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    I'm thinking about giving a presentation critiquing the beauty industry. I feel very passionately about the topic, but I am concerned that the argument has been heard ad nauseum. What are your thoughts:

    Specifically, I want to discuss how beauty has moved from economy ("bigger" women were beautiful in Greece because they looked healthier, for example) to exclusivity (very few women can match the images portrayed in magazines). Another example of this shift is seen in clothing, which went from a tool for survival to an expression of fashion/beauty, regardless of economy (such as a girl who wears a skirt in winter ). Next, I would argue that beauty in today's society is "unnatural" (i.e. a woman making herself taller w/ high heels despite the damage it does to her feet). Finally, I will encourage parents to teach their daughters that the beauty industry isn't actually beautiful.

    Is this original? :confused:
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    I want to share a video that I saw about 3 years ago. Regardless of what you think on the topic, I believe the video is powerful:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/tpiper#p/u/1/Ei6JvK0W60I
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    the fashion industry is run by gay men who are not attracted to boobs. Hence why all the women are stick thin and look like boys.

    Sue me.
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    (Original post by magnum.opus)
    I'm thinking about giving a presentation critiquing the beauty industry. I feel very passionately about the topic, but I am concerned that the argument has been heard ad nauseum. What are your thoughts:

    Specifically, I want to discuss how beauty has moved from economy ("bigger" women were beautiful in Greece because they looked healthier, for example) to exclusivity (very few women can match the images portrayed in magazines). Another example of this shift is seen in clothing, which went from a tool for survival to an expression of fashion/beauty, regardless of economy (such as a girl who wears a skirt in winter ). Next, I would argue that beauty in today's society is "unnatural" (i.e. a woman making herself taller w/ high heels despite the damage it does to her feet). Finally, I will encourage parents to teach their daughters that the beauty industry isn't actually beautiful.

    Is this original? :confused:
    Airbrushing ---> images of aspiration that don't even exist in reality

    Heels are bad for your back
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    (Original post by No Future)
    Airbrushing ---> images of aspiration that don't even exist in reality

    Heels are bad for your back
    Yes, all good points. But that doesn't answer my question: is this topic original? Or will the audience be like "been there, heard that"?
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    (Original post by magnum.opus)
    I'm thinking about giving a presentation critiquing the beauty industry. I feel very passionately about the topic, but I am concerned that the argument has been heard ad nauseum. What are your thoughts:

    Specifically, I want to discuss how beauty has moved from economy ("bigger" women were beautiful in Greece because they looked healthier, for example) to exclusivity (very few women can match the images portrayed in magazines). Another example of this shift is seen in clothing, which went from a tool for survival to an expression of fashion/beauty, regardless of economy (such as a girl who wears a skirt in winter ). Next, I would argue that beauty in today's society is "unnatural" (i.e. a woman making herself taller w/ high heels despite the damage it does to her feet). Finally, I will encourage parents to teach their daughters that the beauty industry isn't actually beautiful.

    Is this original? :confused:
    Well, if you look at some of the old film stars from the 20th century you'll see that they had entirely different body shapes to the girls you see today, curvy, hourglass voluptuous women. Very feminine. More like Kim Kardashian. Maybe size 10-12-14? Rather than the waif like figures nowadays (size 4-6-8?) You can blame Kate Moss for that. Of course it's not just dress size, body shape is a huge factor. But I think that both these figures mentioned are just as hard to obtain. Women in England tend to be pear shaped, how many pear-shaped celebrities do you see? The fashion industry chooses figures that clothes will look good on. It's true that celebrities and models may not represent the real public but if that were the case there would be no exclusivity.

    Actually flat shoes are just as bad for your feet as high shoes. You need something in the middle.

    Well, despite the negatives, the fashion industry is one of the biggest and most successful industries in the world. It's amazing. There are some very clever people behind it appealing to our vanity. You could discuss their methods in making us buy new clothes when we don't actually require new clothes until they are worn out.

    I don't think you should condemn the fashion industry, people desire to be beautiful to find a mate (humans are constantly searching for love), to look at beautiful people (that's just aesthetics), people want to self improve and feel better about themselves and that can be done with a bit of make up and some nice clothes.

    I don't agree with photo shopping and I think that enhanced photos should have a few words saying that it is shopped. I read an interview with a teen star who said that now she's in the industry she sees how fake it is, but that doesn't make the stars any less beautiful, just more natural. But I think you need to realise that if we had a regular, plain, nothing special woman in a beauty campaign (to represent the average public?) the product wouldn't sell very well. Even the "real women" in Dove's Campaigns are very pretty women and they may be a bit larger but they still have nice shapes. People want aesthetically pleasing models. And we like to believe that this new wonder product is gonna give us the images in the photos: massive hair (extensions actually), long eyelashes (falsies), poreless skin (photoshopped), white teeth (models can afford the best dentists).

    Maybe for something new you could talk about the White Beauty Myth that was on Channel 4 recently. It's pretty controversial so you'd have to word it well.

    Hope that helped, you need both sides of the story for a good speech.
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    Purely looking at this from the view of having a good presentation topic - this feels like it's been "done" before. How about focusing on misleading advertising and product claims in the beauty industry? That's a whole minefield in itself... Especially with the rise in consumer interest in so-called "natural" products.
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    (Original post by RahRah09)
    Well, if you look at some of the old film stars from the 20th century you'll see that they had entirely different body shapes to the girls you see today, curvy, hourglass voluptuous women. Very feminine. More like Kim Kardashian. Maybe size 10-12-14? Rather than the waif like figures nowadays (size 4-6-8?) You can blame Kate Moss for that. Of course it's not just dress size, body shape is a huge factor. But I think that both these figures mentioned are just as hard to obtain. Women in England tend to be pear shaped, how many pear-shaped celebrities do you see? The fashion industry chooses figures that clothes will look good on. It's true that celebrities and models may not represent the real public but if that were the case there would be no exclusivity.

    Actually flat shoes are just as bad for your feet as high shoes. You need something in the middle.

    Well, despite the negatives, the fashion industry is one of the biggest and most successful industries in the world. It's amazing. There are some very clever people behind it appealing to our vanity. You could discuss their methods in making us buy new clothes when we don't actually require new clothes until they are worn out.

    I don't think you should condemn the fashion industry, people desire to be beautiful to find a mate (humans are constantly searching for love), to look at beautiful people (that's just aesthetics), people want to self improve and feel better about themselves and that can be done with a bit of make up and some nice clothes.

    I don't agree with photo shopping and I think that enhanced photos should have a few words saying that it is shopped. I read an interview with a teen star who said that now she's in the industry she sees how fake it is, but that doesn't make the stars any less beautiful, just more natural. But I think you need to realise that if we had a regular, plain, nothing special woman in a beauty campaign (to represent the average public?) the product wouldn't sell very well. Even the "real women" in Dove's Campaigns are very pretty women and they may be a bit larger but they still have nice shapes. People want aesthetically pleasing models. And we like to believe that this new wonder product is gonna give us the images in the photos: massive hair (extensions actually), long eyelashes (falsies), poreless skin (photoshopped), white teeth (models can afford the best dentists).

    Maybe for something new you could talk about the White Beauty Myth that was on Channel 4 recently. It's pretty controversial so you'd have to word it well.

    Hope that helped, you need both sides of the story for a good speech.
    Interesting points. Thanks for providing the other side of the coin.
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    (Original post by star_violet)
    Purely looking at this from the view of having a good presentation topic - this feels like it's been "done" before. How about focusing on misleading advertising and product claims in the beauty industry? That's a whole minefield in itself... Especially with the rise in consumer interest in so-called "natural" products.
    Yeah, now that I have thought about it more, I am inclined to agree with you: it's not an original topic. A presentation on the communication tactics used by the beauty industry is a great approach, though, so I'll have to take your advise and look into that. Thanks!
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    I find in the current world of fashion, I'm like a walrus to the sticks. Although I wouldn't say I was that big(36C-27-36) but these girls are like (32A-24-32) I think about health risks of being that size.

    I love my slight curves and would love to see curvy woman as the average bra size of the uk have went up from a 34b to a 36c so it is misrepresenting natural women of the uk , as we are getting more curvy
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    (Original post by magnum.opus)
    Yeah, now that I have thought about it more, I am inclined to agree with you: it's not an original topic. A presentation on the communication tactics used by the beauty industry is a great approach, though, so I'll have to take your advise and look into that. Thanks!
    No worries. You might find this blog interesting if you need more food for thought!
    http://beautyandthebull****.blogspot.com/


    Edit: Apparently TSR is filtering the expletive in the weblink. The stars are actually a word that starts with "s" and ends with "hit"..!
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    Good point to make in terms of communication is that fashion now changes very quickly. It's no longer mass psychology which leads to a change in fashion, but the sudden decision of a handful of powerful designers, who's opinions then filter down. Even those who try to be unique and not follow mainstream fashion still ultimately end up wearing similar things, because that idea is a fashion in itself. The result is fashion changes every six months or so, and doesn't really allow for consumer choice.

    Big designer likes the idea of everyone wearing orange heels --> Puts them in catwalk show ---> Magazines say it is the new fashion ---> Women want orange shoes

    Six months later

    Big designer likes blue shoes ---> puts them in show ---> Magazine runs a feature saying "orange is out, and blue is in!" ---> Women suddenly find orange shoes garish and ugly and want blue shoes.

    There's very little choice. We more or less have to run with what the fashion designer likes, or we're told it's "so last season."


    That's all massively simplified of course, but you get the idea.
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    (Original post by Direct15)
    I find in the current world of fashion, I'm like a walrus to the sticks. Although I wouldn't say I was that big(36C-27-36) but these girls are like (32A-24-32) I think about health risks of being that size.

    I love my slight curves and would love to see curvy woman as the average bra size of the uk have went up from a 34b to a 36c so it is misrepresenting natural women of the uk , as we are getting more curvy
    Someone else mentioned the curviness of women in the UK. That's an interesting um, can I use the word "phenomena" without sounding offensive?

    I feel like Americans are getting shorter and shorter
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    (Original post by star_violet)
    No worries. You might find this blog interesting if you need more food for thought!
    http://beautyandthebull****.blogspot.com/


    Edit: Apparently TSR is filtering the expletive in the weblink. The stars are actually a word that starts with "s" and ends with "hit"..!
    Haha, I had to "correct" the expletive before it would load XD

    And this site looks very good! "Though proud biatch that I am, as I need to sustain an annoying habit called eating, I do accept ads from other industries." :lol: Thanks!
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    (Original post by BlueJoker)
    Good point to make in terms of communication is that fashion now changes very quickly. It's no longer mass psychology which leads to a change in fashion, but the sudden decision of a handful of powerful designers, who's opinions then filter down. Even those who try to be unique and not follow mainstream fashion still ultimately end up wearing similar things, because that idea is a fashion in itself. The result is fashion changes every six months or so, and doesn't really allow for consumer choice.

    Big designer likes the idea of everyone wearing orange heels --> Puts them in catwalk show ---> Magazines say it is the new fashion ---> Women want orange shoes

    Six months later

    Big designer likes blue shoes ---> puts them in show ---> Magazine runs a feature saying "orange is out, and blue is in!" ---> Women suddenly find orange shoes garish and ugly and want blue shoes.

    There's very little choice. We more or less have to run with what the fashion designer likes, or we're told it's "so last season."


    That's all massively simplified of course, but you get the idea.
    Hmm, I really like that point- fashion has gone from a group decision to an individual one (made at the hands of the designers). That could also tie in with communication theory related to obedience: many people not only hear what the fashion designers say ("this shoe is in, the other is out"), but they actually obey them.
 
 
 
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