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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Oh dear, you have been getting your information from tabliods. We are not given a quota of time we can have off sick, its complete *******s. So what if someone went back for two weeks and then went off sick again. Have you ever suffered from mental illness? Are you a psychologst? Just because someone doesn't have a visible illness does not mean they are not sick. Your aunt might be able to explain that one to you.
    I highly doubt that the majority of the workforce all suffer from horrible illnesses every few weeks!
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    (Original post by Moleman1996)
    I highly doubt that the majority of the workforce all suffer from horrible illnesses every few weeks!
    So youre basing the behaviour of the entire workforce of the NHS on a story your aunt told you? Do you know anything about depression? Its possible that this person felt well enough to work but then once in work found they couldnt cope.
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    (Original post by Moleman1996)
    ye full of suprises, like when you realise how bad the NHS is, when you look at how much you're paying! "Most we've ever paid, worst the service has ever been"
    My parents both had a positive experience with NHS.If it weren't for NHS, neither of them would have had full use of left hand. Oh, and they pay taxes too.
    Most people have mixed experience with it, but you can't deny that it was and is vital to many people.
    And how would privatising sectors of NHS improve it? Apart from making it inaccessible to those that are not well off.
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    (Original post by Moleman1996)
    pretty strict? They add it to their holidays! And no im not, I have an IQ of above 20 so i don't read tabloids. My aunty is nurse, and has been for over 20 years. She knows someone who came back after "depression" for three days, stayed two weeks, and was off again.
    Depression varies, she probably felt under pressure to return to work, but when she did found she couldn't cope. Your aunty obviously doesn't know much about mental illness.
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    (Original post by Militantbuthopeful)
    Just out of interest would you describe yourself as a neoliberal?
    Nope. I'd just describe myself as a liberal. I suppose other people might describe me as neoliberal, but ultimately I don't think these sorts of subideological distinctions are particularly useful.
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    (Original post by GwrxVurfer)
    Um....no you're not. That is incorrect.

    Everyone who has contributed to the system (health insurance) reaps the benefit of free healthcare in America. So in that respect, it's a bit like the British healthcare system. Really, the big difference is the method of contribution.

    From what I've heard, the cost of health insurance can be big, but is manageable for most. And even the ones who truly can't afford it, they get help from Medicaid/Medicare I think. Also, if you come into an emergency room in America with life-threatening illnesses, they will treat you, regardless of whether you have contributed to the system. They don't "sit there and let you die".
    which leads to their er rooms being the gps surgey - completely overcrowded and really expensive to run with people turning up with primary care ailments - and the desperate turning up for treatment. most new hospitals don't build er rooms becuase they are such a drain on resources. also they provide acute treatment yes, once the time to be passed on to wards arrives it becomes a lot less clear cut.

    medicare and medicaid are a joke, they are stupidly expensive and are bankrupting the country on the scale where the nash looks like penny sweets.

    the contribution in america is two-fold - taxation to fund gov. health schemes (that cost more than the nash does) and through rip-off insurance where you can still have it dropped if you lose jobs, develop certain conditions etc

    primary care in the usa is also non-existant.

    healthcare isn't remotely manageable to the forty million without the bloody thing! i can't believe anybody would be stupid enough as to defend the worlds most expensive (by far far far far) and underpeforming healthcare system - it's a gigantic bloated mess - australia, france maybe (although not as great as they appear on paper) but america!!

    (Original post by IGetGully)
    This is true

    Not compared to the USA, but compared to places like Poland where they don't spend nearly as much as we do on healthcare, but at the first sign of anything that could be cancer related, they pass you straight off to a specialist
    I suppose we employ oncologsts so they can read the paper and make cakes then?
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    (Original post by TulipFields)
    My parents both had a positive experience with NHS.If it weren't for NHS, neither of them would have had full use of left hand. Oh, and they pay taxes too.
    Most people have mixed experience with it, but you can't deny that it was and is vital to many people.
    And how would privatising sectors of NHS improve it? Apart from making it inaccessible to those that are not well off.
    i don't think it should be privatised, it just needs massively improving
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    So youre basing the behaviour of the entire workforce of the NHS on a story your aunt told you? Do you know anything about depression? Its possible that this person felt well enough to work but then once in work found they couldnt cope.
    nope, i'm basing it on recently published figures, several different people, who have no connections expiriences
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    The NHS could be improved yes but it's an amazing thing, I would certainly be dead without it, and so would many other people, those of you who don't like it go private, I don't think it is fair for people to pay out if something goes wrong with their health, paying proggressively through taxes is an idea most countries should adopt in my opinion. There are people in America who die because they can't afford the healthcare needed, which is really wrong.
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    [QUOTE=xXMessedUpXx;30922928]Depression varies, she probably felt under pressure to return to work, but when she did found she couldn't cope. Your aunty obviously doesn't know much about mental illness.[/QUOTE/]

    wasn't off for depression second time, conveniantly caught a cold which stayed around for 6 or 7 weeks :/
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    (Original post by GwrxVurfer)
    Surely the emergency room is the most appropriate place to go to when you have an immediate life-threatening illness.
    obviously :rolleyes: but american er rooms are full of patients who should be seeing family doctors/dermatologists/pharmacists and would in any other system - but they can't afford it - so they just turn up at er and make them packed because of the law whereby they have to be treated.

    It isn't the worlds most expensive and under performing healthcare system, that's just your opinion. You'd do well not to confuse opinion with actual fact.
    It is the world's most expensive - you are the one confusing facts (it's hardly a difficult fact to find is it??

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...%29_per_capita

    see this study from the commonwealth fund (pretty impartial and unbiased)



    Britain's health service makes it the only one of 11 leading industrialised nations where wealth does not determine access to care. In all the countries surveyed except Britain, wealth was a significant factor in access to health, with patients earning less than the national average more likely to report trouble with medical bills and problems getting care because of cost. The NHS was also extremely cost-effective, with spending on health per person almost the lowest in the survey. A person in the UK paid $1,500 less than one in Switzerland and less than half the $7,538 paid by every American for healthcare. Only New Zealand, where one in seven said they skipped hospital visits because of cost, spent less per head.
    spending on healthcare in the UK is some of the lowest in the world for an industrialised country! the USA spends loads of money and has crap, crap, crap outcomes - it has a low life expectancy, high infant mortality, high levels of mrsa amongst others - so despite spending by far the most - it gets very average health outcomes and 40 million are uninsured. It's crap!



    american healthcare is a monster - and medicare and medicaid are bankrupting the federal government - the whole system is a complete and utter mess and costs are spiralling out of control - the percent gdp spend per year keeps rising and rising - total **** system!
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    I fiercely defend the NHS. Even if it's not the best healthcare system in the world, I'd much rather have it than have to pay upfront for medical care.
    We also have private healthcare (dad's choice, not mine), and there's horrendous paperwork after every hospital visit, and BUPA always seem to screw up the bill. They're still trying to charge us £300 for xrays that I didn't even have? :/
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    How long do people usually have to wait in the Emergency room under this NHS system? Just curious.
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    (Original post by MacSci)
    How long do people usually have to wait in the Emergency room under this NHS system? Just curious.
    four hour breach time, if your having cardiac arrest significantly less!
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    (Original post by Lassilsa)
    The NHS is the worst healthcare system in the western world. Our cancer survival rates are abysmal compared to the US.
    Yeah, and in theory those will get worse when people can't afford treatment. Getting rid of the NHS in a terrible financial climate is basically just asking for an increased mortality rate.

    People won't want to go to the doctors early on because they don't want to pay, British society is too stingy to go for treatment until it becomes a genuine emergency and in most cases too late if there was a pricetag on treatment.
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    (Original post by Organ)
    four hour breach time, if your having cardiac arrest significantly less!
    Four hour's not too bad...wow. I'm sure it also doesn't take very long to see specialist physician or get surgery. Is it usually within four weeks, or longer?
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    (Original post by MacSci)
    Four hour's not too bad...wow. I'm sure it also doesn't take very long to see specialist physician or get surgery. Is it usually within four weeks, or longer?
    depends, cancer cannot exceed two weeks by law - other urgent treatment falls into a similarish bracket. the max. is 18 weeks. people who want to skip wait times will have private insurance or pay out of pocket.
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    (Original post by Lassilsa)
    The NHS is the worst healthcare system in the western world. Our cancer survival rates are abysmal compared to the US.
    That would be because the American system only treats those with insurance good enough to cover the care. Anyone with crappy insurance or insurance that doesn't cover their type of cancer or the extent of it is left to die. The NHS treats everyone equally, whether you're a millionaire or a homeless person. So even the people with no hope are treated and kept as healthy as possible for as long as possible. Which means proportionately, the UK's NHS saves more people from Cancer than America by far.
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    Thank Britain for the NHS! On my work experience a while ago I was in the accounting offices at a big hospital and I got to see how much an average doctor spent in 6 months treating patients. The figure was in the millions. An MRI alone costs around £3000. I doubt many people would be able to just fork up that amount of cash. The NHS has many flaws, but it works and it cares for people regardless of who they are or how much money they have. Urgency of care is based on the seriousness of the illness, not the content of a wallet. It's one of Britain's many wonderful attributes and brilliant successes.
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    (Original post by Organ)
    four hour breach time, if your having cardiac arrest significantly less!
    Ye, they're opening a load of them walk in doctor's centres in Hull now, to reduce the amount of people at A&E with minor injuries, e.g. sprained ankle
 
 
 
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