cook2011
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Hello,

This is my first post! I have found this forum by chance and I find it extremely helpful.
I am an international student, I have just completed my undergraduate studies (in business administrator) and now I am interested in attending a MSc in Real Estate. I appreciate if you can help me to select the better course for me.
Below is anything that I have found/thought until this moment:
Initially, I had decided to apply to these universities:
Reading University, as my firm choice
UCL in London
CASS in London
Heriot Watt in Edinburgh
Northumbria University in Newcastle upon Tyne
and Oxford Brookes University in Oxford, as my insurance.

I make this decision because I believe that, in the field of Real Estate, the University of Reading offers the best prospects for me, followed by UCL (mainly not for this course but for its reputation). However, I have visited UCL and I found that the facilities are below my expectations. That is the reason that I think not to apply to UCL.
In addition, CASS demands 25000pounds for the Real Estate program, a amount of money which seems excessive for what it offers.

It seems me also strange that in the relevant ranking list (the only list that I have found regarding only land and property management), UCL and CASS universities are not even mentioned!
Also, the ranking list doesn't mention Heriot Watt University.
Why is this happened? Are these universities inferior to others that are in the list, regarding the real estate field?

Furthermore, after finding the above list, I think to apply also to the Sheffield Hallam University and the University of West of England in Bristol, but I am worried about their low evaluation in general universities rankings.

1. What is your opinion in general?
2. Which of these universities are supposed to be superior to others (always keep in my mind that I am interested in the real estate sector)?
3. Do you believe that it is better to apply to Sheffield Hallam or UWE rather than Oxford Brookes, as my insurance?
4. Do you prefer Northumbria or Heriot Watt University?
5. Is it worth to pay 25000pounds for the CASS program (in the same time that the leading university demands 10000pounds less (MSc Real Estate in Reading)?
6. Is UCL so good that I have to ignore the facilities problem?

Thanks in advance for your answers

PS Sorry for my English but it is not my mother language. If you have problems in understanding sth tell me to explain.
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masterajb
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hey mate, generally, the three best in the UK for real estate would be Cambridge, Reading and Cass. I've applied and been accepted into UCL, Reading and Cass and will most likely go for Reading.

My opinion of the three mentioned is that UCL has a brilliant reputation, but the course seems newish and doesn't have a reputation itself and the content seems even undergraduate level. As you said, the facilities are not up to scratch and seems somewhat neglected from other UCL facilities. Reading's program is something not to be laughed at. It's the third best real estate centre in the world and number one in Europe so it's a big heavy weight. Not to mention, it is the oldest by some 20 odd years over MIT, Columbia, USC etc. Cass has great facilities but is tailored to more financial aspect of real estate. My ambition is development so i need the bricks and mortar focus and this is where Cass differentiates itself. They have been operating since the mid 80's as well so again, is quite well established.

As for question 3 and 4, I have no knowledge on those programs so couldn't give you a decent opinion. But 25,000 pounds is ridiculous for Cass, however last time i checked, it is only 17,000 pounds. Reading for me is 15,500 (since I'm an international student) and domestic students is 13,500. As for your final question, I'd be more focussed on Course Content. I find Reading extremely well rounded and a good mix of finance and more development course work and the last semester is dedicated to an industry challenge, international field trip (previously been to Istanbul, Madrid, Helsinki, Prague) and your dissertation. But in general, I think it is a much better course than Cass and far superior to UCL. My dad had visited Cass and the course director hadn't even mentioned UCL (did mention Reading, Cambridge and LSE although LSE's course is somewhat bogus as well) so maybe that's some indication.

At the end of the day, it should be about what you want to achieve and get out of the program. I personally found that UCL would look amazing on my CV, but I'd achieve and learn nothing (most of their content I learnt in undergrad studies). Hence why I think i'll choose Reading.
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cook2011
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Report Thread starter 8 years ago
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Hey!
Thank you for your answer. It is really helpful for me.
To start with, Cambridge offers a MPhil which I believe that it is mainly if you want to follow an academic career. It doesn't suits to me.
I am an EU citizen, but not from UK. This is the reason why I believe that I am an international student, but generally I pay the same fees as UK students.

You are right, CASS costs 17,000pounds (for EU citizens), but I think that it is still expensive compared with Reading (13,500) and its value/reputation. If the University of Reading reject me (maybe because I don't feel so strong in English), I may prefer to apply to other universities rather than the expensive CASS.

On the other hand, if I do not apply to CASS or UCL, the other universities that I have mentioned are less famous. And all of them seem similar to me. I can't make a list with my preferences.. I have constantly in my mind the question: Which of the universities* is more suitable for me in terms of its reputation and the value of the program?
(*Oxford Brookes, Heriot Watt, Northumbria, University of West of England, Sheffield Hallam University)

Anyway, I hope to be accepted into Reading and meet you also!

If you have something else to add, I am happy to listen!
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student_london
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Dude Reading's Real Estate department is first-class. If your aim is to get top notch teaching, then you should look no further and choose them. It's pretty well-known in the UK to say the least.
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cook2011
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Report Thread starter 8 years ago
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You are right, so Reading is going to be my first choice.
But I would like to apply also to other universities (list above) in order to have alternative choices, if Reading regects me. Which of the above universities do you believe that I ought to choose as my second, third etc choice? Thank you.
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masterajb
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I'd probably say Oxford Brookes only because a few firms (BNP, Grosvenor etc.) target both Reading and Oxford Brookes, although the latter is not a very good school overall. But as an international, I'd try your best with the UCL, Cass and Reading. All are well known in the UK and if you're planning to return to your home (where are you from?) you would most likely need some weight behind it and all three mentioned do that just fine
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yooask
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Hi ,
THis is my first ever post. I have applied to all the same uni's except Cass. This discussion has proved to be very useful and help clear my head out a bit. I was really confused between UCL/LSE and Reading . having a place in all. But i think Reading is turning out to be the strongest contender. Id like to pursue a career in development as well .UCL facilities werent that great , and the course tends to tilt too much on the planning end.The only dilemma is that it has a great reputation, one of the best planning schools, plus its based in London. LSE isnt known for its real estate course so it goes out..im planning on visiting Reading to help me decide. I need to make my mind up quick as Readings given me 4 weeks to decide
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cook2011
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masterajb I am from Greece. You are right, people generally knows the 3-4 well known universities*, but I believe that apart from the overall reputation, the structure of the course, facilities, yet the amount of money that the program demand, act an important role in the selection procedure. If I pay attention only to what people in my country say, I ought to apply to Real Estate program in LSE, but I may prefer to learn something from my master rather than just "buy" a name. This is the reason that I can't make up my mind.

yooask Looking my options again and again I decide to apply definitely to the university of Reading. I didn't like CASS in general (it is expensive and mainly financial), but I am thinking about UCL. UCL has a demanding application procedure (I have read that they conduct also an interview), but I can't decide if its real estate course worth my efforts. Searching the Web I have found that UCL is highly reputed for its engineering programs. In my opinion Lse program is not so good. Have you applied also to either of my seconds' choices (Oxford Brookes, Heriot Watt, Northumbria, University of West of England, Sheffield Hallam University)? What do you believe for these universities?

*mainly Oxford, Imperial, Cambridge, LSE. I doubt even for UCL.
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yooask
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Hi there ,
i agree with you ..its not worth buying a name!! the course content is very important..well i have applied and gotten into Oxford Brookes...but comparing it to Reading its not as well reputed but a good back up option . i applied to UCL only because ive heard great things about the planning school . I guess you really need to know what career aspiartions you hold. I want to get into development and hence UCL seemed promising, te only problem is that it only touches on the finance modules..well good luck and let me know how you get on
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siwan
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Guys,

I'am currently on the MSc programme at Reading University.

It has a leading reputation for real estate that is true, but dont think that by coming here you will secure employment, especially if your an international student. From my experience UK employers do not hire EU or International Students, from a cohort of 90 only 4 non domestic students have been offered a job with 3 required to do work in their home countries (Austria, China etc) and One is working in a research team because of the candidate's ability to speak a foreign language. But it may be good if you go back home! if your from Asia you may want to consider Singapore University.

The programme is quite expensive, Aberdeen does a similar programme at the rates there are quite cheap in comparison to others, dont forget that with CASS or Reading you'll be paying a premium to be close to London or in London in Cass's case and plus a litlle bit for the reputation. But taking nothing from the University, which is quite good and the department well recognized, you may find it difficult to find a job becasue you lack the "interpersonal skills" i.e. a codeword for not being a "preppy boy or girl" from a middle class family of English blood!

The programme is intensive with 60 hours required a week, so if you think its going to be a holiday think again, the programme is a conversion masters that allows candidates from other backgrounds to study real estate, it is not a masters per se, nevertheless the same kind of work is required.

My tip, if your going to come on to the course, i would suggest that you have good maths skills, and once accepted start reading immediately. on the course there is no time to take it easy. And make sure you do not apply to stay at Sherfield Hall : you'll feel like your in a old persons room!

Nevertheless, good luck
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2rull
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#11
Hi,
i also chose real estate to study next year but i need your advice concerning universities.
i hadn't applied any universities listed above before i visited here yet i just sent my request to Reading University but i dont know if they accept me because my grade might not be enough for them.If they respond soon , i ll definetely choose them but otherwise i have 3 choices
-Kingston University in London
-Greenwich University
-Salford University in Manchester.

Which one would you choose guys ?
What i care:
-Nice accomandation
-Social campus area
-Relatively good education

Any of you have an idea about these universities ?

Thanks in advance.
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888star1
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#12
Hi TSR folk,

This is my first post here but i have been a lurker for some time. I would like your thoughts on MSc courses in Real Estate.

I have just finished a combined MEng in Architectural Engineering, and want to follow a career in real estate (particularly the development sector). To do this i am going to complete an RICS accredited post grad course, and i am a bit torn as to which route to follow.

I have received an offer for:

MSc Urban Regeneration & Development from the University of Manchester. I was drawn to this course as it fulfills the planning & development route of the RICS, and is development focused.

However, after doing more research i noticed the MSc Real Estate at Reading (and similar courses) also have a somewhat development focus, and also has the obvious appeal of the reputation!

From people who have followed/researched a similar route; what would you be inclined to follow?

My aim would be to get a job with one of the big Real Estate companies in a development department. (ie Savils)

Cheers in advance,

Steve
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Losho
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Does anyone know what the difference in job opportunities are with a Real Estate MSc or a Real Estate Development MSc as I'm hoping to end up in real estate although I'm not sure if I should go for the development as it seems to cover a fair bit of what' studied in Real Estate MSc just more in-depth with development.

Any ideas?
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william12
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Hi All,

In respone to the above threads - I studied at Reading University for 4 years doing an undergraduate BSc in Real Estate (specialising in Planning & Development RICS surveying in my third year) and went on to study the MSc in Urban Planning & Development (specialising in RTPI planning).

Even though I am now working for a London consultancy as a planner (which specialises purely in planning and urban design) I am looking to jump back into Development Surveying to become dual qualified. There are many routes into development and so I suggest the following:

MSc Real Estate - although this will allow you to be eligible for all RICS pathways upon completion, its your best chance of getting on a commercial surveying graduate scheme and then depending upon your company, ask for your final rotation to be within a development or development and planning department. The best courses are Reading and CASS business school (hence the highest prices) however saying this, Oxford Brookes and Westminster are also highly regarding within London (although are arguably second tier). LSE is not regarded within surveying. Cambridge obviously has the name however is seen as too theory based and I have know colleagues study at undergrad in land economy then told to study a masters in Real Estate at Reading because it is seen as the market leader.

MSc in Planning and Development - this will normally allow you to be dual accredited by the RTPI and RICS (however only within the Planning and Development division). If development is your ultimate goal then this may be the more preferred route. Recently, more courses offer the dual qualification however the two areas of planning and d&p surveying are becoming more specialised and often regarded as two separate areas of expertise, making the opportunity to gain chartership in both extremely difficult. For example CBRE have there planning and development teams as two separate business lines (and split on two different graduate schemes), Cushman and Wakefield have moved there in-house planning team to CGMS (a pure planning consultancy) in 2011.

This is the dilemma I now have. Having now qualified as a planner and finished my APC to become MRTPI, to become MRICS in development surveying would mean swapping jobs and potentially re-training as a graduate in a real estate company (however I last studied development surveying at undergrad several years ago).

To put it simply, the MSc Real Estate and Development will also allow you to also become a planner - which would make you eligible to gain work in a local authority planning department (policy officer/development control officer), planning consultancy or as an in-house planner working for a developer (although this will be more strategic, trying to get land allocated for development within council's local plans or more of a project management role, where you might also be managing planning consultants to undertake the main work and submission of applications).

If you only want to stay within Development Surveying then the MSc Real Estate would help your chances, as it will allow you to also undertake rotations in broader RICS departments as well including property management, valuation, investment or agency through the commercial routes. Also, only a few consultancies offer the specialised D&P graduate pathway (Savills, Gerald Eve, GVA and BNP Paribas I believe).

I hope that helps. There is no right or wrong way in all this - just depends on what side of the coin you want to fall down on (i.e. planner and developer or just developer). This area is extremely popular and has the most competition at grad level. My other recommendation would be to get a year of experience in a smaller, local firm before hitting the big london firms - this will give you the extra edge in interviews and allow you to decide if development is still the area you want to specialise in. Remember, once your MRICS qualified, you can move around to any specialism relatively easily.

All the best,

W.
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william12
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Hi All,

In respone to the above threads - I studied at Reading University for 4 years doing an undergraduate BSc in Real Estate (specialising in Planning & Development RICS surveying in my third year) and went on to study the MSc in Urban Planning & Development (specialising in RTPI planning).

Even though I am now working for a London consultancy as a planner (which specialises purely in planning and urban design) I am looking to jump back into Development Surveying to become dual qualified. There are many routes into development and so I suggest the following:

MSc Real Estate - although this will allow you to be eligible for all RICS pathways upon completion, its your best chance of getting on a commercial surveying graduate scheme and then depending upon your company, ask for your final rotation to be within a development or development and planning department. The best courses are Reading and CASS business school (hence the highest prices) however saying this, Oxford Brookes and Westminster are also highly regarding within London (although are arguably second tier). LSE is not regarded within surveying. Cambridge obviously has the name however is seen as too theory based and I have know colleagues study at undergrad in land economy then told to study a masters in Real Estate at Reading because it is seen as the market leader.

MSc in Planning and Development - this will normally allow you to be dual accredited by the RTPI and RICS (however only within the Planning and Development division). If development is your ultimate goal then this may be the more preferred route. Recently, more courses offer the dual qualification however the two areas of planning and d&p surveying are becoming more specialised and often regarded as two separate areas of expertise, making the opportunity to gain chartership in both extremely difficult. For example CBRE have there planning and development teams as two separate business lines (and split on two different graduate schemes), Cushman and Wakefield have moved there in-house planning team to CGMS (a pure planning consultancy) in 2011.

This is the dilemma I now have. Having now qualified as a planner and finished my APC to become MRTPI, to become MRICS in development surveying would mean swapping jobs and potentially re-training as a graduate in a real estate company (however I last studied development surveying at undergrad several years ago).

To put it simply, the MSc Real Estate and Development will also allow you to also become a planner - which would make you eligible to gain work in a local authority planning department (policy officer/development control officer), planning consultancy or as an in-house planner working for a developer (although this will be more strategic, trying to get land allocated for development within council's local plans or more of a project management role, where you might also be managing planning consultants to undertake the main work and submission of applications).

If you only want to stay within Development Surveying then the MSc Real Estate would help your chances, as it will allow you to also undertake rotations in broader RICS departments as well including property management, valuation, investment or agency through the commercial routes. Also, only a few consultancies offer the specialised D&P graduate pathway (Savills, Gerald Eve, GVA and BNP Paribas I believe).

I hope that helps. There is no right or wrong way in all this - just depends on what side of the coin you want to fall down on (i.e. planner and developer or just developer). This area is extremely popular and has the most competition at grad level. My other recommendation would be to get a year of experience in a smaller, local firm before hitting the big london firms - this will give you the extra edge in interviews and allow you to decide if development is still the area you want to specialise in. Remember, once your MRICS qualified, you can move around to any specialism relatively easily.

All the best,

W.
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helloooo0
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hi i'm thinking of doing an Msc in real estate at london south bank uni, does anyone know how good this course is/how helpful in terms of getting a job at one of the big companies after (savills etc)? Have an undergrad in PPS from cambridge
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joeblogs
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UCL has just appointed one of the top real estate professors from reading university to teach the heavy financial stuff on the IREP program and is now offering a course that is very competitive indeed. When you combine the fact that you can pick modules from any department (such as investment management from the dept of MSI); the fact that the bartlett school of planning has been running for 100 years; and the fact that you can pick any modules from LSE or LBS, you have one of the best courses out there IMO.
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luca7780
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#18
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Hi All,

when you say MSc at Reading University, do you mean at Henley Business School or at College of Estate Management? They are both based there, but apparently are two different schools.

Thanks
Luca
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luca7780
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Hi All,

when you say MSc at Reading University, do you mean Henley Business School or College of Estate Management? they are both based at Reading, but are two different schools.

Thanks
Luca
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klsdoakj
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#20
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Belated reply I know, but (for info) the School of Real Estate & Planning at Reading University sits within the Henley Business School. The College of Estate Management is a separate organisation currently located on the University Campus which specialises in distance learning qualifications. Hope this helps.
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