URGENT! UCL MSc research methods in psychology or CITY MSc Health Psychology

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athenapapa
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Report Thread starter 9 years ago
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So i've been weighing the pros and cons of these courses and CAN NOT make my mind up! So would LOVE some input and opinions PLEASE! im so confused!! :confused:

I'm graduating from the University of Westminster with a BSc in Psychology this summer and have just received all of my offers from my MSc applications.

I am deciding between these two mainly and possibly UCL MSc health (waiting for a reply still)

UCL- MSc Research Methods in Psychology

pros- i love research methods
great uni
great reputation
good opportunities for further studies (PhD)

cons- not a career area.. unless going into academia...


CITY- MSc Health Psychology

pros- great tutors (met them at my interview- SOO nice)
i think i would fit in well
opportunity to become chartered psychologist
PhD opportunities too...

cons- smaller uni
less known
not ucl...

future options: im not sure whether i will be able to study further due to financial reasons after my MSc (esp with the prices going up!) so would want the possibility of finding work after my MSc to still be there...
a DPsych in Counselling (at City) or a DClinPsy at UCL....

what are you opinions?!! PLEASE HELP!! i need to accept offers in the next week or so!!!! AHHH

do you think i still have career opportunities after an msc in research methods?
what are you experiences?

ANY advice is greatly appreciated!!
thanks so much in advance
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*Elizabeth*
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Hiya.... (duplicate reply!)

HIGHLY recommend the UCL RM course!!! I completed it prior to my PhD. 50% of our group won funded PhDs (myself included), since graduating in 2006, I think most of us are now working in post doc research positions or in research units, whereas some are now clinical psychology trainees. Graduates from this course seem to have a VERY high success rate on getting onto funded PhDs, clinical psychology training, research assistant jobs etc etc which is not surprising given that the RM MSc at UCL is considerably more advanced than any other MSc in the UK (given level of work- unless this has recently changed!).

You will receive extensive training in both quantitative and qualitative methodology- most courses only specialise with quantitative stuff. We were also taught by some of the DClinPsych staff for the clinical psychology modules. You could therefore obtain supervision from a DClinPsych staff at UCL- which may help for future DClinPsych applications- especially if you're thinking about applying to UCL. I learnt a great deal from this MSc- considerably more than my health psychology MSc and my current MSc in Clinical Applications in Psychology (although I'm only doing the PG Dip!).

I'm hoping to get onto clinical training one day- but I need to finish my PhD and gain some more clinical experience. Clinical experience is very very important for applying to the DClinPsych. I'm looking at stage 2 in health psychology at the moment (looking at the Doctorate in Health Psychology at City Uni)- virtually given up on clinical training (for now anyway!).

In terms of long term career stuff- health psychology is very new in comparision with more established fields (ie clinical psychology, counselling and research)), so health psychology jobs tend to be few and far between(for now anyway). I worked as a health psychology researcher at UCL last year and loved it!! With a near completed PhD, I'm looking at something more applied, or ideally a split post ie patient work and research work, which is why I'm looking at practitioner training in health and clinical psychology ie Doctorate in Health Psychology and the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. I probably need a little break from education , but I've combined my studies with work experience! (not quite an eternal student!)

If you have any questions, ask away- but I highly recommend the UCL course. I LOVED IT!!
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geeky_greeky
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(Original post by *Elizabeth*)
Hiya.... (duplicate reply!)

HIGHLY recommend the UCL RM course!!! I completed it prior to my PhD. 50% of our group won funded PhDs (myself included), since graduating in 2006, I think most of us are now working in post doc research positions or in research units, whereas some are now clinical psychology trainees. Graduates from this course seem to have a VERY high success rate on getting onto funded PhDs, clinical psychology training, research assistant jobs etc etc which is not surprising given that the RM MSc at UCL is considerably more advanced than any other MSc in the UK (given level of work- unless this has recently changed!).

You will receive extensive training in both quantitative and qualitative methodology- most courses only specialise with quantitative stuff. We were also taught by some of the DClinPsych staff for the clinical psychology modules. You could therefore obtain supervision from a DClinPsych staff at UCL- which may help for future DClinPsych applications- especially if you're thinking about applying to UCL. I learnt a great deal from this MSc- considerably more than my health psychology MSc and my current MSc in Clinical Applications in Psychology (although I'm only doing the PG Dip!).

I'm hoping to get onto clinical training one day- but I need to finish my PhD and gain some more clinical experience. Clinical experience is very very important for applying to the DClinPsych. I'm looking at stage 2 in health psychology at the moment (looking at the Doctorate in Health Psychology at City Uni)- virtually given up on clinical training (for now anyway!).

In terms of long term career stuff- health psychology is very new in comparision with more established fields (ie clinical psychology, counselling and research)), so health psychology jobs tend to be few and far between(for now anyway). I worked as a health psychology researcher at UCL last year and loved it!! With a near completed PhD, I'm looking at something more applied, or ideally a split post ie patient work and research work, which is why I'm looking at practitioner training in health and clinical psychology ie Doctorate in Health Psychology and the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. I probably need a little break from education , but I've combined my studies with work experience! (not quite an eternal student!)

If you have any questions, ask away- but I highly recommend the UCL course. I LOVED IT!!
Your posts about the MSc at UCL are so useful! There's very little by wway of reviews online.

Do you know how often part-timers had lectures/uni days? How many days did you do a week if you were full time?

Honestly any information on the course would be useful as you seem to be the only person who's done the course who is posting on here or elsewhere online.

Thanks!
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Interrobang
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(Original post by geeky_greeky)
Your posts about the MSc at UCL are so useful! There's very little by wway of reviews online.

Do you know how often part-timers had lectures/uni days? How many days did you do a week if you were full time?

Honestly any information on the course would be useful as you seem to be the only person who's done the course who is posting on here or elsewhere online.

Thanks!
She's not been online since 2013, so I doubt you'll get a reply
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