What does it mean to be British or American? Watch

london_1
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It seems to me as though to be British or American you have to be white?

Height and Skin and other features are genetic, then why can people not accept people who are 'white' in all their ways except their colour?
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Bismarck
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(Original post by london_1)
It seems to me as though to be British or American you have to be white?

Height and Skin and other features are genetic, then why can people not accept people who are 'white' in all their ways except their colour?
Please don't generalize. It has been accepted for centuries that being American meant accepting the American ideals (e.g. individualism, anti-statism, democracy, city on a hill, etc.). Any other definition would be untenable seeing that nearly a third of Americans aren't white.
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fishx
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(Original post by london_1)
It seems to me as though to be British or American you have to be white?

Height and Skin and other features are genetic, then why can people not accept people who are 'white' in all their ways except their colour?

If you are born in Britian then you are British.
If you were born in America you are American.

Regardless of your colour you are of the nationality of the country you were born in.

Wouldn,t it be nice if the whole world was colour blind?
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Longshoredrift80
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Actually, my parents are Italian, despite being born and raised in Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia), studying in South Africa and having been living in Britain for the last 20 years. I'm British, but Italy have me down as a citizen too. Isn't nationality fun?
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scoobrildil
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(Original post by fishx)
If you are born in Britian then you are British.
If you were born in America you are American.

Regardless of your colour you are of the nationality of the country you were born in.

Wouldn,t it be nice if the whole world was colour blind?
yes, exactly
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la fille danse
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(Original post by Bismarck)
Please don't generalize. It has been accepted for centuries that being American meant accepting the American ideals (e.g. individualism, anti-statism, democracy, city on a hill, etc.). Any other definition would be untenable seeing that nearly a third of Americans aren't white.
So someone who accepts those ideals (individualism, etc.) but has never stepped foot in America is American?
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ChemistBoy
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Look at your passport, it tells you all you need to know.
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Beekeeper
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(Original post by morningtheft)
So someone who accepts those ideals (individualism, etc.) but has never stepped foot in America is American?
The question was "what does it mean to be American?"

Thats what being American means to Americans.
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la fille danse
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Oh well... that's interesting to know.
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thebucketwoman
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(Original post by london_1)
It seems to me as though to be British or American you have to be white?
No of course not. You're passport is all that matters, end of story.
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JonD
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(Original post by london_1)
It seems to me as though to be British or American you have to be white?

Height and Skin and other features are genetic, then why can people not accept people who are 'white' in all their ways except their colour?
America is probably different to Britain, but people here tend to refer to quite British members of minority groups as "Chinese", "Pakistani", "black", etc. Though that might just be a descriptor used the same way that "tall" or "blond" are also used, rather than acknowleding them as non-British foreigners.
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thebucketwoman
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(Original post by JonD)
America is probably different to Britain, but people here tend to refer to quite British members of minority groups as "Chinese", "Pakistani", "black", etc. Though that might just be a descriptor used the same way that "tall" or "blond" are also used, rather than acknowleding them as non-British foreigners.
Yes its the latter, I often refer to people as black, white, etc, I'm not making any statement about their nationality, which is only derived from asking not looking.
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JonD
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(Original post by thebucketwoman)
Yes its the latter, I often refer to people as black, white, etc, I'm not making any statement about their nationality, which is only derived from asking not looking.
It's a confused situation because majority group identity is surpressed. Most would accept the idea that, say, BBC newsreaders or the minority actors from the Bill are British. But when a group of people that are united by some foreign feature make demands of the majority, they are seen as foreigners. I think this is because a lot of people naturally associate themselves with groups and instinctively want to protect them. Because such feelings are taboo, I think many of these people have to divert their blame and anger towards organisations that aren't shy to show those feelings, like the BNP. I don't know what the psychological term would be, but I think it's the same way that some can be observed to bully others when they see in them an embarassing feature that reminds them of themselves.
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la fille danse
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(Original post by thebucketwoman)
No of course not. You're passport is all that matters, end of story.
Most Americans don't have passports. :P
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Higgy
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Being British means to accept this countries ideals,laws and to respect it to its full extent,people offer different views on what exaclty is British and American for that matter but on the whole both nations are generally classed as white ( even though 12 million americans are black) or something around that figure someone correct me if im wrong?
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Batazer
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Ethnically, being British means to have British ancestors and British heritage.

Political correctly, being British means anyone can be British regardless of their ancestry, heritage, colour of skin etc. But you must be a citizen here.
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Bismarck
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(Original post by Higgy)
Being British means to accept this countries ideals,laws and to respect it to its full extent,people offer different views on what exaclty is British and American for that matter but on the whole both nations are generally classed as white ( even though 12 million americans are black) or something around that figure someone correct me if im wrong?
35 million Americans are black, 40 million are Hispanic, 2 million are Native Americans, and 12 million are Asians. That's 90 million out of a total population of 300 million.
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ArthurOliver
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There's a legal definition, a separate cultural definition which is necessarily vague, and a sense of national identity. 3 different things.

The problem America has is that so many choose to consider themselves hyphenated-Americans. There are at least three ethno-nations sharing that legal-national tag. And two of them use the political process to advance their ethnic interests at the expense of the other.

There are very few nations which have as powerful and pervasive a sense of their national history as the African-Americans do, and there are few populations so deeply resentful, mistrusting and historically divided from another population with which they share a legal-national identity.

We're recreating America's unfortunate problems here.
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la fille danse
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Look at your passport, it tells you all you need to know.
What if you have more than one?

One of my friends has, I think, passports from three different countries and is eligible to get a couple more.
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lesser weevil
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If you were born in a pigsty, does that make you a pig?
Nationality confuses me. i was born in Ireland, so can call myself Irish if I want to (which I dont), but I am English, have a british passport, etc. etc.
so I dont know what makes you a nationality.
Now in Ireland they say a mother has to be living in the country for 3 years before having her child if it is to be called Irish.
so if that law had been in order when I was born - then I wouldn't be Irish.
What would that make me?
wahh I'm NOTHING!
but then, I'm English. So I'm confused, and that's cool
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