IB Music SL?? Watch

ap1550
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#1
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I'm taking the IB Music SL test in 5 days and our teacher has taught us absolutely nothing. We are 5 IB students grouped in an ensemble/class with 12 other non-IB students that can't really play their instruments at all, and our teacher literally gave us the textbook a few months ago and told us to read it. We haven't actually learned any material to prepare for this test besides what we got by reading ourselves from the book, SO I have a few questions about the listening portion of the test:

How long is each extract?

What is each response graded on (what are the 4 categories) and how long should each response be?

Is there a specific breakdown of the context of the works we have to analyze?

ANY information I can get about the listening portion of the test and what I should do to cram and prepare for it would be amazing. Thanks!
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Stellalovesny
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Hi!

Just saw this and wanted to give you all the help i could. I'm doing music HL so i'm not sure if your times are the same but here's the outline for mine:

Set Works (you don't have to do this section for SL)
25 mins on Mozart or Copland
25 mins on Comparison of the two

Art Music
25 mins on unheard art piece (with score)
25 mins on unheard art piece

World Music
25 mins on unheard world music piece
25 mins on unheard world music piece

then 25 mins on comparison between 2 of the 4 unheard pieces.

I reckon you probably only have to do the last 5 essays.
I'm sorry I couldn't have been of more help... just revise the book, making sure you know and can recognize music from each period of Art Music (i.e. Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque etc.) and also listen and revise some world music structures.

Remember to focus on structural, musical and contextual information and use a lot of music terminology for extra points!

Good luck!
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Stellalovesny
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I got this from another forum, I was very wrong for some parts haha. Hope this helps:

"The first 3 questions are on the set pieces, Mozart's Symphony No. 41 and Copland's El Salon Mexico. If you are HL, you'll answer all 3 questions. If you're SL, you will answer 1 OR 2, AND 3. (So if you're SL either 1 and 3 or 2 and 3.) Questions 1 and 2 are specifically about one of the pieces ex. How successful was Copland in mixing 20th century tone colors with traditional tone colors? Question 3 will be compare and contrast the two pieces with regard to certain aspects (rhythm, timbre, etc.)

Questions 4-7 are the pieces you listen to and analyze. They may be identified or unidentified- mostly they will be unidentified. There may or may not be a score for one or more of the pieces. If there IS a score, there is a specific aspect of the piece the examiners definitely want you to pick up on.
The questions will basically ask you to analyze what you hear. Talk about historical context, instrumentation, form, harmony, rhythm, timbre, all that good stuff.

If you're HL, Question 8 will ask you to compare and contrast two of the pieces from Questions 4-7 with regard to a specific musical link. If you're SL, you don't have to answer question 8. "
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iamjuliayesiam
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hello, I'm doing the standard music exam, and you have to write 1 essay on either the Mozart or Copland - on the exemplar paper given by the IBO it's something about how the pieces are written in the classical or 20th century style.

Then you have to write another essay comparing an element of both set works. So this could be on rhythms, timbre, structure, harmony etc...

Okay, then you have 4 (I think) pieces which are effectively 'unheard', you get them on a CD and you have to analyse them in terms of musical features (time sig, harmony, key, tone, instruments, any other musical terms like melisma or trills, phrasing etc. Make sure you give time references. You can take the track back, and you have overall control of it. You also have to talk about the structure. I find it easiest to write down A, B, C, A... whatever, and the time when this section is and what it includes. Then you can write points about context, so geography, period, when and why it would be played.

I usually write this section under those three headings in bullet points. No need to write an essay for part B. The examiners are just looking for valid points made.

Though I would recommend writing the set text section in an essay form making sure you relate to bar numbers or write out the rhythm - like a quote in an English exam.

Good luck I'm sure you'll so wonderfully.
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