whatever help you need to achieve it. Explain to your doctor clearly all of the ways in which it impacts on your mental wellbeing and your quality of life - all of the things you feel you cannot do and the consequences of that, and all of the things you feel you have to do which are making you unhappy. GPs will only help you if they feel that the need is not just genuine but more pressing than the needs of other applicants for procedures. There's only a finite amount of money to go around and while some is being spent on removing birthmarks from knees and straightening people's noses you should feel no remorse. You'll be paying taxes in a few years and professionals almost never get out of the NHS what they put into it. I wonder how many of the people who oppose this procedure on principle had a problem with their friends getting NHS braces as teenagers to straighten out malformations which were purely cosmetic? That is widely regarded as a normal and even expected procedure so I don't understand why this should be any different.

    I wish you all the best

    EDIT: And if the first doctor says no, give it a month and book an appointment with a different one. Some doctors are just unsympathetic.
    Thanks for your answer! It's really nice to hear from someone who has an idea about how I'm feeling. Like I said before I really don't see myself as more deserving of treatment than others, but I do think I deserve to feel good about myself! Thanks for your advice, I'll give it my best shot!
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    Possibly if it's severely impacted your quality of life psychologically. I have acne scars and did pay for treatment, but then they were not affecting me so badly. I do however think you need to be realistic about what treatments can do in terms of scarring, often you will get an improvement but not a complete eradication of acne scars. Anyway I'm sure the scars don't look half as bad to other people as they do to you, we are so much harsher on ourselves.

    In the meantime, you can consider topicals such as vitamin c and glycolic acid to help break up the scar tissue and repair damaged collagen.

    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by qwerty7)
    Hey guys. Basically I have really, really awful acne scars left from 5-6 years of serious acne. It's awful and it makes me very self conscious, especially because I can't hide it in make-up and it shows up on almost every picture.

    I don't want to go into huge detail about the psychological affects it has on me, just basically I often cry about it and I always wear makeup every day and night to hide it.
    I wish I had nice skin, because I don't know anyone who has the same skin problems as me, and I can't possibly imagine myself as being attractive with all this rubbish on my face!

    I was wondering whether it would be possible to get treatment on the NHS? The reason I'm asking here is that I can't make an appointment for the GP until a few weeks and I'm really wanting a quick answer, and also one website said the cost for treatment could be £500-£10000 which I can't afford for myself, so I'm very anxious.
    People get turned down by the NHS for cancer pills which save/prolong their lives. I don’t think they will pay for you to get your scars removed. EVERYONE has hang ups about their body but we can’t all go around asking for the tax payer to cough up and pay. I know a four year old girl who’s parents are struggling to afford her artificial leg replacement. The NHS can’t justify spending that money on someone who “is upset about having bad skin” very few people have perfect skin, very few women go out of the house without makeup. Thats just life.
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    Wearing makeup at night isn't going to do you any favours, if you're not with your friends you need to be taking all your makeup off and cleansing really well to keep your skin clean
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    This has nothing to do with your primary question, I just feel I should note... don't beat yourself up about the way you look. Genuine people will judge you for who you are, not what you look like. The people judging your appearance aren't worth the time anyway.
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    Go to your gp and they might tell you what you can use to reduce the them.
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    (Original post by jennafifi)
    People get turned down by the NHS for cancer pills which save/prolong their lives. I don’t think they will pay for you to get your scars removed. EVERYONE has hang ups about their body but we can’t all go around asking for the tax payer to cough up and pay. I know a four year old girl who’s parents are struggling to afford her artificial leg replacement. The NHS can’t justify spending that money on someone who “is upset about having bad skin” very few people have perfect skin, very few women go out of the house without makeup. Thats just life.
    If you had taken the few minutes to actually read my comments then we wouldn't be having this discussion.

    Doctors have to choose between cost: benefit and I don't really worry myself of what a narrow-minded person like you seems to think. The doctors obviously believe it's a worthwhile case which would significantly increase my quality of life, as they have agreed to remove the scars through treatment. Whether or not you think it means anything doesn't matter.
    As for the cancer pills/artificial leg argument, the NHS isn't just there to help save lives but to make lives better. Thousands of people qualify for treatment every week and I am one of them. The treatment will help to make my life better and isn't just a simple 'hang up' about my face. Whether the NHS has decided against treatment for a cancer patient isn't my fault, nor is it my choice.

    Also, the fact that you describe it as 'just life' goes to show how ignorant you are. I'm not describing teenage spots but something which genuinely affects my well being, to the point where I feel suicidal or depressed on a regular basis. Scars and disfigurements on the facial area are hugely detrimental to self confidence and self esteem, and I don't assume that someone who has not experienced anything like this would ever sympathise with me.

    All I can say is thank god you yourself aren't in a position to decide what treatments goes to who.
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    Micro-dermabrasion, twice a week for six weeks. it will improve the scarring soo much. you can go to colleges to get it done cheaply, like 20 quid a treatment. It really helped me with scarring on my hands, you should try it.
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    I wonder how people saying NHS money should only be used for medical emergencies had free braces as a child?

    Having wonky teeth will not of casued 95% of these people health problems, so the brace was a cosmetic treatment. How is girl wanting to get acne scars which obviously seriously affect her confidence any different ?

    Personally i think they will and SHOULD do it on the NHS. people pay taxes to have good healthcare, this doesnt mean you should only use this care if your heads hanging off.
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    (Original post by Dec S 92)
    I wonder how people saying NHS money should only be used for medical emergencies had free braces as a child?

    Having wonky teeth will not of casued 95% of these people health problems, so the brace was a cosmetic treatment. How is girl wanting to get acne scars which obviously seriously affect her confidence any different ?

    Personally i think they will and SHOULD do it on the NHS. people pay taxes to have good healthcare, this doesnt mean you should only use this care if your heads hanging off.
    I didn't have braces (all my dental care is done privately anyway, but that's besides the point).

    But then I don't think the NHS should pay for things that you've got yourself into, i.e. illnesses caused by smoking, alcohol, drugs, obesity where it's very clear that the person made no attempts to stop or seek help before they needed to be operated on, etc. (I'm not saying that the OP got herself into this; I know you can't make yourself get acne, I'm just talking generally).

    I don't care if I get negged madly for saying that.
    If I want something semi-cosmetic done, I'll pay for it privately, and if I have an accident and need treatment for it, I'll have some of the costs covered by medical insurance if necessary. 'Cause, y'know, that's why I have it.
    I'm not saying that we should have a system like the US, just that if people have money to pay for their treatments, they should use it. (And I pay taxes to cover my medical treatment, blah blah - I don't know how much of your taxes actually go to the NHS, but it's probably nowhere near enough to cover the costs of most thing).
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    (Original post by Florence321)
    I pretty much agree with the beginning of that (except alcohol and drugs when it has become a proper addiction/psycological thing) in that people who get themselves into situations, like eating too much and becoming fat, should try and sort it out themselves before expecting the state to sort it out for them. However, acne is completely down to genes and luck and nothing to do with being unclean or what you eat or anything, so it's pretty different and not really relevant.
    Also, not everyone can afford medical insurance or private treatment - it's great if you can, and I think that it's good that it's available as it does take some pressure off the NHS - but the NHS should be there for people who can't afford to pay.
    To other people, it will appear to be a cosmetic issue, but it's actually something that can make a difference to someone's quality of life when they lose so much confidence because of it. It obviously depends on the severity of the case and everything, but I don't think that it should be regarded as unimportant and a vanity issue at all.
    (sorry for the essay...I've had skin problems pretty much my whole life so I feel quite strongly about this!)
    No worries

    Aah, I won't get into the whole paying-for-yourself stuff because it draws on stuff like being employed etc etc and it makes me rant, and I'm trying to chill tonight.

    But I do understand about the acne. I never said it wasn't important, I know that appearance can be incredibly detrimental to peoples' confidence and that impacts their daily life (I have trichotillomania and, well, that knocks my confidence a lot).
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    (Original post by angelbones)
    To be honest.... and I don't mean this in a horrible way or anything, so please please don't take offense... I don't think you should go to the NHS for it.

    There are plenty of things you can do to reduce scars - Bio-oil or dermabrasion, which, while fairly expensive, are nowhere near as expensive as the treatments you've found quoted.

    IMO, you should only go for stuff on the NHS if it's absolutely crucial (i.e. surgery, something to do with your eyes). Just think of how much of the NHS budget must get spent on people saying "ooh, my so-and-so isn't right and it's making me sad, give me surgery please" (This article shows just how extreme it could go). I'm not saying you're doing anything like that but... it's not life-threatening.

    Cheaper treatments can be effective, and you could even try getting therapy to help you become less self-conscious about it.

    Best of luck.
    But the NHS does fund treatment for conditions that have been psychologically damaging, for example if the patient's been bullied a lot because of it and it's making their life miserable. If you're entitled to it, why not take it? Free healthcare is a right, and that includes cosmetic treatment if you've suffered a lot because of whatever you have. For example, children under a certain age can have treatment to remedy unattractively large ears (really large, not just a bit above average), and a variety of treatments are available for people whose teeth are discoloured due to accident. Therapy is not enough because the self consciousness and unattractiveness is never going to go away: I should know. The NHS is not just a safety blanket for people who are on death's door. I agree though that seeking treatment like the example you gave above is totally unnecessary.
 
 
 
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