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    (Original post by infernalcradle)
    extra curriculars
    Thanks you
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    (Original post by unknown demon)
    Yes why is this so hard to believe.

    Last year a good friend of mine was interning at Goldman from London Met.

    Every year several people from non-target universities break into top banks either through contacts, referrals or having very good applications i.e. top grades, good work experience and extra-curriculars.

    The people who BADLY want the internships/grad offers and go the extra mile tend to get there in the end.
    I'm not trying to be rude, but from what everyone says on tsr, they keep putting me down .... so my expectations have fallen, but this gives me some hope

    Wsa it paid internship?

    And is it mainly 7 people or is that a rough estimate ?


    Because Im in A2 and have already applied for a banking and finance internship recently, just waiting to hear from them..... plus did work experience at barlcays hq , hopefully which is good.

    Would getting a 2:! at QMUL be any good , or would i have to push for a 1st? As i have heard its quite hard :/
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    .....
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    There's any number of stories about how someone from a poor uni bucked the trend and landed a dream job. Sure, it happens, but I certainly wouldn't count on it.

    In my opinion, the best thing you can do when coming from a non-target is to get a 1st and do a relevant masters at a top business school. Then it's down to you and the brand name of your uni won't be holding you back.
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    (Original post by logain2006)
    Do you sleep in a box like the actual character from Profit?
    Dont get much sleep, too busy doing yo momma :lol:
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    (Original post by Zweihander)
    Likelihood is it was back office. University bias doesnt apply so much to middle and back office positions, pretty much "anyone" with a respectable degree can get a back office job.
    Stop thinking that Back office is rubbish.
    It might not be the best roles but appreciate someone's efforts and being an arrogant wannabe FO douche intruding into every IB thread like a know it all.
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    Grades being equal LSE social work would top Aston Finance for general FO.

    Read the plethora of threads on this.
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    Ch engineering at ICL is way better than UCL
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    If you are really motivated and driven towards a FO role, it is easily achievable even from a non target uni. I know of at least 3 people from non targets who have grad roles within FO. One even has 300 ucas points and the subjects he did would be what people would class as 'inferior'. If you are really motivated and show a passion for the markets you will achieve a FO role, regardless of what uni you are from. Forget about reading all the **** on here saying how little chance you have if you go to a non target.
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    (Original post by Txi)
    Ch engineering at ICL is way better than UCL
    why? (apart from its higher in the league tables)

    thanks
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    (Original post by CityTrader)
    Trading, is a serious burn out career, it is very high pressure, high anxiety and is hard graft..... People think it is lavish lifestyle when truly your in the office at 6 and can leave at 10! many people do trading till they hit there 40s ect....so someone pulling out early is no real news......................... you could say how many went to oxbrige tries to get into IB and failed? i bet alot of people.
    I don't really agree with it being a 'serious burn out career' though that is my opinion. In a London IB (if you are trading the European markets and on a cash trading desk, or are an equity salesperson) then you may get in at 6am. The latest I saw a trader on a cash desk was 6. On an inflation trading desk it was more like 8.30. Never 10.

    For myself - I come in at 8am and leave at 6pm. I don't agree with the high pressure/high anxiety thing either - that just depends on what positions you take and leave with overnight; it is something you get used to.

    As for 'lavish lifestyle' - this depends on how you wish to spend your money. When I come into work, I still dress in the same clothes I used to wear whilst at university - I see no benefit in wearing a suit. I wouldn't call my lifestyle 'lavish' in the slightest. I could make it that way, but then I wouldn't be saving very much.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    I don't really agree with it being a 'serious burn out career' though that is my opinion. In a London IB (if you are trading the European markets and on a cash trading desk, or are an equity salesperson) then you may get in at 6am. The latest I saw a trader on a cash desk was 6. On an inflation trading desk it was more like 8.30. Never 10.

    For myself - I come in at 8am and leave at 6pm. I don't agree with the high pressure/high anxiety thing either - that just depends on what positions you take and leave with overnight; it is something you get used to.

    As for 'lavish lifestyle' - this depends on how you wish to spend your money. When I come into work, I still dress in the same clothes I used to wear whilst at university - I see no benefit in wearing a suit. I wouldn't call my lifestyle 'lavish' in the slightest. I could make it that way, but then I wouldn't be saving very much.
    Did you even go to university? How come you are a trader at 20? Do you work for the trading firms who require you to undergo a training course and then hire you?
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    (Original post by effofex)
    I don't really agree with it being a 'serious burn out career' though that is my opinion. In a London IB (if you are trading the European markets and on a cash trading desk, or are an equity salesperson) then you may get in at 6am. The latest I saw a trader on a cash desk was 6. On an inflation trading desk it was more like 8.30. Never 10.

    For myself - I come in at 8am and leave at 6pm. I don't agree with the high pressure/high anxiety thing either - that just depends on what positions you take and leave with overnight; it is something you get used to.

    As for 'lavish lifestyle' - this depends on how you wish to spend your money. When I come into work, I still dress in the same clothes I used to wear whilst at university - I see no benefit in wearing a suit. I wouldn't call my lifestyle 'lavish' in the slightest. I could make it that way, but then I wouldn't be saving very much.
    Fair enough, But would you agree if you are a trader at an IB, you don't get the flexibility as someone working at a prop shop?
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    No you just need to be a greedy, amoral, ****.
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    Did you even go to university? How come you are a trader at 20? Do you work for the trading firms who require you to undergo a training course and then hire you?
    I am 21 (profile says 20 since I changed my D.o.B.). I went to Imperial. I graduated last year. I work for a prop firm - their recruitment process is similar to IBs although more emphasis is placed on numerical/technical proficiency. I am off today since it is Good Friday.

    I have only worked on an IB's trading floor as an intern - though I still disagree with it being a 'high pressure, serious burnout' career, especially for a new starter since they do not actually trade until say, 6 months after joining. I can think of substantially more stressful careers.
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    (Original post by CityTrader)
    Fair enough, But would you agree if you are a trader at an IB, you don't get the flexibility as someone working at a prop shop?
    Well, they tend to start trading quite a bit later than at a prop. There is usually more of a hierarchy (they have titles like 'intern, analyst, associate, VP, ED, MD' but at props things are usually more fluid). IB trading recruits also tend to spend more time in 'training'. There is not the same flexibility in dress code, though if you become senior enough at an IB you are probably unlikely to be pulled up on dressing-down. From my brief experience, investment bankers tended to pay more attention to dress codes and formality.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    Well, they tend to start trading quite a bit later than at a prop. There is usually more of a hierarchy (they have titles like 'intern, analyst, associate, VP, ED, MD' but at props things are usually more fluid). IB trading recruits also tend to spend more time in 'training'. There is not the same flexibility in dress code, though if you become senior enough at an IB you are probably unlikely to be pulled up on dressing-down. From my brief experience, investment bankers tended to pay more attention to dress codes and formality.
    what did you study at imperial?
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    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)
    what did you study at imperial?
    Biosciences.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    Well, they tend to start trading quite a bit later than at a prop. There is usually more of a hierarchy (they have titles like 'intern, analyst, associate, VP, ED, MD' but at props things are usually more fluid). IB trading recruits also tend to spend more time in 'training'. There is not the same flexibility in dress code, though if you become senior enough at an IB you are probably unlikely to be pulled up on dressing-down. From my brief experience, investment bankers tended to pay more attention to dress codes and formality.
    Out of interest, are prop shop's recruits just as dominated by the usual university graduates or is there a little more flexibility on what University you come from?

    Cheers.
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    (Original post by househouse)
    why? (apart from its higher in the league tables)

    thanks
    I attended UCL and the people I knew from Chem were not that great, not poor but not in the ICL league.

    ICL had always been know as the premier science specialist.
 
 
 
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