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Scottish Money watch

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    (Original post by No Future)
    Your manager sounds like an idiot. It's the same currency
    A key skill in employment is the ability to follow instructions. If company policy is not to accept certain notes then everyone would be well advised not to accept them. The reasons behind them not being accepted some places are stated above. When it's your business, you can let people pay for things with jelly babies if you like but until then....
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    (Original post by Vinchenko)
    See my post - scottish notes are NEVER considered legal tender.
    Legal tender only matters when you are settling a debt, though. It is irrelevant when buying goods as parties to the contract can choose any method of payment they like.
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    Scottish accent : I'll have you know pal, It's LEGAL tender...
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    (Original post by alibee)
    A key skill in employment is the ability to follow instructions.
    I'm employed, what's your point?

    Pounds are pounds, despite some minor technicality.
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    I actually studied this in law.

    Scottish notes aren't legal tender - therefore a shop isn't breaking a law for not accepting them. The only legal tender in England and Wales are Bank of England notes. some shops do accept Scottish notes as they are an acceptable means of payment but both parties involved in the transaction have to agree.

    A lot of shops tend not to accept them because their staff haven't been trained on spotting fakes.
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    (Original post by crazycake93)
    Scottish accent : I'll have you know pal, It's LEGAL tender...
    <3 Frankie Boyle!
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    (Original post by NeoNerd)
    It isn't. Scottish money is a promissary note - a promise by the bank to provide you with legal tender on demand. They are accepted as currency in Scotland through custom, not through nay legal obligation to accept them.

    However, I completely agree that it's a royal pain in the arse when you can't spend them in England.
    Scottish money actually has the status of 'legal currency'.

    All banknotes are 'promissory notes' in that they are backed with a 'promise to pay the bearer on demand' a sum equivalent in gold/silver etc. They are, however, on a different statutory footing to other promissory notes.

    And legal tender is irrelevant when buying goods: freedom of contract means any party is free to accept any form of payment they wish.
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    (Original post by Celtic_Anthony)
    Legal tender only matters when you are settling a debt, though. It is irrelevant when buying goods as parties to the contract can choose any method of payment they like.
    As I said in the post I was referring to, with my example of trying to use an Ox to pay in a restaurant...
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    (Original post by Vinchenko)
    <3 Frankie Boyle!
    <3 U:perv:
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    (Original post by crazycake93)
    Scottish accent : I'll have you know pal, It's LEGAL tender...
    I actually said this to a woman in Sainsbury in Coventry once. It was before Michael McCintyre popularised it though.

    She just kept saying "Oh we don't want any trouble sir, we don't want any trouble."
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    (Original post by Celtic_Anthony)
    Scottish money actually has the status of 'legal currency'.

    All banknotes are 'promissory notes' in that they are backed with a 'promise to pay the bearer on demand' a sum equivalent in gold/silver etc. They are, however, on a different statutory footing to other promissory notes.

    And legal tender is irrelevant when buying goods: freedom of contract means any party is free to accept any form of payment they wish.
    We're not on the Gold Standard any more! In england they simply have to repay you in legal tender, which (for any amount) is £1/£2/£5/£10/£20/£50. In Scotland, they would have to repay you in £1 or £2 coins...though originally promissory notes, the issues are more complicated now the currency isn't backed by any tangible assets.
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    (Original post by Vinchenko)
    We're not on the Gold Standard any more! In england they simply have to repay you in legal tender, which (for any amount) is £1/£2/£5/£10/£20/£50. In Scotland, they would have to repay you in £1 or £2 coins...though originally promissory notes, the issues are more complicated now the currency isn't backed by any tangible assets.
    Aye, Bank of England securities is it not that they are backed by?

    And can they not give you gold and silver anyway? I would much rather have that...
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    (Original post by crazycake93)
    <3 U:perv:
    flattered!
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    (Original post by Prime500)
    I actually said this to a woman in Sainsbury in Coventry once. It was before Michael McCintyre popularised it though.

    She just kept saying "Oh we don't want any trouble sir, we don't want any trouble."
    Must've been awkward..

    What's the exchange rate like? i'm thinking about heading up to Scotland for the weekend.
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    (Original post by Vinchenko)
    As I said in the post I was referring to, with my example of trying to use an Ox to pay in a restaurant...
    Yeah, read back there, fair play!

    Bloody English. At least Scotland has an 'any reasonable means of payment' law...
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    (Original post by No Future)
    I'm employed, what's your point?

    Pounds are pounds, despite some minor technicality.
    If you are charged extra for banking those notes, why should you take them? It really depends on your banking procedures and perhaps you would be willing to absorb some extra costs to be generally helpful as a retailer. If customers were willing to accept these notes as change freely then there would be very little problem. As it stands, they often won't, mainly because a lot of places won't accept them. It's a vicious cycle.

    I don't have any personal problem with accepting Scottish notes and my current employer are happy for us to take them. If they said not to, it doesn't make me an "idiot" if I don't. I'm not paying the wage bill, they can make up whatever policy they like.
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    (Original post by Celtic_Anthony)
    Aye, Bank of England securities is it not that they are backed by?

    And can they not give you gold and silver anyway? I would much rather have that...
    Given gold prices at the moment, it might be quite hard to give you 1/895th of a troy ounce for every pound coin...
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    what you got there love is LEGAL TENDERRRR!
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    I think its ridiculous Scottish notes aren't regarded as on par with English notes. They both promise the same thing. The Queen can go take a **** to herself and get her napper aff ma banknotes if they ain't recognised by her Royal bank.
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    (Original post by NeoNerd)
    Given gold prices at the moment, it might be quite hard to give you 1/895th of a troy ounce for every pound coin...
    It would be nice of them to try, though.
 
 
 
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