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    120/150 ums
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    (Original post by stuffedfigs)
    120/150 ums
    i think he might have meant raw marks, if not i wanna know anyway.. anyone know roughly what the raw marks is for an A, B, etc?
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    (Original post by stuffedfigs)
    120/150 ums
    I always think it's hard but still 80% for an A? God bless x
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    well since it's out of 100 then you'd expect around 80 for A, 70 for B etc...
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    (Original post by 41jms)
    i think he might have meant raw marks, if not i wanna know anyway.. anyone know roughly what the raw marks is for an A, B, etc?
    Ya you got it as I guess sometimes they do lower the mark boundaries?
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    oh its out of 100?!

    ~20 for section A
    ~40 for B
    ~40 for C

    is it? or like legacy, 20 for A, 50 for B, so 30 for 7?
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    C*

    7 = c
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    (Original post by Jke)
    So how is everyone revising? Doing past papers? or CGP book mainly? Anyone have a collection of G495 questions?
    Be careful with the cgp book - some of the answers/info isn't very good and some of it is just totally incorrect! Like it says that there's a neutrino (or antineutrino - one of the two) released when a nucleus undergoes alpha decay which is complete nonsense because an equation like that wouldn't conserve lepton number unless an electron(or positron) was released too.

    Generally to everyone - I know the textbook is rubbish, but if you re-read it after doing past papers etc then you notice stuff that you didn't realise was in which makes everything make more sense. Like some stuff in chapter 17 I didn't realise we had to know until i did past papers but then I read the textbook and it was in there after all - just buried -.- Mind you, some of the textbook is just waffle but some of it's quite useful hahah!

    If I don't post on here again today then good luck to everyone for tomorrow - I'm sure we'll all get what we need with a bit of hard work + some luck! ^_^
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    could someone please explain what meridian and oblateness means?
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    What grades did you get in the feb 2011 paper?
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    (Original post by emzaz)
    Be careful with the cgp book - some of the answers/info isn't very good and some of it is just totally incorrect! Like it says that there's a neutrino (or antineutrino - one of the two) released when a nucleus undergoes alpha decay which is complete nonsense because an equation like that wouldn't conserve lepton number unless an electron(or positron) was released too.

    Generally to everyone - I know the textbook is rubbish, but if you re-read it after doing past papers etc then you notice stuff that you didn't realise was in which makes everything make more sense. Like some stuff in chapter 17 I didn't realise we had to know until i did past papers but then I read the textbook and it was in there after all - just buried -.- Mind you, some of the textbook is just waffle but some of it's quite useful hahah!

    If I don't post on here again today then good luck to everyone for tomorrow - I'm sure we'll all get what we need with a bit of hard work + some luck! ^_^
    reali?Thanks for that. but i didn't reali have time to read the textbook as i'm still dealing with the lovely past papers LOL.. Well better be PASS papers
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    Anyone got some random physics questions (from g495) to ask me?
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    (Original post by Summerdays)
    Anyone got some random physics questions (from g495) to ask me?
    yes, what does meridian and oblateness mean
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    (Original post by JoeCarr)
    well since it's out of 100 then you'd expect around 80 for A, 70 for B etc...
    Although in practice more like 80-85 for an A*, 70-75 for an A etc.
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    (Original post by 41jms)
    yes, what does meridian and oblateness mean
    Haha, Yeah where the **** have you got that from..

    PS: I was wondering if anyone knew what are the main equations that equate that save you alot of time in the exam. Like I know the F=Bqv and Mv^2/r equate and that for circular motion of electrons in an electric field but what are the other's, I sort of want to get in the exam and just scribble them down to ease a bit of pressure.
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    (Original post by 41jms)
    yes, what does meridian and oblateness mean
    meridian is an imaginary line that extends from the north to south pole.

    Oblateness is basically an irregular sphere, in this case a sphere that bulges equatorially, and as consequence the north and south pole squash together. The reason, based on my understanding, for this is because when the earth is rotating the gravitational force from the centre of mass is greater - in order to provide a cetripetal force that causes the elements in the earth to rotate, the gravitational force must be greater than the force due to the pressure difference from the Earth's fluid mantle.

    What I don't understand is that in the first section C questions, posted in this thread, tension in the crust is mentioned as the source of this centripetal force, but it's not mentioned at all in the second set of ection C questions :confused:
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    (Original post by Hodgy93)
    Haha, Yeah where the **** have you got that from..

    PS: I was wondering if anyone knew what are the main equations that equate that save you alot of time in the exam. Like I know the F=Bqv and Mv^2/r equate and that for circular motion of electrons in an electric field but what are the other's, I sort of want to get in the exam and just scribble them down to ease a bit of pressure.
    kinetic energy = m^v^2/2m i.e.: kinetic energy = p2/2m, where p = momentum

    Kinetic energy = qV

    For a constant electric field, F/q = V/d

    Etot = Erest + Ekinetic

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    Januarys raw mark was 74/100 for an A , anyway if i don't post here again until after the exam good luck everyone!
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    (Original post by Summerdays)
    kinetic energy = m^v^2/2m i.e.: kinetic energy = p2/2m, where p = momentum

    Kinetic energy = qV

    For a constant electric field, F/q = V/d

    Etot = Erest + Ekinetic

    perhaps lamda = 2d/n comes up sometimes when deriving E= n^2h^2/8md^2 which is frankly a hideous formula.
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    (Original post by Birkatron)
    perhaps lamda = 2d/n comes up sometimes when deriving E= n^2h^2/8md^2 which is frankly a hideous formula.
    path difference = n xlambda (for constructive interference) Path difference = (0.5+n)lambda (for destructive interference.)

    The second equation is definitely something they will ask us to derive but it comes from E= p^2/2m, lambda = h/p and lambda = 2d/n - like you said
 
 
 
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