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Difference between honours degrees and regular degrees? watch

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    Done a little reading into it and apparently the reason Scottish degrees are a year longer is because at the end, you graduate with an honours degree whereas in the UK you just get a regular degree?

    So what really is the difference? Is there any significant benefit to doing it? Or would I be better served getting the degree done in 3 years and then moving on to a masters?
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    (Original post by bob247)
    Done a little reading into it and apparently the reason Scottish degrees are a year longer is because at the end, you graduate with an honours degree whereas in the UK you just get a regular degree?

    So what really is the difference? Is there any significant benefit to doing it? Or would I be better served getting the degree done in 3 years and then moving on to a masters?
    You do realise Scotland is in the UK. I think you mean, "whereas in the rest of the UK..."
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    (Original post by bob247)
    Done a little reading into it and apparently the reason Scottish degrees are a year longer is because at the end, you graduate with an honours degree whereas in the UK you just get a regular degree?
    In England and Wales, most degrees are awarded with honours - First Class, 2:1, 2:2, even a third class degree is an honours degree. Very few people leave with ordinary degrees as your performance has to be pretty bad not to even scrape a third class honours degree.
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    (Original post by bob247)
    Done a little reading into it
    Do a little more reading, old chap.

    :lol:

    An honours can be obtained with most degrees, anywhere in the UK. As long as you don't majorly **** up. Obviously the level/classification is vital.
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    An honours degree is simply a degree which has satisfied prerequisites such that they are awarded a third or above. A non-honours degree is anything below this that is still a pass, an ordinary pass.
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    (Original post by The_Male_Melons)
    You do realise Scotland is in the UK. I think you mean, "whereas in the rest of the UK..."


    :rolleyes:

    I obviously meant that...

    (Original post by Bektas)
    Do a little more reading, old chap.

    :lol:

    An honours can be obtained with most degrees, anywhere in the UK. As long as you don't majorly **** up. Obviously the level/classification is vital.

    So why do the Scottish feel the need to add on an extra year to the course?
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    (Original post by bob247)
    So why do the Scottish feel the need to add on an extra year to the course?
    Courses in Scotland have traditionally been 4 years because the degrees have a broader focus in the first and second years - more like the 4 year US university degree than the 3 year degrees in the rest of the UK. The extra year is also quite useful to get everyone on the same page when you have people coming in with a range of different high school level qualifications - Scottish Higher Grades, Advanced Higher grades, A-levels, IB etc.
 
 
 
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