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    (Original post by renzo)
    based on what? page & park, gordon murray, NORD, gareth hoskins etc. I honestly can't name one sheffield based office.
    Based on the fact that you've made two false assumptions.

    1. Tutors at architecture schools only come from practices within the city of said architecture school (Sheffield actually has only one tutor who works in Sheffield to my recollection). You also underestimate the proximity of Manchester to Sheffield.

    2. Good tutors come from well-known practices. Some perhaps do, but the majority don't. In my experience, the best tutors are the ones who work full time at the school, not necessarily doing research. Then again, this depends how you want to define a 'good' tutor. Ones working in practice may offer more straight-forward, practical advice.
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    (Original post by Ex Death)
    Based on the fact that you've made two false assumptions.

    1. Tutors at architecture schools only come from practices within the city of said architecture school (Sheffield actually has only one tutor who works in Sheffield to my recollection). You also underestimate the proximity of Manchester to Sheffield.

    2. Good tutors come from well-known practices. Some perhaps do, but the majority don't. In my experience, the best tutors are the ones who work full time at the school, not necessarily doing research. Then again, this depends how you want to define a 'good' tutor. Ones working in practice may offer more straight-forward, practical advice.
    well I don't know about the specifics of sheffield tutors but it seems logical to me that the best architects work at the practices that do the best work, and in that respect Glasgow is second only to London in the UK. Also studying under these guys allows you to build contacts making it easier to get jobs and internships later on, it would explain the relatively high employment rate of gsa and strathclyde.

    I think most architecture students would agree that the best tutors (not lecturers) come from practice, as you said their advice is more practical and results oriented. Tutors are so important when it comes to your development, they can really influence the long term direction of your work. I read an interview with Amanda Levete recently where she spoke about how she would walk out of libeskinds lectures at the aa because she rarely understood them and they didn't seem relevant to her, she said how libeskind and others at the aa didn't seem interested in building as it meant too much compromise. For me this is the key issue with full time tutors, they tend to be more focussed on interesting drawings and ideas than whether what you've designed is actually feasible. While its fun to design like this its not going to turn you into a very employable architect, thus I'd go to the uni (in this case the gsa) with the best links to good practices, as their architects are more concerned with the realities of construction but are still able to teach good design.
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    (Original post by renzo)
    well I don't know about the specifics of sheffield tutors but it seems logical to me that the best architects work at the practices that do the best work
    The most well known practices do the most expensive work, by no means the best. Again, we would need to define the semantics of the word 'best'. Personally I wouldn't call one of Zaha's minions a good architect because he happened to be fortunate enough to design a few blobs during his career (though this isn't to say that he would likely be a bad architect - I hope you can see my point).

    I think most architecture students would agree that the best tutors (not lecturers) come from practice, as you said their advice is more practical and results oriented.
    Depends on the project brief and the school's style. If your project involves lots of rhetoric, pseudo philosophy, BS etc. then I would argue that a more 'academic' tutor would be better suited than one from practice. They'll most likely push you in a particular direction to do well in the project rather than a tutor from practice who may not understand it properly. A tutor from practice would certainly offer better advice for your future as a professional in the industry, no question.

    In the case of GSA you'll probably find that tutors working in practice would probably offer better advice because of the style of projects they do. This is slightly less the case with Sheffield.
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    this is tricky. i went to shef. i have a friend from there that moved to GSA for part 2. i think he found it frustrating how practical it was after sheffield where you got to develop your own briefs and 'take risks'

    on the other hand FREE vs 9 grand. maybe you should do undergrad in scotland and move to sheffield for part 2 if you can. ...

    you're right to be considering money.
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    (Original post by Ex Death)
    The most well known practices do the most expensive work, by no means the best. Again, we would need to define the semantics of the word 'best'. Personally I wouldn't call one of Zaha's minions a good architect because he happened to be fortunate enough to design a few blobs during his career (though this isn't to say that he would likely be a bad architect - I hope you can see my point).



    Depends on the project brief and the school's style. If your project involves lots of rhetoric, pseudo philosophy, BS etc. then I would argue that a more 'academic' tutor would be better suited than one from practice. They'll most likely push you in a particular direction to do well in the project rather than a tutor from practice who may not understand it properly. A tutor from practice would certainly offer better advice for your future as a professional in the industry, no question.

    In the case of GSA you'll probably find that tutors working in practice would probably offer better advice because of the style of projects they do. This is slightly less the case with Sheffield.
    I said best work, not most expensive work, also I was sort of assuming the conversation was looking beyond 'starchitects', page and park for example do work on what I would consider relatively average budgets, as well as some really good restoration work. Well I suppose it's fairly subjective, but awards, the opinion of architects and your own analysis would determine that. Also for the record I've got some mixed opinions regarding Zaha Hadid's work.

    Looking at feedback from practices in recent times and the general consensus seems to be that architecture schools are far too light on the technical side of the education, so I'd always advise people to opt for a more practical course. The 'arty' side of design can be self learnt to a degree through research and intropsection, however unless your project submission requirements call for technical understanding it's pretty unlikely that many students would take the time to really learn about structure, environmental strategies, building regs. etc.
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    At the MAC at certain points in each design studio project you have technical hand ins like a detail or a structures report Etc and unless it gets passed you aren't allowed to continue on with the project until it's resolved. Means you are forced to make technical decisions and work through problems from the start of all projects instead of handing all that stuff in at the end and being able to tack alot of it on. It also makes it harder to change designs and make radial moves later on in project which is good in some ways but also very rigid. I was having to think about technical stuff far far earlier than I had to before and to a greater depth at that point. It depends on the student and the work you want to do, for me the work was right up my street whereas the more arty side of architectural education isn't.
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    What about cheap work? Can architects who you're never likely to hear of who work with very modest budgets ever be classified as 'good architects'?
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    GSA!!!
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    I studied at Sheffield university
    you moved to Westminster though?if you don't mind my asking, why did you change to another course?
 
 
 

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