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    (Original post by Adorno)
    I can't decide between Goodbye Lenin, the Edukators, and Sophie Scholl. Hmm.
    Dear John :yes:
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    So have I... need to upgrade to the Blu-ray's though tbh.
    I watch online.
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    (Original post by Adorno)
    I can't decide between Goodbye Lenin, the Edukators, and Sophie Scholl. Hmm.
    Goodbye Lenin! is dreadful, not seen The Edukators so Sophie Scholl
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    (Original post by paddy__power)
    I watch online.
    Legally... :holmes:
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    Because of Joanna Page? :sexface:
    Eh, pretty much all of it to be honest.
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    (Original post by Thunder and Jazz)
    Eh, pretty much all of it to be honest.
    It is pretty good in general... Hugh Grant dancing as hilarious
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    Goodbye Lenin! is dreadful, not seen The Edukators so Sophie Scholl
    See, I'd very much disagree with you on Goodbye Lenin as it is one of my favourite films. But I've seen it so many times I know almost to the beat what is going to happen in the score and on the screen. I suppose I could watch the Spy who came in from the Cold.
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    Thinking of Love Actually gives me sad memories.
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    (Original post by TheCrackInTime)
    Thinking of Love Actually gives me sad memories.
    :console:

    Why?
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    (Original post by TheCrackInTime)
    Jaws or Deep Blue Sea?
    Neither are that good.
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    :console:

    Why?
    Back when I was in year 7, I was friends with this girl. She was funny, smart and (to my 12 year old self) the most beautiful girl in the world. We used to hang out in the library together after school and one day as we were walking home, I finally managed to find it in me to ask her out to the cinema on a date (Love Actually was out at the time, which is probably why I've associated it with this memory). Before I could ask her though, she told me that her dad had got a new job and that she would be moving away. It was the first time I had felt something for a girl, so to say I was gutted would be an understatement.
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    (Original post by paddy__power)
    Tuna. Pasta. Mayo. Pow.

    If I don't end up at uni next year I will not miss cleaning up after people have parties in the flat.
    Add grated hard boiled egg, makes it so much better.

    Also, I hope you left it to chill before eating, the right wait to eat this dish.
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    (Original post by DayneD89)
    That was just me being pulled out, it was the beating I got following that was the painful part. I was standing along a police line with few people at that section of the kettle when for some reason that section began to attract more people. As I had been at that section while it was quiet I was at the front, so when the police line desided to try and push us back I was being pushed into the police. The protesters were pushing back against the police line and it broke next to me. The police officer in front of me who had spent the time kicking me got a particularly good kick into my shin so I fell down. I fell into the section of the police line that had broken so the police thought I was breaking through the police line so dragged me out and pushed me onto the ground to hit me a few times then let me go.
    Aye, that was a rough protest. To add to the counts of police overreactions; i was at the front of the kettle with Dayne, we'd all linked arms to stop the police charging us. We were pushed from the back, making it impossible to get out, the police shouting "Get back" and numerous protesters just shouting "we can't" or "we're being pushed". The police hold their line, attack anyone that comes near them, i get pushed towards them but try to keep a physical distance (i leaned back). One copper kicked me just below the knee, another hit me with a baton in the other knee, i fell forward (actually, the coppers could have pulled me out at this stage, and if they know anything about crowd control they could predict what was gonna happen). Other people being pushed forward started falling on me and stepping on me, i couldn't breath and eventually gave up shouting (or trying to) "help", but someone picked me up thankfully! I couldn't breathe properly for about 3 weeks.

    (Original post by Ham and Cheese)
    Oh fair enough....you looked pretty angry to be fair the Police acted fairly well in my opinion and its a tough job; act too soft and people say why the hell weren't they tough (like with the invasion of the Tory HQ) but if they are tough then people complain. Did you experience the horse charge?

    Try protesting in another country....go to France and they use water guns. We are fairly good
    Have you ever even been to a protest?
    How about thrown off Trafalgar square? (Okay, i jumped off, but Dayne was thrown)
    This stuff is brutal and unjustifiable, what more than disabled people being attacked by coppers can't you sympathise with?

    If the situation is that police can a) hurt hundreds/thousands of people and save a few thousand pounds of property damage (which is insured anyway) or, b) not hurt hundreds/thousands of people and use tight methods, but more controlled (you can't seriously think me or Dayne deserved what we claim to have received) and targeted 'busts' but occasionally accept that some people will think they're making a point by smashing **** up.

    In addition, comparing us to France is massively flawed; those weren't protests they were riots. I was at the destruction of the Tory HQ and whilst it was a crazy atmosphere it was not nearly on the level of Milibank (that was more some groups doing their own things, with a few randomers joining in, France seemed like everyone was deindividuated) so perhaps it isn't an effective analogy.

    Furthermore, if France has worse violence by protesters, and police whilst using more police violence there is a flaw in your argument, you haven't identified the cause, perhaps more violence by police causes anger by protesters, exacerbating things. (Actually, i reckon this happened to me in a few instances).

    Strong policing is a buzzword for people that find it impossible to quantify what they want out of their law enforcement, i doubt any two definitions of a good police officer are the same, but people do react to reasonable police officers. Dayne and i were having a chat with one at the front of a kettle once, completely different to what we've described (and this was the apparently more violent Trafalgar Square protest, and i can tell you, it was just one big party, very minimal violence that i saw).
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    (Original post by paperclip)
    Have you ever even been to a protest?
    How about thrown off Trafalgar square? (Okay, i jumped off, but Dayne was thrown)
    This stuff is brutal and unjustifiable, what more than disabled people being attacked by coppers can't you sympathise with?

    If the situation is that police can a) hurt hundreds/thousands of people and save a few thousand pounds of property damage (which is insured anyway) or, b) not hurt hundreds/thousands of people and use tight methods, but more controlled (you can't seriously think me or Dayne deserved what we claim to have received) and targeted 'busts' but occasionally accept that some people will think they're making a point by smashing **** up.

    In addition, comparing us to France is massively flawed; those weren't protests they were riots. I was at the destruction of the Tory HQ and whilst it was a crazy atmosphere it was not nearly on the level of Milibank (that was more some groups doing their own things, with a few randomers joining in, France seemed like everyone was deindividuated) so perhaps it isn't an effective analogy.

    Furthermore, if France has worse violence by protesters, and police whilst using more police violence there is a flaw in your argument, you haven't identified the cause, perhaps more violence by police causes anger by protesters, exacerbating things. (Actually, i reckon this happened to me in a few instances).

    Strong policing is a buzzword for people that find it impossible to quantify what they want out of their law enforcement, i doubt any two definitions of a good police officer are the same, but people do react to reasonable police officers. Dayne and i were having a chat with one at the front of a kettle once, completely different to what we've described (and this was the apparently more violent Trafalgar Square protest, and i can tell you, it was just one big party, very minimal violence that i saw).
    The student protest was no 'protest'; that was a riot! Was the destruction of Tory HQ a 'protest'? It is unfortunate that it was a small minority of people that turned the protest into a riot but that was no protest. I am not sure what you or Dayne did; you may have protested peacefully or got involved in the violence.

    You cannot excuse violence on the premise that its insured anyway. I watched a programme on BBC3 recently called 'Police Academy', which has already confirmed my beliefs before; we have one of the most tolerant and liberal police forces than many other countries.

    I believe the Police acted well; what did you expect them to do? Allow the protest to go out of control? Allow more people to deface buildings and promote violence? As I have said, the Police have a very tough job; act too softly and people will criticise and if they act too harsh then people will criticise. The Police get a hell a lot of stick of any type of policing that they adopt. I accept that the student protests were meant to be peaceful but they weren't; a small minority scattered around the whole crowd promoted violence and raised tempers. The Police had to control the whole crowd because it would have been impossible when tempers have got so high (caused by the anarchists) to pick them out.

    Have a look at the footage; watch the anarchists deface property and police vans and watch the crowd cheer and support their actions. I watched the coverage throughout the day and you only saw a few people against the violence; a girl called Zoe who tried to stop people from defacing the police van. I commend her for what she did; it showed bravery, stuck to her principles and distanced herself from the violence.

    In all honesty, did you and Dayne take the approach that Zoe took or did you get swept up in the 'atmosphere' and ended up supporting the violence?
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    (Original post by Ham and Cheese)
    The student protest was no 'protest'; that was a riot! Was the destruction of Tory HQ a 'protest'? It is unfortunate that it was a small minority of people that turned the protest into a riot but that was no protest. I am not sure what you or Dayne did; you may have protested peacefully or got involved in the violence.
    Of course it was a protest; the riot was minority fraction of the protest by anarchists. But of course for those of you who weren't there, minoritarianism definitely sways what you thought, right?

    And because an infraction of say 50 people go into Millbank Tower and create damage on the Conservative Party HQ, does this mean that the protest automatically becomes a riot? And if the other hundreds of thousands of individuals do not participate in the misgivings of the anarchists are we still rioting? Not at all. Up to 500,000 protestors attended the anti-cuts demonstration which was definitely a march. It was set up by Unison etc and the talks in Hyde Park were on genuine protests. The March in London was a genuine protest. Tens of thousands entered for the March Against the Alternative protest - This was a march. I guarantee that to label this march a protest is a farce by the highest degree.
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    (Original post by Ham and Cheese)
    Try protesting in another country....go to France and they use water guns. We are fairly good
    Indeed the police also use tear gas and will gladly beat the **** out of anyone if they overstep the mark which always happens after the first day as the first day is normally peaceful then as it goes on it gets more and more violent... even more violent than what you saw in the student "riots" as they were nothing :pierre: admittedly it is normally a small percentage who get violent but more so than in Britain... and I don't mean of the beating a policeman up but fire-bombs and the like

    So the reason is the force is higher in France is because the violence is higher, I invite you to go on a strike and see for yourself
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    (Original post by Ham and Cheese)
    You cannot excuse violence on the premise that its insured anyway. I watched a programme on BBC3 recently called 'Police Academy', which has already confirmed my beliefs before; we have one of the most tolerant and liberal police forces than many other countries.
    We once did, when the police used intellectual reason and personal contact that was built up over many years of community service to ensure that the police were truly the thin blue line between authoritarian order and chaos. My gran tells me stories of when my granddad policed the strikes in the 1970s when the police and the strikers shared sandwiches, flasks of tea, and generally only made a fuss when the television cameras wanted some dramatic pictures. That's a liberal, tolerant police force. No riot gear, no tear gas, no nightsticks, no army tactics, no armed response units. Just ordinary working-class men policing a protest by ordinary working-class men.

    Now we have thrown that in the bin because the average intelligence of the police force has gone down, the rise in former soldiers being press ganged into service has shot up, and we have a shocking rise in the use of army tactics of deployment and enforcement. The British Police has ceased to be a civilian operation. It has become an extension of the authority of the state to impose on its citizens rather than a representative of the people to defend their interests. The current nature of the police in the UK is fairly disgusting and y'know there is a very definite stunde null (zero hour) for this whole nonsense:

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    (Original post by Ham and Cheese)
    The student protest was no 'protest'; that was a riot!
    Because it was reported as a riot, because that's what makes headlines that sell, or redirects attention from the real story (what is being protested against), depending on your interpretation of the way our media works.
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    (Original post by Adorno)
    We once did, when the police used intellectual reason and personal contact that was built up over many years of community service to ensure that the police were truly the thin blue line between authoritarian order and chaos. My gran tells me stories of when my granddad policed the strikes in the 1970s when the police and the strikers shared sandwiches, flasks of tea, and generally only made a fuss when the television cameras wanted some dramatic pictures. That's a liberal, tolerant police force. No riot gear, no tear gas, no nightsticks, no army tactics, no armed response units. Just ordinary working-class men policing a protest by ordinary working-class men.

    Now we have thrown that in the bin because the average intelligence of the police force has gone down, the rise in former soldiers being press ganged into service has shot up, and we have a shocking rise in the use of army tactics of deployment and enforcement. The British Police has ceased to be a civilian operation. It has become an extension of the authority of the state to impose on its citizens rather than a representative of the people to defend their interests. The current nature of the police in the UK is fairly disgusting and y'know there is a very definite stunde null (zero hour) for this whole nonsense:

    What did you expect from the student protests? What did you expect when they smashed police vans and destroyed buildings and trashed the Tory HQ? What would you want the Police to do about that? Standby and let them all do it? No, they have to stop it; the protesters don't respond to the liberal 'could you please not do that' approach and the Police therefore are more tough. Then again, we are more liberal in terms of our Police than most other countries.

    Look at my images; look at the aggressive body language of the man there and look at the aggression shown by the crowd as a group. What do you expect the Police to do about that as barriers come hurdling towards them?



 
 
 
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