Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

I am really into military guy, which university shall I go to??? (HELP) watch

    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bianca_xox17)
    Hi guys, I know its really shallow but Im really into military guys and was wondering which university i should go to where I can meet lots of military men? Army or marine I dont mind but I was thinking of going to university of exeter which is quite near a military base... do you know any more?? ANd how could I meet more? xxxxx
    I'll be in southampton :sexface:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mithra)
    In case I don't get to say it once you join, good job killing all those civilians.
    Your welcome.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Drewski)
    :rolleyes:


    Sigh, I guess it's been a while since the last ignorant-bashing-of-all-servicemen-ever thread. Nice to know you can always rely on TSR to bring out the really knowledgable cretins...
    Don't assume its ignorance thanks.
    http://www.thenews.com.pk/NewsDetail.aspx?ID=7016
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38823715..._central_asia/
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...567985708.html
    http://articles.latimes.com/2009/may...on/oe-mcmanus3

    I do by and large support the military but there's a difference between a few unfortunate civilian deaths and.. this.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mithra)
    Don't assume its ignorance thanks.

    I do by and large support the military but there's a difference between a few unfortunate civilian deaths and.. this.
    I know it's going to ignore a portion of your argument, but I don't class the CIA as military. They don't follow the same rules and aren't subjected to the same level of scrutiny and post-operation analysis. To claim that all people in every Armed Force around the world are the same as those few within the CIA obsessed with US interests alone is, in my opinion, to border on the ignorant. And even then, to lump members of the British Armed Forces with the Americans who have very different RoEs is again churlish at best.

    Nobody's perfect, and frankly I'm glad that there's human error out there, because it means there are still humans involved in the process, which is better than the alternative. Doing the right thing will never be perfectly safe, as much as everyone absolutely strives towards it. I can assure you that at no point during any of the training I ever went through in the RAF was I, or any of my colleagues, told to kill civilians.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Drewski)
    I know it's going to ignore a portion of your argument, but I don't class the CIA as military. They don't follow the same rules and aren't subjected to the same level of scrutiny and post-operation analysis. To claim that all people in every Armed Force around the world are the same as those few within the CIA obsessed with US interests alone is, in my opinion, to border on the ignorant. And even then, to lump members of the British Armed Forces with the Americans who have very different RoEs is again churlish at best.

    Nobody's perfect, and frankly I'm glad that there's human error out there, because it means there are still humans involved in the process, which is better than the alternative. Doing the right thing will never be perfectly safe, as much as everyone absolutely strives towards it. I can assure you that at no point during any of the training I ever went through in the RAF was I, or any of my colleagues, told to kill civilians.
    Baha, I am glad to hear that :p:.

    Seriously though, I know the Americans do seem to be far worse for this kind of stuff than our armed forces, and that everyone is human so mistakes are made and its all very well for me sitting at home to complain. I honestly don't blame the soldiers themselves (most of the time), more the general attitude towards civilian deaths. Of course it doesn't help that we happily hand prisoners to Iraqi forces we know are most likely going to torture them. Though I think calling anything we are doing in Iraq at the moment 'the right thing' is kinda funny.

    As is the government's claim that our actions wrt Libya are to protect the civilian population, but thats an entirely different issue :nothing:.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mithra)
    In case I don't get to say it once you join, good job killing all those civilians.
    Ok so from that I deduced that you believe people like us shouldn't join the militery, ok let's go with that... so let's now fast forward 22 years.. noone has joined for 22 years, we now have no military, oh hi every high powerful country invading us...

    Do you really want that for a future? Cuz I know I don't...

    Kelvin
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by chef-for-raf)
    Ok so from that I deduced that you believe people like us shouldn't join the militery, ok let's go with that... so let's now fast forward 22 years.. noone has joined for 22 years, we now have no military, oh hi every high powerful country invading us...

    Do you really want that for a future? Cuz I know I don't...

    Kelvin
    Don't remember saying no-one should join the military. I massively dislike the way the government deploys our forces at the moment in addition to the (mostly american) attitude displayed by some forces but that doesn't mean I disagree with it in principle.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mithra)
    Baha, I am glad to hear that :p:.

    Seriously though, I know the Americans do seem to be far worse for this kind of stuff than our armed forces, and that everyone is human so mistakes are made and its all very well for me sitting at home to complain. I honestly don't blame the soldiers themselves (most of the time), more the general attitude towards civilian deaths. Of course it doesn't help that we happily hand prisoners to Iraqi forces we know are most likely going to torture them. Though I think calling anything we are doing in Iraq at the moment 'the right thing' is kinda funny.

    As is the government's claim that our actions wrt Libya are to protect the civilian population, but thats an entirely different issue :nothing:.
    Well, the last British forces removed themselves from Iraq in 2007, "we're" not doing anything there - at least, the Armed Forces aren't.

    To be honest, the Americans seem worse for 2 main reasons, 1- the afforementioned RoEs and 2- they simply do a hell of a lot more, so are bound to make more mistakes as a result. Unfortunate, yes, but that's humanity.

    Ok, the reaction could be more, but at the same time, what else can we/they do? Are we supposed to stop all operations and individually mourn every single person? The accidents - because that's what they are - are tragic, but that doesn;t mean we should stop everything and stop aiming for the wider goal because of it. We don't stop when our servicemen get killed, we have a mission. If our soldiers and their commanders broke down every time we made a mistake, no matter what the circumstances, we wouldn't have a functioning Armed Forces at all. It's not a lack of compassion, it's just a different focus, a different values set.

    The mandate for action in Libya as set out by the UN is pretty clear. We are operating a no-fly zone to protect civilians. That's all our Armed Forces are doing. Don't mistake the actions of the Government and FCO [the handing out or surplus kit to the rebels] with the actions of the RAF who are doing their best considering they've got sod-all equipment at the moment.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Drewski)
    Well, the last British forces removed themselves from Iraq in 2007, "we're" not doing anything there - at least, the Armed Forces aren't.

    To be honest, the Americans seem worse for 2 main reasons, 1- the afforementioned RoEs and 2- they simply do a hell of a lot more, so are bound to make more mistakes as a result. Unfortunate, yes, but that's humanity.

    Ok, the reaction could be more, but at the same time, what else can we/they do? Are we supposed to stop all operations and individually mourn every single person? The accidents - because that's what they are - are tragic, but that doesn;t mean we should stop everything and stop aiming for the wider goal because of it. We don't stop when our servicemen get killed, we have a mission. If our soldiers and their commanders broke down every time we made a mistake, no matter what the circumstances, we wouldn't have a functioning Armed Forces at all. It's not a lack of compassion, it's just a different focus, a different values set.

    The mandate for action in Libya as set out by the UN is pretty clear. We are operating a no-fly zone to protect civilians. That's all our Armed Forces are doing. Don't mistake the actions of the Government and FCO [the handing out or surplus kit to the rebels] with the actions of the RAF who are doing their best considering they've got sod-all equipment at the moment.
    Libya-wise its just amazing how suddenly this one country we have to do everything to protect civilians whilst in so many other conflicts we couldn't care less (The congo comes to mind, something we could have made a huge impact to without even fighting).

    As I've said before its not the deaths of civilians that, ultimately, I find problematic (as horrible and unnecessary as they are). Its the callousness with which (again, mostly the Americans) treat civilian casualties. When seemingly massive numbers of civilian deaths are 'ok' as long as one or two suspected enemy combatants are killed too you know there's something wrong. This isn't a new thing though and I suppose I shouldn't be surprised but you know, its nice to think the USA might actually change one day.

    Bloody hell, was it 2007 British forces left? It seems like it was last year :beard:.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I can't believe you'd base your decision of university on this.

    Just go on to that Uniform dating website and arrange some dates with soldiers or something.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    join the navy.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mithra)
    Libya-wise its just amazing how suddenly this one country we have to do everything to protect civilians whilst in so many other conflicts we couldn't care less (The congo comes to mind, something we could have made a huge impact to without even fighting).

    As I've said before its not the deaths of civilians that, ultimately, I find problematic (as horrible and unnecessary as they are). Its the callousness with which (again, mostly the Americans) treat civilian casualties. When seemingly massive numbers of civilian deaths are 'ok' as long as one or two suspected enemy combatants are killed too you know there's something wrong. This isn't a new thing though and I suppose I shouldn't be surprised but you know, its nice to think the USA might actually change one day.

    Bloody hell, was it 2007 British forces left? It seems like it was last year :beard:.
    I agree, the hypocrisy is insane. One could almost be cynical enough to suggest it's a cunning ploy to attempt to get people to 'forget' about the troubles at home....

    Perfectly valid reasons, but again, completely unnecessary to lump in potential recruits to the British Armed Forces with a stereotype of another country's forces.

    It was 2007 when the vast majority of forces left and ended their combat operations. Some remained for a while to train Iraqi forces, some stayed on in a UN capacity, but those numbers are minute [<20] so to all intents and purposes, the Forces are no longer there.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Sandhurst?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Go to the best university you can get into for the cause you want to do.
    If you care so much about army guys, join the ARMY. Generally most of them tend to be there, weirdly.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    University of Kabul.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JamesBlood)
    University of Kabul.
    Hardly any British troops in Kabul Province

    In any case OP, being a military wife is torture.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ich Dien)
    Hardly any British troops in Kabul Province

    In any case OP, being a military wife is torture.
    Nationality wasn't specified.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rzc)
    Anywhere near Colchester if you want Paras

    Portsmouth Plymouth for Marines
    Corrected.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Clip)
    Corrected.
    My bad. That's the HQ.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Drewski)
    This really deserved being put in the Armed Forces [careers] forum?

    Well done OP, new levels of idiocy.



    Hi, engineering graduate and [former] military officer, screw you and have a nice day
    Destroyed
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

Articles:

Guide to the armed forcesGuide to the Royal Air ForceA job in the Army

Featured recruiter profiles:

Army logo

The Army is recruiting now

"With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

Quick Link:

Unanswered Armed Forces Threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.