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    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
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    Luckily I got a place before the increase.

    I'm not sure - people may actually see the graduate employment prospects for medicine - and say 'hey I want to spend my 9K a year training for a job' and hence may be more inclined towards applying for vocational subjects like medicine, dentistry and the like, at the moment only four years of the degree are paid by the student (5 onwards by the nhs) so it isn't that much longer than a standard three year course.

    On the other hand - the increased length of the course may deter people (I don't think it will deter significant numbers though).

    I think the fees issue affects the entire university system, and not just medicine. People will be deterred full stop. I imagine less people will apply to the London schools - the additional London debt on top of the fees increase will be a large weight around a graduates neck.

    I think at the end of the day- £9,000 isn't a bad price for a degree that costs the taxpayer £250,000 - £300,000 - so I don't think it's the worst investment (although I do disagree with the fee rise). I would be more concerned about history and philosphy depts. where the prospects post-graduation are less clear and the course is a lot more self-directed (ie a lot more of what am I actually paying for?).
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    I know some people, myself included, who had previously thought of apply to London medical schools but now have doubts due to the increased cost and the increased debt that will go with it. I am worried about paying it off but only if I fail at medical school, if I graduate and become a Doctor then I am not really that worried about paying it off and I am someone who comes from quite a poor, working class background so won't be given a large amount of financial support from parents. I don't know anyone who has given up due to the rise either though. Hope this helps
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    Yeah ^^ London prices put me off this year (although I did consider it) - there isn't a flying monkeys chance I would want to spend 5/6 years of london prices and 9K tuition fees for no real reason.
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    (Original post by maxpemberton)
    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
    Well to be honest the situation for graduate entry students is far harder than school leavers. Grad entry students can't claim tuition fee loans and in all likelihood are about to have their NHS bursaries pulled too. Basically it's looking like I have to pay £27,000 upfront for my medicine degree. I have more details re: what the government and BMA are doing, if you want info on that either PM me here or you know where to reach me on twitter

    I miss St. P!
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    Doesn't make a difference in my opinion or the opinion of everyone I know who had decided they wanted to study medicine before the fee changes were announced. Year 12 now.
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    Securing a foundation post upon graduating seems to be becoming more of an uncertainty. It doesn't appear to be a major problem at the moment, but I've been led to believe that it is a growing one. However, I doubt many applicants would know about this.

    News of front-line NHS job cuts, however, is reaching mainstream news. The hike in fees alone would not deter me from applying for medicine, but if you combine this with the apparent decline in job security, then perhaps it would affect other people's decision. Although I haven't answered your question directly (and I'm not the most appropriate person to do so as I'm not faced with such a decision), I'm just pointing out that some future applicants may take the more subtle factors into consideration.

    Like others have said though, it would make me think twice about studying in London.
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    i'm thinking about study medicine abroad like charles uni in prague where they teach some courses in english, to avoid the fee increase
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    (Original post by maxpemberton)
    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
    To mirror what others have said, I would really love to study in London (and am hence travelling to three open days there), but I'm seriously questioning whether the extra debt is at all worth it when I could get the same qualification in a far cheaper area. Similarly I fear the increase in tuition fees may deter many medical students from taking intercalated degrees, which which can be useful for a more solid foundation of scientific knowledge.

    As to the fees detering people from medicine altogether: I don't think anyone that has really researched and is passionate about a career in medicine will be put off by the fees (excluding graduates ofcourse). At the end of the day it's a lifestyle choice as much as it's a career and doctors, even with the fee hike, will still earn enough to live more than comfortably. It is worth bearing in mind that, although they'll ofcourse have to pay more in the long run, junior doctors will be slightly better off under the new system with the threshold where you have to start paying off your debt being raised from £15,000 to £21,000.
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    (Original post by maxpemberton)
    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
    In my experience, the majority of medical students are distinctly middle class. In my group of friends at uni, I'm almost the token state school child. The others all attended 'prestigious' (therefore expensive) public schools. We all have professional parents who are paying our way through life. I realize that this is merely my experience and is not an accurate cross section of all medics backgrounds.

    Nevertheless, I must say that medicine at the moment is far from cheap, even in Scotland. Living costs, books etc all with less opportunities of finding time for part time work to help pay for.

    Fees of £9000 a year + may put a certain bracket of society (my own) off. But the colleagues previously mentioned I doubt would bat an eyelid at the extra expense.

    Medicine and law used to be a way for 'normal' people to bring themselves up to the level of the already privileged in society. They are now in danger of becoming courses solely for the wealthy, something which worries me greatly.
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    In my experience, the majority of medical students are distinctly middle class. In my group of friends at uni, I'm almost the token state school child. The others all attended 'prestigious' (therefore expensive) public schools. We all have professional parents who are paying our way through life. I realize that this is merely my experience and is not an accurate cross section of all medics backgrounds.

    Nevertheless, I must say that medicine at the moment is far from cheap, even in Scotland. Living costs, books etc all without the prospect of part time work to help pay for.

    Fees of £9000 a year + may put a certain bracket of society (my own) off. But the colleagues previously mentioned I doubt would bat an eyelid at the extra expense.

    Medicine and law used to be a way for 'normal' people to bring themselves up to the level of the already privileged in society. They are now in danger of becoming courses solely for the wealthy, something which worries me greatly.
    Re the bit in bold - seriously? It's perfectly possible to have a part time job, esp where we are, and I know people all the way up to finals year who are still working.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Re the bit in bold - seriously? It's perfectly possible to have a part time job, esp where we are, and I know people all the way up to finals year who are still working.
    My point was that it would perhaps be more difficult than other, less time consuming courses

    And I have yet to meet a single person in 1st year who has a job Though not I suspect because they couldn't find the time....
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    (Original post by maxpemberton)
    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
    I would say that courses such as medicine won't really be impacted upon that badly, simply as you do still have one of the most secure careers around....

    that said, many may be put of due to the time of the degree, especially those in london, where the living costs are much higher...

    the only ones IMO that will be affected are the graduate medics who will have to fully fund their degree themselves as they can't get a tuition loan....likewise, those on foundation courses who, by definition are from poorer backgrounds may be put off as their course is 6yrs and so may be put off by the even higher debts they will face....

    likewise, the growing problem of securing an F1 place will become a factor as well, as people see that they no longer have a definite job at the end, and may be left out with crippling debts and no job, despite being a highly trained professional
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    If I hadn't got a place this year I'd still be inclined to do Medicine as a school leaver, but if that failed and I went for another degree, I'd have a hard choice deciding whether to do a medicine degree after that.
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    (Original post by maxpemberton)
    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
    "Call Max Pemberton" and he turns up

    I'm a current medical student.

    My brother is doing his A Levels and is worried about the costs of medical school. He is very reluctant to apply to any six year courses due to the additional costs and is looking into studying medicine in Europe.

    It seems a great shame that he won't even consider intercalating because of the cost and he won't even apply to med schools which only offer 6 year courses.
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    I'm starting medicine this year through Graduate entry and come from a very (very) low income background...
    If I hadnt gotten a place this year I would not have even considered applying again next year because of fees.

    This year I had offers from Kings and Warwick, and although I would have loved to study at Kings, they only offered me a 5 year place and so I couldnt afford to accept it.

    I'm already extremely worried about how I will finance my time at university and if I was looking at 9k a year it would become impossible.
    Ive worked so hard to get where I am, its upsetting to find that money is still the biggest obstacle in my life.

    I think the increase in fees will affect medicines accessibility to a lot of people from low income families and certainly those taking the graduate entry route.
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    I'm currently in Year 12, and will be applying this October for medicine. The tuition fee increase has not put me off of attending medical school at all, as long as there are tuition fee loans to cover it while I'm at university. The main financial concern of mine is inflation heightening the cost of living, and maintenance loans still staying the same. I come from a relatively low income household of about £23k a year, so admittedly if there was no loan to cover the tuition fees I almost definitely would not be able to afford it, and choose something else.
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    (Original post by maxpemberton)
    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
    I had multiple offers in 2009 but became seriously ill through no fault of my own during my final exams and missed the grades narrowly. I applied a further 2 times after taking 2 gap years for 2010 and 2011 entry and was rejected from all without interview. The feedback i received suggested that resitting my A2s had too much of an effect compared with the applicant pool to give me an interview and that my application would benefit from doing a degree. 3 of the unis on my 3rd app strongly suggested i reapply as a grad as long as i keep up extra curriculars and get a 2.1.

    With the advent of this new tuition fee regime, I am very uncertain about whether another application is worth it because graduate entry is now my only option. As a pharmacy graduate I will be in about £20K of debt by the end of my degree and the average pharmacy pre-reg pays £25k so theoretically I would be one of the very few types of grads who could actually afford GEM fairly quickly after completing my degree. However there are other concerns such as mortgages, family, the amount of debt I would accrue by doing GEM and of course a lost salary. I calculated the other day that I would probably lose £160K in earnings if i was to do GEM. Normally this wouldn't have phased me at all but given the decreasing job security in medicine and the further development of pharmacy, it really is making me think twice, even though medicine is my first love and i would still cut my right arm off for it at the moment.

    Graduates are in a significantly far worse position than school leavers and widening access will go down the pan. Graduates just don't have this sort of money unless they work for a few years to raise the funds which of course delays other aspects of adult life.
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    (Original post by maxpemberton)
    Hello, wondering if anyone here might be able to help.
    I'm writing a feature for the Daily Telegraph looking at medical student debt and examining how the new legislation regarding increased tuition fees might impact on people deciding to do medical degrees, the types of people that will be put off, later career choices within medicine etc.
    I'd love to hear from any students that are thinking of applying to medical school and are worried about how they will pay their fees or are questioing if they are going to apply because of future debt. Also, anyone who has given up a course in medicine because of debt or facing problems because of debt?
    Thanks so much.
    Max
    I'm in my final year now, exams in 6 weeks! I seriously considered taking a year out at the beginning of this year because of financial problems. I couldn't find a job that could fit with my placements as I was travelling between two cities and I had exhausted every other avenue. Luckily I managed to sort things out but it was scary being so near and contemplating falling back a year. A big problem is that along with fees going up, all of the major banks have now removed their professional studies loans and that was my lifeline.

    I can see graduate students and those from non traditional backgrounds being put off big time. I work for the social mobility foundation with kids who are interested in medicine and whilst they understand the benefit of a good education, lots of them are terrified of the idea of debt. Coupled with the situation where graduates are no longer guaranteed jobs you can understand why people may now choose other avenues.

    When I was in my gap year I had a good job paying £10+ an hour with a pension and 6 weeks holiday a year. 7 years later i'm about to start my life as a doctor on the same wage plus £35,000 debt. I never ever did medicine for the money, but if the same scenario played out again only with £100,000 worth of debt and no guarantee of a job at the end, I may have just stayed put in that job.

    P.S. Apparently you are the keynote speaker at the fourth year conference this year? Won't be going as i'm away on placement but glad they got someone who lots of people will be aware of rather than a random scientist...
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    I think international students suffer an insane amount of debt O.o
 
 
 
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