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    (Original post by Adorno)
    Because our system afford far too much power to the executive at the expense of the legislature. I'm not really bothered by cost so much as the principle of democracy and merit. An elected head of state at least implies that every office in this country is open to those who are good enough to get to that position even if that view is idealistic in reality.

    In any case, if we did rid ourselves of our feudal overlords, it would be a good time to reconsider the executive-legislature divisions and whether we are still comfortable with the primus inter pares nature of the westminster cabinet system.
    I've always been a supporter of, as I believe Plato put it, "Slowly, slowly, catchy monkey." Basically, massive constitutional reform should be done slowly over year, decades even. Which is why I wouldn't support, as some lib dems have suggested, a all encompassing constitutional reform bill. Our constitution is 800 years old, and for the most part it works.

    The point I'm making is that we shouldn't shove loads of different things through at once. Indeed, if we did abolish the monarchy, I'd see that as a last step on the road. Reform parliament first to prepare it for such an event so we minimise problems.

    In addition, and boy am I choosing my words carefully here, too much state-base democracy can be a bad thing. Say we make every facet of government democratic. Both chambers of the legislature, head of state, supreme court, all of which have been argued. Where would ultimate power lie? While all these branches with mandates argue it out, the people will ultimately suffer. That's why constitutional reform must be done very, very carefully.
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    (Original post by Nothos)
    I've always been a supporter of, as I believe Plato put it, "Slowly, slowly, catchy monkey." Basically, massive constitutional reform should be done slowly over year, decades even. Which is why I wouldn't support, as some lib dems have suggested, a all encompassing constitutional reform bill. Our constitution is 800 years old, and for the most part it works.
    No it isn't. Our constitution (such as it is) is not that old and our "democracy" dates only from the 1940s when a universal, single-vote franchise was finally brought into effect with the abolition of the university seats. Britain has often had to effect massive constitutional change very quickly because it takes forever to do things. We are somewhat like the Titanic - massive, powerful but with a rudder unfit for purpose.

    The point I'm making is that we shouldn't shove loads of different things through at once. Indeed, if we did abolish the monarchy, I'd see that as a last step on the road. Reform parliament first to prepare it for such an event so we minimise problems.
    Parliament has been reformed god knows how many times. 1827, 1828, 1832, 1868, 1884, 1885, 1910, 1918, 1928, 1948 ... I could go on. Yet we still end up with the same questions and the same issues. Parliament has ceased to be the solution, parliament is the problem standing in the way. True reform cannot take place until we overhaul our entire political system. This means, in my view, federalism, it means a republic, it means getting rid of inbuilt privileges. It means taking the spirit of reform to its logical conclusion.

    In addition, and boy am I choosing my words carefully here, too much state-base democracy can be a bad thing. Say we make every facet of government democratic. Both chambers of the legislature, head of state, supreme court, all of which have been argued. Where would ultimate power lie? While all these branches with mandates argue it out, the people will ultimately suffer. That's why constitutional reform must be done very, very carefully.
    The people? What people? The ones with vested interests in keeping the system as it is!
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    Sorting out a reading list for the summer when I'm going to force myself to do some proper reading for the first time in years. Resisting the urge to add lots of books to it I don't own yet :emo:

    Anybody else got any summer plans?
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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/pict...-Cai-Yang.html

    Certainly not how we played war games... they even have a bag over the persons head -_-
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    (Original post by paddy__power)
    Anybody else got any summer plans?
    I'll be doing the same if I can find a book list that has books that have been used year after year in International Business BA courses as I'd like to get a head start but no one seems to know

    Otherwise it is work and surfing
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    I'll be doing the same if I can find a book list that has books that have been used year after year in International Business BA courses as I'd like to get a head start but no one seems to know

    Otherwise it is work and surfing
    Just contact someone doing the course and ask what they read in the first year....
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    (Original post by Adorno)
    No it isn't. Our constitution (such as it is) is not that old and our "democracy" dates only from the 1940s when a universal, single-vote franchise was finally brought into effect with the abolition of the university seats. Britain has often had to effect massive constitutional change very quickly because it takes forever to do things. We are somewhat like the Titanic - massive, powerful but with a rudder unfit for purpose.
    Should still have university seats like the Irish retain theirs....but this is a whole different kettle of fish.
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    (Original post by ajp100688)
    Should still have university seats like the Irish retain theirs....but this is a whole different kettle of fish.
    But theirs are for the Senead though so it's not the same thing particularly as Fine Gael want it abolished.
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    (Original post by paddy__power)
    Just contact someone doing the course and ask what they read in the first year....
    I don't know anyone though

    Anyway may not even bother don't want to be a nerd do I

    I may just go to Australia and pick up a few cases of Tooheys Extra Dry as my local shop no longer sells it :cry:
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    I don't know anyone though

    Anyway may not even bother don't want to be a nerd do I

    I may just go to Australia and pick up a few cases of Tooheys Extra Dry as my local shop no longer sells it :cry:
    Nothing nerdy about knowledge brother. :awesome:

    There are loads of people doing such things on TSR.
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    (Original post by paddy__power)
    Nothing nerdy about knowledge brother. :awesome:

    There are loads of people doing such things on TSR.
    But I don't want to come off as too learning centric when I go... yes I want a First but I'll be damned if I have to look like a nerd

    Anyway studying is what Adderall/Cocaine is for
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    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083908/'

    Emily Hone was one attractive girl.
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    (Original post by Nothos)
    Ever snorted baking powder while trying to avoid rape by a gay coke dealer?
    :lolwut:
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    (Original post by Adorno)
    But theirs are for the Senead though so it's not the same thing particularly as Fine Gael want it abolished.
    True, of course ourselves not having an elected upper house kinda rules that out. However I agree with the principle that those better educated should have slightly more say. Somewhat controversial on a strict equality based democratic argument perhaps but democracy is a contestable concept, it doesn't have to be 1 vote, 1 person. Of course I might just be saying this because London had it's own seat and I'd like two votes
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    (Original post by ajp100688)
    True, of course ourselves not having an elected upper house kinda rules that out. However I agree with the principle that those better educated should have slightly more say. Somewhat controversial on a strict equality based democratic argument perhaps but democracy is a contestable concept, it doesn't have to be 1 vote, 1 person. Of course I might just be saying this because London had it's own seat and I'd like two votes
    Well Oxford and the University of Wales had a seat too so that would mean I would have three parliamentary votes. Are you sure you want that?
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    (Original post by Adorno)
    Well Oxford and the University of Wales had a seat too so that would mean I would have three parliamentary votes. Are you sure you want that?
    Scary thought :eek: Tbh most of the unis outside of Cambridge/Oxford would probably elect ridiculous left wingers or Lib Dems (if they ever get over the fees issue) so while being an unconservative thing to do, removing the uni seats is probably beneficial from a Conservative standpoint. It wouldn't surprise me if London University would have elected someone like George Galloway if it still had a seat now, what with all the Muslim students of the London colleges and raging Marxists.
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    haha Ronan lost.
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    (Original post by ajp100688)
    Scary thought :eek: Tbh most of the unis outside of Cambridge/Oxford w
    You say that, Oxford were one of teh very feqw to go pro AV in the Referendum, I wouldn't understimate the student votex in that. Even at Oxford students are heavily lib dem (or at least lib dem policy) still despite the Tuition fees fiasco.
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_449fe9qZc

    Holy crap... the janitor was right.
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    Just discussing physical child discipline with people... wtf is wrong with people? They seem to think that physical punishment means punching a child in the face and beating them... I
 
 
 
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