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    Just wanted to confirm the correct pronunciation of judges title.
    e.g. Edmund-Davies J would be Lord Justice Edmund-Davies or just Lord Edmund-Davies
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    No.

    1. If he is just Edmund-Davies J then he is styled Mr Justice Edmund-Davies (a High Court Judge)
    2. If he is Edmund-Davies LJ then he is styled Lord Justice Edmund Davies (a Court of Appeal Judge)
    3. If he is Lord Edmund-Davies, well that speaks for itself (a House of Lords or Supreme Court Judge)

    Obviously judges have different titles depending on what stage of their career they are. However, the fact that a High Court judge later rises to become a Court of Appeal judge, or a Law Lord, does not change the title they are given (i.e. Mr Justice) if they made a decision in the High Court. The same applies to a Court of Appeal judge who then rises to the House of Lords or Supreme Court.

    E.g. Lord Denning eventually became a Law Lord, and then decided to demote himself back to the Court of Appeal as Master of the Rolls. However when he made his famous judgment in the High Trees case, he was a High Court judge. So when citing that judgment you'd say- "the decision of Denning J (Mr Justice Denning) in High Trees".
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    (Original post by AdamTJ)
    No.

    1. If he is just Edmund-Davies J then he is styled Mr Justice Edmund-Davies (a High Court Judge)
    2. If he is Edmund-Davies LJ then he is styled Lord Justice Edmund Davies (a Court of Appeal Judge)
    3. If he is Lord Edmund-Davies, well that speaks for itself (a House of Lords or Supreme Court Judge)

    Obviously judges have different titles depending on what stage of their career they are. However, the fact that a High Court judge later rises to become a Court of Appeal judge, or a Law Lord, does not change the title they are given (i.e. Mr Justice) if they made a decision in the High Court. The same applies to a Court of Appeal judge who then rises to the House of Lords or Supreme Court.

    E.g. Lord Denning eventually became a Law Lord, and then decided to demote himself back to the Court of Appeal as Master of the Rolls. However when he made his famous judgment in the High Trees case, he was a High Court judge. So when citing that judgment you'd say- "the decision of Denning J (Mr Justice Denning) in High Trees".
    I'm still a novice as far as mooting goes, but would you say "Mr Justice Denning as he then was" to make clear that you know he's subsequently been promoted? I think that's what I've been told but I appreciate that it elongates the sentence!
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    You can do that if you wish. I do that myself for exactly the reason you point out and I think it adds a nice touch, but it's a question of personal style.
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    (Original post by AdamTJ)
    You can do that if you wish. I do that myself for exactly the reason you point out and I think it adds a nice touch, but it's a question of personal style.
    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    I'm still a novice as far as mooting goes, but would you say "Mr Justice Denning as he then was" to make clear that you know he's subsequently been promoted? I think that's what I've been told but I appreciate that it elongates the sentence!
    This is really useful, Thanks!
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    I'm still a novice as far as mooting goes, but would you say "Mr Justice Denning as he then was" to make clear that you know he's subsequently been promoted? I think that's what I've been told but I appreciate that it elongates the sentence!
    The QC judging a moot I competed in said, in so many words, that this form should be used. I don't think it's so much a point of style as a mark of respect. It might rub a judge the wrong way *not* to use this form, where you're unlikely to offend if you do use it. (It's also worth noting that if a judge has subsequently been promoted it might well lend more weight to a first instance decision than it would otherwise have. There are also judges who are highly-regarded on a particular area of law--Goff on restitution, Millett on equity, Bingham on human rights, Neuberger on chancery/property, Hale on family--so if they make a statement on that area it is more likely to carry weight.)
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    The QC judging a moot I competed in said, in so many words, that this form should be used. I don't think it's so much a point of style as a mark of respect. It might rub a judge the wrong way *not* to use this form, where you're unlikely to offend if you do use it. (It's also worth noting that if a judge has subsequently been promoted it might well lend more weight to a first instance decision than it would otherwise have. There are also judges who are highly-regarded on a particular area of law--Goff on restitution, Millett on equity, Bingham on human rights, Neuberger on chancery/property, Hale on family--so if they make a statement on that area it is more likely to carry weight.)
    Good to know, thanks.

    (Was that the Cuppers final? I was sitting behind you! :giggle:)
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    Good to know, thanks.

    (Was that the Cuppers final? I was sitting behind you! :giggle:)
    Yeah, it was. Lol, were you?!
 
 
 
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