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Eating Disorders and life with one - Discussions, Opinions, Advice. watch

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    (Original post by 05autyt)
    That's what I mean though. I think I'll just stop eating :/ But I'm so excited to go so I'm looking at it like a fresh start!



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    You won't. If anything, you'll feel more comfortable because no one is there to worry and patronise you; at least that's how I felt when I moved to uni. x


    (Original post by MelissaJayne)
    Amazing article Jazzy. X
    Thank you hun x
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    (Original post by jazzykinks)
    You won't. If anything, you'll feel more comfortable because no one is there to worry and patronise you; at least that's how I felt when I moved to uni. x




    Thank you hun x
    I really hope so! Thank you for reassuring me


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    I get a huge amount of people messaging, and I'll definitely agree that merely passing on my knowledge, helpful or not, is a huge boon. X
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    Posted from TSR Mobile

    I'm worried. I'm getting obsessed with numbers and calories.
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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    I'm worried. I'm getting obsessed with numbers and calories.
    Someone might disagree with me here

    Why counting calories is stupid:

    - A calorie = a calorie is a myth in my opinion. It is the amount of energy it takes to raise 1g of water by 1 °C... but this is measured in a lab. Who KNOWS how much of your apple/chocolate bar/yoghurt your digestive system chooses to absorb or convert into energy, and in what way, and by what process? Does your body use protein in the same way as it uses carbohydrate? Who knows how well your metabolism creates energy? You don't know! And there is a lot of controversy about how accurate the food companies are with their ingredients anyway (horses...fibre calories etc..)

    Think about it. How many calories are there in an apple? It depends on the size of the apple, the sweetness, what type it is, whether you nibble right down to the core... it goes on and on! At the end of the day it's a natural product and is has things in it that your body needs.

    - It takes up so much of your time and thought processes that it distracts you from what is actually important

    - It encourages you to eat in a disordered way and not listen to actual hunger signals.

    - It stops you from enjoying food

    - It's just not natural!!!!!

    So calorie counting isn't really totally about the food. It's needing to control something in your life. Is this something you need to address?
    Once you start thinking about food in terms of what it can offer your body, and of course how tasty it is, the sooner you can start living a happy life!

    Look after yourself x
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    (Original post by Cinnie)
    Someone might disagree with me here

    Why counting calories is stupid:

    - A calorie = a calorie is a myth in my opinion. It is the amount of energy it takes to raise 1g of water by 1 °C... but this is measured in a lab. Who KNOWS how much of your apple/chocolate bar/yoghurt your digestive system chooses to absorb or convert into energy, and in what way, and by what process? Does your body use protein in the same way as it uses carbohydrate? Who knows how well your metabolism creates energy? You don't know! And there is a lot of controversy about how accurate the food companies are with their ingredients anyway (horses...fibre calories etc..)

    Think about it. How many calories are there in an apple? It depends on the size of the apple, the sweetness, what type it is, whether you nibble right down to the core... it goes on and on! At the end of the day it's a natural product and is has things in it that your body needs.

    - It takes up so much of your time and thought processes that it distracts you from what is actually important

    - It encourages you to eat in a disordered way and not listen to actual hunger signals.

    - It stops you from enjoying food

    - It's just not natural!!!!!

    So calorie counting isn't really totally about the food. It's needing to control something in your life. Is this something you need to address?
    Once you start thinking about food in terms of what it can offer your body, and of course how tasty it is, the sooner you can start living a happy life!

    Look after yourself x
    Cannot agree with this more. The sooner you can stop counting calories the easier it will be. Eat food, not numbers!
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    (Original post by Cinnie)
    Someone might disagree with me here

    Why counting calories is stupid:

    - A calorie = a calorie is a myth in my opinion. It is the amount of energy it takes to raise 1g of water by 1 °C... but this is measured in a lab. Who KNOWS how much of your apple/chocolate bar/yoghurt your digestive system chooses to absorb or convert into energy, and in what way, and by what process? Does your body use protein in the same way as it uses carbohydrate? Who knows how well your metabolism creates energy? You don't know! And there is a lot of controversy about how accurate the food companies are with their ingredients anyway (horses...fibre calories etc..)

    Think about it. How many calories are there in an apple? It depends on the size of the apple, the sweetness, what type it is, whether you nibble right down to the core... it goes on and on! At the end of the day it's a natural product and is has things in it that your body needs.

    - It takes up so much of your time and thought processes that it distracts you from what is actually important

    - It encourages you to eat in a disordered way and not listen to actual hunger signals.

    - It stops you from enjoying food

    - It's just not natural!!!!!

    So calorie counting isn't really totally about the food. It's needing to control something in your life. Is this something you need to address?
    Once you start thinking about food in terms of what it can offer your body, and of course how tasty it is, the sooner you can start living a happy life!

    Look after yourself x
    Hear, hear!

    I mean, how far can we trust what the packet says anyway? We should probably be measuring our food in horse power now...
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    (Original post by Cinnie)
    Someone might disagree with me here

    Why counting calories is stupid:

    - A calorie = a calorie is a myth in my opinion. It is the amount of energy it takes to raise 1g of water by 1 °C... but this is measured in a lab. Who KNOWS how much of your apple/chocolate bar/yoghurt your digestive system chooses to absorb or convert into energy, and in what way, and by what process? Does your body use protein in the same way as it uses carbohydrate? Who knows how well your metabolism creates energy? You don't know! And there is a lot of controversy about how accurate the food companies are with their ingredients anyway (horses...fibre calories etc..)

    [snip]
    Look after yourself x
    THIIIIIIS! Toto, you've got competition,
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    Sorry to disrupt the positive flow of the thread lately, it's encouraging to see it . However, has anyone here had issues with binges and hunger when on olanzapine in recovery from Anorexia?

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    On Tuesday morning I started by wanting a little bit of chocolate and ended up eating a massive whole chocolate bar (one of the multiple servings ones), a giant chocolate coin, and a large chocolate Santa, all before 9am). I rushed myself to the hospital due to the dangerous thoughts I had of doing to myself after due to the guilt and shame, and spent the rest of the day down my grandparents away from food in a different environment to calm me down. Now today I've binged on muesli (ate a quarter of 1.5kg bag), again in the morning, though apart from skipping lunch I've stuck to my meal plan for the rest of the day. I feel so awful and disgusted for these binges, and it's really bringing me down. Does anyone have any advice? Should I ask my doctor to take me off olanzapine? I feel hungry all the time, despite sticking to my meal plan.
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    (Original post by JLW95)
    Sorry to disrupt the positive flow of the thread lately, it's encouraging to see it . However, has anyone here had issues with binges and hunger when on olanzapine in recovery from Anorexia?

    Spoiler:
    Show
    On Tuesday morning I started by wanting a little bit of chocolate and ended up eating a massive whole chocolate bar (one of the multiple servings ones), a giant chocolate coin, and a large chocolate Santa, all before 9am). I rushed myself to the hospital due to the dangerous thoughts I had of doing to myself after due to the guilt and shame, and spent the rest of the day down my grandparents away from food in a different environment to calm me down. Now today I've binged on muesli (ate a quarter of 1.5kg bag), again in the morning, though apart from skipping lunch I've stuck to my meal plan for the rest of the day. I feel so awful and disgusted for these binges, and it's really bringing me down. Does anyone have any advice? Should I ask my doctor to take me off olanzapine? I feel hungry all the time, despite sticking to my meal plan.
    I haven't taken olanzapine, but you may be experiencing 'extreme hunger', which is really really common. It's where your body realises there is now food available where there previously wasn't, and it wants you to eat everything because every cell is so starved of energy and nutrients. Even when your stomach is full, your brain is still being told it's starving, so it releases hunger signals. This just takes time, but does go. Don't feel disgusted it's totally normal, you can try to distract yourself though and the binge urge often goes after 20 minutes.
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    (Original post by Cinnie)
    I haven't taken olanzapine, but you may be experiencing 'extreme hunger', which is really really common. It's where your body realises there is now food available where there previously wasn't, and it wants you to eat everything because every cell is so starved of energy and nutrients. Even when your stomach is full, your brain is still being told it's starving, so it releases hunger signals. This just takes time, but does go. Don't feel disgusted it's totally normal, you can try to distract yourself though and the binge urge often goes after 20 minutes.
    I second this. It's difficult to control hunger at this point, especially since resisting what you feel to be hunger may feel like old habits. I found it really useful to set myself structured meals til' all this passed, making sure I was getting enough nutrients/calories to continue with recovery. For a while it did feel like a backwards step almost as I was trying to let go of control over my diet but I know it was necessary and aided me in getting through a hard and confusing physical stage.
    • #75
    #75

    (Original post by 05autyt)
    I'm starting Uni in September and I have a feeling it's going to be really bad for me :/ trying to think of it as a new start though
    I thought exactly this too, but the entire opposite happened. I feared that I'd use uni as a free pass to slip back into unhealthy habits but being a uni and despite not having a hugely structured life didn't hinder anything. Having friends there if you need them and no-one watching you is such a relief that I've found myself just getting on with my life once again. A fresh start is what you need and it's what you'll get. New starts don't come around easily so use it to your advantage, don't waste an amazing opportunity. Do what you're meant to do at uni - meet new people, have fun and work hard, don't let this ruin your chances.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I thought exactly this too, but the entire opposite happened. I feared that I'd use uni as a free pass to slip back into unhealthy habits but being a uni and despite not having a hugely structured life didn't hinder anything. Having friends there if you need them and no-one watching you is such a relief that I've found myself just getting on with my life once again. A fresh start is what you need and it's what you'll get. New starts don't come around easily so use it to your advantage, don't waste an amazing opportunity. Do what you're meant to do at uni - meet new people, have fun and work hard, don't let this ruin your chances.
    Thank you for this I am also applying for September and am so worried that I will quickly get too ill to continue... It's nice to hear that other people have coped (Well done by the way!)


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    Just worried about being well enough to get into uni now :/ I was in hospital over the summer and kept myself relatively ok until just before Christmas.... My nan committed suicide and I had exams, and since then I've been losing weight and my meal plan has gone out of the window. And right now my depression is just too much to be able to cope with it all and get back on track. Hopefully starting some new meds soon, but sometimes I just get to the point of feeling like giving up. I've been in hospital twice now and relapsed both times, and attempts at recovery in the community just haven't been successful no matter how hard I try. I think I really need a fresh start and to be somewhere else; bad things have happened around here and I have had therapy, but I can't really come to terms with what happened when the people involved live around the corner and even though they don't recognise me any more, I'm terrified of them.


    Sorry for the negativity, just been a bad day.

    Here's to tomorrow :fluffy:
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    (Original post by Gnome :))
    Thank you for this I am also applying for September and am so worried that I will quickly get too ill to continue... It's nice to hear that other people have coped (Well done by the way!)


    Spoiler:
    Show
    Just worried about being well enough to get into uni now :/ I was in hospital over the summer and kept myself relatively ok until just before Christmas.... My nan committed suicide and I had exams, and since then I've been losing weight and my meal plan has gone out of the window. And right now my depression is just too much to be able to cope with it all and get back on track. Hopefully starting some new meds soon, but sometimes I just get to the point of feeling like giving up. I've been in hospital twice now and relapsed both times, and attempts at recovery in the community just haven't been successful no matter how hard I try. I think I really need a fresh start and to be somewhere else; bad things have happened around here and I have had therapy, but I can't really come to terms with what happened when the people involved live around the corner and even though they don't recognise me any more, I'm terrified of them.


    Sorry for the negativity, just been a bad day.

    Here's to tomorrow :fluffy:
    Sorry to hear you're having such a hard time right now. This might not be very helpful, but can you use going to university in September as motivation to try your absolute hardest to be well enough? I know it isn't always that simple but I know so many people who have found it helpful to have something positive to work towards in their recovery, a 'reason to recover' if you will. It might push you to really challenge yourself now rather than let it drag on longer and longer. Just a thought and I wish you all the best.
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    Thanks Cinnie and Melissa . I've tried to structure my meals to make sure they are balanced and enough calories to recover, yet I still have the urge to binge. For the past few days I've been forcing myself out of the house to resist the urge as I feel as though I can't control myself . Though I am sort of reassured it isn't unusual; and I suppose now that I'm reliably eating enough to recover my body doesn't want to risk being deficient in intake again.
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    (Original post by sentiment)
    Sorry to hear you're having such a hard time right now. This might not be very helpful, but can you use going to university in September as motivation to try your absolute hardest to be well enough? I know it isn't always that simple but I know so many people who have found it helpful to have something positive to work towards in their recovery, a 'reason to recover' if you will. It might push you to really challenge yourself now rather than let it drag on longer and longer. Just a thought and I wish you all the best.
    Thank you

    I am trying to use that as my motivation, and it was working for a while. But, unfortunately, I guess you know what it's like and it is bloody hard to keep on the right track
    • #142
    #142

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I thought exactly this too, but the entire opposite happened. I feared that I'd use uni as a free pass to slip back into unhealthy habits but being a uni and despite not having a hugely structured life didn't hinder anything. Having friends there if you need them and no-one watching you is such a relief that I've found myself just getting on with my life once again. A fresh start is what you need and it's what you'll get. New starts don't come around easily so use it to your advantage, don't waste an amazing opportunity. Do what you're meant to do at uni - meet new people, have fun and work hard, don't let this ruin your chances.
    I really really hope this happens. I'm already a year later than everyone else. I dont want to waste another year of my life. I'm worried because Durham is where I'm firming but its so sports based and competitive. But hopefully wanting to go so much will work in a positive way for me
    • #75
    #75

    (Original post by Gnome :))
    Thank you for this I am also applying for September and am so worried that I will quickly get too ill to continue... It's nice to hear that other people have coped (Well done by the way!)

    Sorry for the negativity, just been a bad day.

    Here's to tomorrow :fluffy:
    We all have our good days and all have our bad days but sometimes the constant angst of having people watching you and almost feeling as if you have to behave how they expect to you to can hinder recovery. Being away from home gives you chance to be who you want to be and be able to recover without being praised which comes free with guilt. When I do have good days, I'm allowed to be happy about it myself and not having people watching me means I don't feel guilty as it no longer seems like such a big thing.

    I'm sorry to hear about the situation you've found yourself in but despite choosing myself not to accept it, uni's do offer help. It's certainly worth looking into it. Knowing how much you both want and need this new start will hopefully give you a stronger incentive to improve but you can't hide behind or ignore everything that has happened. Going to uni may allow you to 'forget' but remember it's only temporary. You still have to get better. If you ever want to talk to anyone about coping with uni, just quote me and I'll message you Good Luck x
    • #81
    #81

    Hi, anyone here have any past experience with psychotherapy? Good experience or waste of time? thanks.
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    Yesterday was strange. I saw mental health services (CAMHS) and it went well I think. Had to talk about my issues with food, I got weighed, measured and blood pressure. The only bad thing is they dont measure you in pounds and stones. They weigh you in kg so the number looks smaller than it does on scales when you weigh in pounds or stones. They're having a meeting on monday to discuss my needs
 
 
 
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