any1 know any theories on self concept in children

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alio
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exept frm piaget
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Blamps
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(Original post by alio)
exept frm piaget
The self concept is arguably developed from a very early age thru these stages:

imitation - children copy the interpersonal communication of adults in order to learn how to form roles"
role taking - children start experimenting with roles so as to try and work out how and when to adopt a certain role
Role taking symbolically - since an older child may know what to expect of a role, he/she can figure out when to use a certain role in a situation by a means of schema or "perceptual sets" and so can mentally picture what the features of a certain role are and whether these are compatible with the situation they are in

Also, consider how parents treat their children:
Are their actions respected?
Do they have clearly defined and reinforced boundaries?
Do parents make their child feel accepted?

You might also want to consider how the treatment of a child's parent may lead to the development of a self-fulfilling prophecy in the child that can be confirmed or diconfirmed by interpersonal resposnes of the parents.
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alio
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(Original post by Blamps)
The self concept is arguably developed from a very early age thru these stages:

imitation - children copy the interpersonal communication of adults in order to learn how to form roles"
role taking - children start experimenting with roles so as to try and work out how and when to adopt a certain role
Role taking symbolically - since an older child may know what to expect of a role, he/she can figure out when to use a certain role in a situation by a means of schema or "perceptual sets" and so can mentally picture what the features of a certain role are and whether these are compatible with the situation they are in

Also, consider how parents treat their children:
Are their actions respected?
Do they have clearly defined and reinforced boundaries?
Do parents make their child feel accepted?

You might also want to consider how the treatment of a child's parent may lead to the development of a self-fulfilling prophecy in the child that can be confirmed or diconfirmed by interpersonal resposnes of the parents.
wow thanx for that. wud it be relevent to the montemayor experiment though - 'who am i' if uve heard of it :confused:
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Blamps
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(Original post by alio)
wow thanx for that. wud it be relevent to the montemayor experiment though - 'who am i' if uve heard of it :confused:
could you explain it a bit? Is it a bit like freud with the identity, the ego and super-ego parts of the personality?
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Blamps
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(Original post by Blamps)
The self concept is arguably developed from a very early age thru these stages:

imitation - children copy the interpersonal communication of adults in order to learn how to form roles"
role taking - children start experimenting with roles so as to try and work out how and when to adopt a certain role
Role taking symbolically - since an older child may know what to expect of a role, he/she can figure out when to use a certain role in a situation by a means of schema or "perceptual sets" and so can mentally picture what the features of a certain role are and whether these are compatible with the situation they are in

Also, consider how parents treat their children:
Are their actions respected?
Do they have clearly defined and reinforced boundaries?
Do parents make their child feel accepted?

You might also want to consider how the treatment of a child's parent may lead to the development of a self-fulfilling prophecy in the child that can be confirmed or diconfirmed by interpersonal resposnes of the parents.
You could also use cooley's looking glass self i.e children look at the interpersonal behaviour of their parents when interacting with them and try to see how their parents perceive them - this may not necessarily be true due to other factors.

You could also use a bit of transactional analysis i.e what sort of "script" or "life-plan" may a child adopt at an early age and if this can be developed through receiving "strokes" - there are susposed to be two life plans, winners and losers
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alio
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(Original post by Blamps)
You could also use cooley's looking glass self i.e children look at the interpersonal behaviour of their parents when interacting with them and try to see how their parents perceive them - this may not necessarily be true due to other factors.

You could also use a bit of transactional analysis i.e what sort of "script" or "life-plan" may a child adopt at an early age and if this can be developed through receiving "strokes" - there are susposed to be two life plans, winners and losers
soz bout delay. the method is getting kids of different age groups to write statements under the heading who am i to see if the younger ones give a more physical description than the older ones.
piaget gave 3 stages of development which are applied to the different age groups.
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Blamps
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(Original post by alio)
soz bout delay. the method is getting kids of different age groups to write statements under the heading who am i to see if the younger ones give a more physical description than the older ones.
piaget gave 3 stages of development which are applied to the different age groups.
sorry, i am not really aware of those theories but I hope what I have written helps a tad
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alio
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(Original post by Blamps)
sorry, i am not really aware of those theories but I hope what I have written helps a tad
its ok thanx for ure advice. sum of it does help
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curryADD
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(Original post by Blamps)
You could also use cooley's looking glass self i.e children look at the interpersonal behaviour of their parents when interacting with them and try to see how their parents perceive them - this may not necessarily be true due to other factors.

You could also use a bit of transactional analysis i.e what sort of "script" or "life-plan" may a child adopt at an early age and if this can be developed through receiving "strokes" - there are susposed to be two life plans, winners and losers
im an underachiever, must be a loser.
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Danithestudent
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The Id, The Ego and the Super Ego by Sigmund Freud (pronunced Bill & Ted stylee)
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Danithestudent
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(Original post by Blamps)
You could also use cooley's looking glass self i.e children look at the interpersonal behaviour of their parents when interacting with them and try to see how their parents perceive them - this may not necessarily be true due to other factors.
First Blamps my boy sounds like you've been doing Communications Studies.
And secondly kids aren't applicable in the looking glass theory and where they are it's very loose because kids don't lose their super ego until they are about 10 or 11...due to this they have no empathetic skills or nature and can't imagine what others think of them, such as autistic people.
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