Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

A Levels or IB? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Right, so I have to decide whether to choose IB or A Levels by the end of next week, as the college I want to go to lets you change your mind...

    Which would you say is better? As apparently if you do IB you have NO social life. And don't Uni's only look for 3 A Levels anyway?

    :confused:
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Social life is not an issue with either, and unis accept both. With IB you have a greater variety of choice with six subjects, so if you're not set on your subjects and would like to take a range than this would be the way to go. Also important to consider the amount of material available for the IB vs A levels, as generally I've seen A level has more material pertaining to its syllabuses. I think that IB only has exams at the end of the 2nd year, so if you would prefer being able to resit than A level would be beneficial here, though can't remember exactly if there's no exams in the first year of IB. Really I don't think there's much of a difference, however I personally went for A levels as I understood the system better and was able to take 5 subjects anyway, though I know many people taking IB and they have no complaints. Toss a coin..
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    A-levels. My college ran the IB for one year (a friend of mine did it) before it got cancelled because only like 6 people did it and they were cut off from the rest of the students because of timetabling differences, they never shared classes with the A-level students.

    The IB also only has exams at the end of the 2nd year so if you screw them up there's not a lot you can do about it, whereas with A-levels you can do resits. It's up to you whether you want to take the risk, but you might be best off doing A-levels - you have more spare time and will probably make more friends.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    There's no point going through IB, do A-Levels.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    IB will basically make you hate everything.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    A levels.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Take A levels so you can do what subjects you want.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Only pick IB if you want to do a broad range of subjects. That's really the only advantage. I don't know what it's like now but when I was applying for uni the offers for IB were a lot higher than those for A level which was really frustrating. I don't care what anyone says, Oxbridge asking for a minimum of 38 was not the same as getting AAA.
    Also if your school is new to the IB then I'd stay away from it. Teachers find it very difficult to adapt to the IB syllabus and criteria which often leads to a high failing rate.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Travelling_Girl)
    Only pick IB if you want to do a broad range of subjects. That's really the only advantage. I don't know what it's like now but when I was applying for uni the offers for IB were a lot higher than those for A level which was really frustrating. I don't care what anyone says, Oxbridge asking for a minimum of 48 was not the same as getting AAA.
    Also if your school is new to the IB then I'd stay away from it. Teachers find it very difficult to adapt to the IB syllabus and criteria which often leads to a high failing rate.
    the part in bold. i was part of the first group to do it at my school and for some parts it was a DISASTER!

    IB = hell. don't do it!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I almost did the IB, but I don't regret choosing A-Levels. If your interests cover a broad range of subjects then IB might be the way to go, if not then it's probably best to take 4/5 AS levels.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Travelling_Girl)
    Only pick IB if you want to do a broad range of subjects. That's really the only advantage. I don't know what it's like now but when I was applying for uni the offers for IB were a lot higher than those for A level which was really frustrating. I don't care what anyone says, Oxbridge asking for a minimum of 38 was not the same as getting AAA.
    Also if your school is new to the IB then I'd stay away from it. Teachers find it very difficult to adapt to the IB syllabus and criteria which often leads to a high failing rate.
    The college that I'm hoping to apply for has done the IB for 7 years I think, so they're not new to it... and around 30 people do it each year apparently.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KAT =))
    The college that I'm hoping to apply for has done the IB for 7 years I think, so they're not new to it... and around 30 people do it each year apparently.
    Mine had been doing it for 5 years and more than half of us either failed or dropped out. Only 4 of us got above the "average" of 30points. I'd have a look at the past grades if I were you to check that your school is up to teaching and supporting you through the ib.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    'The IB Diploma is highly regarded by universities. They welcome students who have continued a breadth and depth of study across a range of subjects. The top IB scores are worth the equivalent of six and a half A grades at A level and even a low pass at IB is worth the equivalent of three A grades at A level. The IB Diploma also provides a broad general education which will stand students in good stead in any career.'

    That's what I thought was good?!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If you're really stumped as to what you want to do in the future, then IB is probably best so you're not limited (and you can become a all-rounded individual ). But if you know roughly what you want to do at uni then save yourself some work and do A levels.

    One of the biggest problems that you'll find with IB is that if theres a subject you're not particularly strong at it can seriously pull down your final grade. Also, TOK. My exams start next week and I still don't understand why I was forced to endure that subject.

    (Original post by SpicyStrawberry)
    The IB also only has exams at the end of the 2nd year so if you screw them up there's not a lot you can do about it, whereas with A-levels you can do resits. It's up to you whether you want to take the risk, but you might be best off doing A-levels - you have more spare time and will probably make more friends.
    Thats not true. You can resit any IB exams that you've failed in the next sitting, so if you fail a May exam you can resit in November. Then, provided you pass the second time, the score is just added to your total.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I prefer the IB because it lets you take a range of different classes, which was good for me since I have an interest in both science and social studies. But really, I think the IB is a lot more thought provoking, and makes you a better thinker at the end of it.
    Just having TOK class is worth it, provided you have a good teacher. It's been one of my favourite learning experiences thus far.
    I will admit though, it's intense! But going in-depth in a range of different subjects, I feel, has made me a more rounded individual. But I guess it's up to personal choice, whether you want to focus your studies on a particular subject area like science, or study a broader array of subjects.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KAT =))
    'The IB Diploma is highly regarded by universities. They welcome students who have continued a breadth and depth of study across a range of subjects. The top IB scores are worth the equivalent of six and a half A grades at A level and even a low pass at IB is worth the equivalent of three A grades at A level. The IB Diploma also provides a broad general education which will stand students in good stead in any career.'

    That's what I thought was good?!
    That may be so, but most universities especially the Oxbridge/Russel Group/1994 Group don't agree.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Escocia)
    Thats not true. You can resit any IB exams that you've failed in the next sitting, so if you fail a May exam you can resit in November. Then, provided you pass the second time, the score is just added to your total.
    Wouldn't you have already left college if you took the exam in May of your second year though and had to resit in November :confused:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SpicyStrawberry)
    Wouldn't you have already left college if you took the exam in May of your second year though and had to resit in November :confused:
    Yeah, you would. But you can just register with your IB coordinator to resit the exams you failed at the next sitting, and you basically have all the time between the May exams and the November exams to focus on only the subjects you're resitting and only go in to college on the days you have exams.
    You don't even have to do the resits at your own college, if you're moving you can register with a different college and still do the resits.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by moneyballs2)
    IB will basically make you hate everything.

    (Original post by green chica)
    the part in bold. i was part of the first group to do it at my school and for some parts it was a DISASTER!

    IB = hell. don't do it!

    (Original post by Travelling_Girl)
    Mine had been doing it for 5 years and more than half of us either failed or dropped out. Only 4 of us got above the "average" of 30points. I'd have a look at the past grades if I were you to check that your school is up to teaching and supporting you through the ib.
    WOW. Okay, I didn't realise that everyone thought it was this bad?! Considering that I don't really want to go to any of the Russell Group Universities (felt like I had to put it in capitals there ) what other universities would accept it? Thanks for you help in advance!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KAT =))
    WOW. Okay, I didn't realise that everyone thought it was this bad?! Considering that I don't really want to go to any of the Russell Group Universities (felt like I had to put it in capitals there ) what other universities would accept it? Thanks for you help in advance!
    It isn't bad. I personally loved it. But for me it made applying to universities harder because what they wanted from IB was so much harder to achieve than for the A level students. It's just important to know what you are getting yourself into before you start it. We were all dazzled by the "universities love it more than A levels" "a 24 at IB is already AAA" "doing IB makes you stand out from the crowd" "it is great if you want to study medicince" and so on. We soon found out how (in the UK at least) it was all utter bull. We started out as a group of 24, which ended up at a pitiful 13 by the end of the 2nd year. I was definitely in the minority of people left who did not regret doing the IB.

    If you want to do a broad range of subjects then please go for it. But I also beg you to do your research before committing to it. Find out how well former students have done, find out which subjects can and can't be studied at HL and SL (we had a big problem with people not wanting to study HL Maths but our school didn't do SL, and someone who wanted to do HL Physics but the school only did SL). And also have a look on UCAS at the IB requirements for universities that you may possibly be interested in applying to.

    Oh and do let us know on your final decision
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.