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    There are so many arguments for this I won't bother to start, but if it was then something would probably be done about it, the only thing I would say is it should be in ALL schools that they start in year 9.
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    (Original post by beffnee)
    That's my point. A Levels are harder, and cover topics in more depth than GCSEs do. But you only have two years in which to learn for them (Or a year for each (AS/A2) if you want to look at it that way). You have two years to learn less material for GCSEs. If you had five years to learn that material, the amount that people would struggle the next year would be insane. Think about how many people complain about the jump as it is.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm sure a lot of people could cope with doing GCSEs earlier than that in subjects they excel in, but for a start - as you say, people mess about in those earlier years. But as I have said, you need the skills from the earlier years in order to take your GCSEs. If you compare your learning style and way you interacted with work at the end of Y6, to the end of Y9, I am sure you would see a great difference. The extra years add maturity also. But as someone else has mentioned, there would need to be a lot more covered in order to warrant it.

    If the system had been failing since the time of O Levels, it would have been changed. Aspects of it have been changed in that time. The fact that this element of it has remained the same for decades suggests that it is the right system. Starting GCSEs earlier will lead to worse results either because people will just mess about instead of working, or because they lack the skills they would have learned in those three years in order to complete the exams sufficiently.
    But if we didn't have exams, surely people in year 11 would be messing around too?
    Throw in exams and maybe people will be serious.

    (Original post by twelve)
    So, you spread out the exams, and then somebody who took their Geography exam in year 7 is going to have forgotten everything they ever knew about Geography by the end of year 11.

    This person would probably never consider doing Geography as an A level - as they've only spent a month or so intensively learning it. And if they did decide to do Geography, then how would they cope?
    What if people took exams that they didn't care about at the beginning?
    But once again, it boils down to maturity.
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    (Original post by dabest2500)
    What if people took exams that they didn't care about at the beginning?
    But once again, it boils down to maturity.
    Yes, maturity you just don't have at age 11. Imagine going from year 6, when no serious work was really done - I remember spending the whole of friday afternoons doing art and ict, which weren't real lessons then. And wednesday afternoon was PE, and we had a music lesson which was just singing at some point as well. You can't just go from that, to GCSE's. People just won't be ready.
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    (Original post by twelve)
    Yes, maturity you just don't have at age 11. Imagine going from year 6, when no serious work was really done - I remember spending the whole of friday afternoons doing art and ict, which weren't real lessons then. And wednesday afternoon was PE, and we had a music lesson which was just singing at some point as well. You can't just go from that, to GCSE's. People just won't be ready.
    There was a 6 year old at my Primary school who did GCSE Maths and got a D :eek:

    (Original post by seasons of wither)
    I Am Sorry You Are Feeling Stressed, OP
    Aren't we all
    But I should count myself lucky with 13 exams.
    Some people out there have 25!
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    (Original post by dabest2500)
    There was a 6 year old at my Primary school who did GCSE Maths and got a D :eek:
    So you shown ONE person can do it. But what about the other thousands?
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    (Original post by dabest2500)
    But if we didn't have exams, surely people in year 11 would be messing around too?
    Throw in exams and maybe people will be serious.



    What if people took exams that they didn't care about at the beginning?
    But once again, it boils down to maturity.
    You are refusing to accept, or even consider, the perfectly valid arguments that myself and twelve have given you. I have given you my point of view, I can't be bothered to labour it. By year 11, you are more mature than you are in year 7. This is not a result of exams but simply of growing up. You need those three years in order to grow up so that you WILL devote time to your exams. Plenty of people don't, but that is their choice. However the percentage of people who don't care by year 11 is much lower than it would be if they were aged 11 or 12.
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    (Original post by beffnee)
    You are refusing to accept, or even consider, the perfectly valid arguments that myself and twelve have given you. I have given you my point of view, I can't be bothered to labour it. By year 11, you are more mature than you are in year 7. This is not a result of exams but simply of growing up. You need those three years in order to grow up so that you WILL devote time to your exams. Plenty of people don't, but that is their choice. However the percentage of people who don't care by year 11 is much lower than it would be if they were aged 11 or 12.
    What have I done wrong this time?
    I've read your arguments and agree with the points on the lack of maturity.
    :confused::confused::confused:
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    (Original post by dabest2500)
    What have I done wrong this time?
    I've read your arguments and agree with the points on the lack of maturity.
    :confused::confused::confused:
    Thats the annoying part - you are agreeing with our points, but refusing to accept that actually, your idea WOULDN'T WORK.
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    (Original post by twelve)
    Thats the annoying part - you are agreeing with our points, but refusing to accept that actually, your idea WOULDN'T WORK.
    Since I'm agreeing with your points, shouldn't that automatically mean that my argument is lost?
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    (Original post by dabest2500)
    Since I'm agreeing with your points, shouldn't that automatically mean that my argument is lost?
    Yes exactly - but you're still arguing it!
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    (Original post by twelve)
    Yes exactly - but you're still arguing it!
    Oh come on!
    give me a break, my idea was bad and I lost.
    I'm an idiot, happy now
 
 
 
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