Which element is the best reducing agent Watch

nasira372
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Flourine is the best oxidising agent because it has the highest electronegativity so it will reduce very easily.

My question is, what element is the best reducing agent. In other words, which element will get oxidised most easily? Also could you give for it like I did above
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Coke Or Pepsi
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(Original post by nasira372)
Flourine is the best oxidising agent because it has the highest electronegativity so it will reduce very easily.

My question is, what element is the best reducing agent. In other words, which element will get oxidised most easily? Also could you give for it like I did above
I believe it's Lithium - because of it's standard electrode potential. It's most negative so it's the most readily oxidised thus strongest reducing agent. Don't quote me though.
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torchwood
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(Original post by Coke Or Pepsi)
I believe it's Lithium - because of it's standard electrode potential. It's most negative so it's the most readily oxidised thus strongest reducing agent. Don't quote me though.
surely its lower down than lithium, more like francium. the unpaired electron of francium is significantly less attracted to its nucleus due to electron shielding by the inner sub-orbitals. this is why the first ionisation energy of francium is significantly lower than lithium
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BlindingLight
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Potassium because it the most reactive metal in the reactivity series? (I'm guessing here).
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nasira372
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(Original post by torchwood)
surely its lower down than lithium, more like francium. the unpaired electron of francium is significantly less attracted to its nucleus due to electron shielding by the inner sub-orbitals. this is why the first ionisation energy of francium is significantly lower than lithium
Lithium is right i'm afraid, I just needed a reason. If I stated in the original post what the answer was, then people would start guessing reasons and I wanted someone who knew what he was talking about to answer.

I would have thought Francium as well because if the best oxidising agent has the highest electronegativity, common sense says that the best reducing agent would have to be the one with the lowest electronegativity (francium) but this isnt the case
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Coke Or Pepsi
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You would think that it's the more reactive metals but its not. I'm not so sure why to be honest. It's to do with electrode potentials although logic would tell you more reactive metals will have more negative electrode potentials.
(Original post by Blackshadow)
Potassium because it the most reactive metal in the reactivity series? (I'm guessing here).

(Original post by torchwood)
surely its lower down than lithium, more like francium. the unpaired electron of francium is significantly less attracted to its nucleus due to electron shielding by the inner sub-orbitals. this is why the first ionisation energy of francium is significantly lower than lithium
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by nasira372)
I would have thought Francium as well because if the best oxidising agent has the highest electronegativity, common sense says that the best reducing agent would have to be the one with the lowest electronegativity (francium) but this isnt the case
After a quick look I can't even find a value for Francium, it might not even be known but here is a pretty decent table for reduction potentials: http://www.mrteverett.com/Chemistry/...Potentials.pdf

Common sense doesn't always help you in chemistry I'm afraid :p: the perhaps surprising result that Li is more powerful is not down to the isolated ion itself (ionisation energies in the gas phase would seem to say the opposite afterall) but can be attributed to hydration enthalpy associated with the high charge density of the Li+. The strongly attracted water molecules must be removed too in the process.
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