Is there a flaw in meritocracy? Watch

limetang
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Personally I agree with meritocracy, however a reason that is frequently given for it is the fact that everyone should be judged on their skills talents how hard they work etc. not on being born into success etc.

I suppose the issue I see in this is the fact that what is basically being said is that, being born lucky with regards to skills and talents and being rewarded for it is okay, however being born lucky with regards to hereditary (pardon my spelling) wealth and power and being rewarded for it is unacceptable.

Basically what I'm saying is. While I agree with meritocracy I can't see how it can be justified as objectively right.

Anyway I was wondering what your opinions on this were.

(And yes I will admit my reasons for asking this question are partly motivated by other threads about the relevence of the royal family etc.)
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rajandkwameali
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I agree with it in principle. Even still, I think difference is normal in life. People who complain about equality are weak, in general.
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Joinedup
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Yeah! The word 'meritocracy' was coined in a novel which was a social satire. you end up being ruled by people who are able to define merit, and they unsurprisingly define merit to mean 'like me and my children'
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2001/jun/29/comment
it turns into social nepotism *** feudalism with the added twist that those defined as having no merit are being told by the people on top that it's their own fault.
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Missreznor
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I'd love to believe that it works and exists but because of my own experiences with the system I just can't. I'm a talented artist, and wanted desperately to go to art college, however because of my background I couldn't go to my chosen college. Basically my college wouldn't allow me to study Religion and Art together so they sent me over to the college next door to study Art. I found that my grades plumeted, and the teacher who had very little knowledge of me laughed when I said I wanted to go to Falmouth. I dropped art at the end of year 12 and decided to go back to complete my alevel at my college once I'd finished, with the plan to go onto to do a foundation course. Once I got onto my foundation they told me that because of my age (19) I would have to fund my own course. Long story short, coming from a poor family this was very difficult and I ended up having to drop out, and so never got to go to the uni of my choice. How is that a metriocracy? I know other people who have had similiar problems with the education system. What sucks most about this concept is that so many people believe in it and then people (like me) are labelled lazy, told we just didn't try hard enough or made to feel it is our fault. It makes me angry just thinking about it.
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iamyourspiritfrombeyondth
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(Original post by Joinedup)
Yeah! The word 'meritocracy' was coined in a novel which was a social satire. you end up being ruled by people who are able to define merit, and they unsurprisingly define merit to mean 'like me and my children'
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2001/jun/29/comment
it turns into social nepotism *** feudalism with the added twist that those defined as having no merit are being told by the people on top that it's their own fault.
This. I always find it hilarious how many 'meritocrats' (if there is such a thing) haven't read that book.
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faber niger
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(Original post by limetang)
I suppose the issue I see in this is the fact that what is basically being said is that, being born lucky with regards to skills and talents and being rewarded for it is okay, however being born lucky with regards to hereditary (pardon my spelling) wealth and power and being rewarded for it is unacceptable.
But skills and talents tend to bring wealth and power so the distinction is meaningless.

It is unjust that folk should gain greater rewards as a result of factors outwith their control (be they environmental or biological, or a combination of the two), but the fact that they mostly do seems to be a necessary price that we pay for our level of productivity. And, of course, if there's anything that a cursory glance at the world should show, it's that there's little justice out there.

(Original post by Joinedup)
Yeah! The word 'meritocracy' was coined in a novel which was a social satire. you end up being ruled by people who are able to define merit, and they unsurprisingly define merit to mean 'like me and my children'
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2001/jun/29/comment
it turns into social nepotism *** feudalism with the added twist that those defined as having no merit are being told by the people on top that it's their own fault.
Good post, would rep it if I could. Looks like you don't need my donation thrown into your proverbial fountain anyway though.
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Serendipitous
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But skills and talents tend to bring wealth and power so the distinction is meaningless.

It is unjust that folk should gain greater rewards as a result of factors outwith their control (be they environmental or biological, or a combination of the two), but the fact that they mostly do seems to be a necessary price that we pay for our level of productivity. And, of course, if there's anything that a cursory glance at the world should show, it's that there's little justice out there.
I agree with a meritocracy. Obviously not one like the satirical result. The alternative to a meritocracy would have to be where people are not judged by their abilities, but in the sake of 'fairness' all allowed to do the same things. I don't think it's too harsh to say that not everybody can be a doctor or a rocket scientist.

An ideal meritocracy would be where everybody, regardless of background, could be given the same opportunities to succeed due to natural ability. It seems more unfair to prevent truly gifted people from succeeding than judge people on ability when appropriate.
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