Which universities, if any, will be forced to close next year? Watch

daemongreen
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I reckon there will be some universities due to:

1) people will be put off going to uni.
2) the people who won't will not want to go to lower universities
3) the universites/ or many departments in them will close if there aren't enough students.

This is further reinforced by the fact that pretty much every university will be charging full fees.

What universities do you think will be affected the worst?
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NapoleonDynamite
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London Met. And no, this isn't just typical "TSR Hatred" towards London Met, theyve already had to slash a load of degrees and cut loads of funds. I wouldn't be surprised if they closed
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cvqw1278
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I think many smaller Universities will be set to merge with other similar unis, maybe Thams Valley and London Met? I'm really not sure, I don't even know these two uni's geography in London if it would be possible for a merge, but I think that is what will end up happening.
There are plenty of unis I'm Liverpool that could merge, e.g. Liverpool Hope and Edge Hill.
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SchadenfreudeDude
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I think London Met might be in some trouble.

That's the only one I can think of, really.
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No Future
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St Andrews because it has run out of unmarried princes

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Iorek
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At least 70% of all post-92 unis that.... probably all those in London would be a good start.
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SpiritedAway
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At the moment it's hard to say. I mean even the "lower unis" will still get students. I mean, I didn't know about league tables or what an ex-poly was until I started using TSR, so a lot of schools won't pass on the message (especially if like our schools they have connections with the lower unis and so try and get their students in there).

I mean, until it happens, we don't know if it will actually put people off. People have said it will put them off, but did they just say that out of anger, or will it actually? We don't know if people will be far more reluctant to move away for uni, or decide to save cash and live at home, which might actually reduce the amount of unis that are open to them.

I think overall though, it will be interesting to see what happens. Especially in regards to whether or not certain subjects or unis will be affected. Especially as people are saying that it'll be the "micky mouse" subjects that suffer. I'm sceptical about this and believe it'll be subjects like languages and physics, since these aren't amazingly popular courses already.
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michael clayton
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(Original post by NapoleonDynamite)
London Met. And no, this isn't just typical "TSR Hatred" towards London Met, theyve already had to slash a load of degrees and cut loads of funds. I wouldn't be surprised if they closed
I doubt they will close- all the degrees they've slashed are the ones that weren't attracting enough applicants. Last year they had 400+ courses and now that number has gone down to 100ish.
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James1977
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(Original post by Iorek)
At least 70% of all post-92 unis that....
Can I ask how you have come up with that figure?

Was it pulled out of your backside to lie alongside your obvious bias?

...probably all those in London would be a good start.
Anyhoo, back to the question.

Whilst I think it is pretty obvious that there will be some measure of belt-tightening (across all universities, not just post-92s) I believe few, if any, will 'close'.

With regards post-92s, some may merge with others (as has happened since '92 in the 'good times') and some will trim back the courses they provide but there remains a requirement for some of the courses provided. This is especially true of many of the vocational courses.

Now whether some vocational courses should be run by universities rather than technical colleges etc is a topic that would fill a thread on its own. What is certain though is post-92s are unlikely to choose to give up their university status and the government is unlikely to enforce a change because of the budgetry impact such a change would have with regards educational estabilishment funding.
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infernalcradle
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I'd say loads of the lower unis (I'm talking sub top 60) will start having problems as people realise that paying 9k for a degree which has less value than the paper it is printed on is useless

I predict many unis will either merge with their more prestigious counterparts (eg. soton and soton solent, notts and notts trent etc) or in the case of places such as london met....just close down as no-one wants to merge with it and as its already up **** creek without a paddle

a lot of unis (such as oxford brooks) are also giving out degrees to students who do one of their courses in a HE college....although I personally am not too crazy about that idea
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Enoch.
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None.
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D.R.E
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(Original post by ussumane)
None.
Basically this. I don't expect any to close, but most of the less established universities will definitely have to massively streamline their operations.

London Met. (since everyone is talking about them) recently announced that they are cutting hundreds of courses, and are left with something like 82. I think we'll be seeing a lot more universities deciding to specialise in certain areas where they feel they give the consumer the best service and have a good reputation for.

And of course, you will also see some of them merging, after the specialisation and such.
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Aphotic Cosmos
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I don't really think any will close because the demand for courses is still growing, but I think that there will be a lot more co-operation and perhaps merging between universities to form much larger and more robust institutions. Perhaps Leicester, Loughborough and DMU to form a Leicestershire University, for example (don't think it will actually happen, just an example)
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maturestudy
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Once people have realised what the new tuitions fees actually mean I think there will continue to be demand for university places. Of course there may be university closures in the pipeline but mergers are more likely.

By not going to university you are severely restricting your choice of career. Many jobs that were previously had non-graduate entry are now exclusively open to those with a degree. In these hard economic times, where each vacancy receives many applications, employers are increasingly resorting to sifting candidates based on whether they have a degree. If you do manage to rise up the ranks of a company without a degree you may find it still has an impact when applying for other positions or if you want to work abroad, for example.

With the new system there's still nothing to pay upfront. You only start repaying when you are earning over £25k (e.g. approx. £75/mo when earning £35k). Go down to the job centre today and ask for people to work for £35k BUT they will have to pay an additional £75/mo in tax and you will have your arm bitten off!
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louholl
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(Original post by Thomas...)
I think many smaller Universities will be set to merge with other similar unis, maybe Thams Valley and London Met? I'm really not sure, I don't even know these two uni's geography in London if it would be possible for a merge, but I think that is what will end up happening.
There are plenty of unis I'm Liverpool that could merge, e.g. Liverpool Hope and Edge Hill.
edge hill and Liverpool wont merge...
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SchadenfreudeDude
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Yeah. I think mergers are far more feasible than closures.

Perhaps the universities of West and East London could merge to form the ultimate University of Middle London!
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James1977
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(Original post by infernalcradle)
I predict many unis will either merge with their more prestigious counterparts.........notts and notts trent etc.....
You are joking right? Nottingham Trent? Do you know anything about it as a university or is this 'random post-92 in a town with an RG' bingo?

When the reductions for certain universities budgets were announced during the last year of the previos government Trent was among them, but hardly blinked whn they were announced. The amount of international students they take alone would probably keep them afloat, let alone the amount of UK nationals they take in every year.

a lot of unis (such as oxford brooks) are also giving out degrees to students who do one of their courses in a HE college....although I personally am not too crazy about that idea
Universities having partnerships with colleges offering degree-level qualifications and awarding said university's degrees for sucessful completion is nothing new and not confined to post-92 universities.

For some of the older universities it is a means by which they can offer vocational degrees externally.
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MagicNMedicine
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None will close next year however quite a few are in trouble and could go over the next few years. UCU produced its own warning list late last year of the universities who were at risk from the impact of the Browne proposals:

http://www.ucu.org.uk/media/pdf/t/a/...risk_dec10.pdf

"Very high risk":
Bishop Grosseteste University College Lincoln
Edge Hill University
Newman University College
Norwich University College of the Arts

"High risk":
Bath Spa University
Buckinghamshire New University
Canterbury Christ Church University
Harper Adams University College
Leeds College of Music
Leeds Trinity University College
Liverpool Hope University
Roehampton University
Rose Bruford College
St Mary's University College, Twickenham
Staffordshire University
The Arts University College at Bournemouth
The University of Chichester
The University of Lincoln
The University of Winchester
The University of Wolverhampton
The University of Worcester
University College Birmingham
University College Falmouth
University College Plymouth St Mark and St John
University of Chester
University of Gloucestershire
York St John University

"High medium risk":
Birmingham City University
Central School of Speech and Drama
Conservatoire for Dance and Drama
De Montfort University
Leeds Metropolitan University
Liverpool John Moores University
London Metropolitan University
London South Bank University
Sheffield Hallam University
Southampton Solent University
The Manchester Metropolitan University
The Nottingham Trent University
The Open University
The University of Brighton
The University of Huddersfield
The University of Northampton
The University of Portsmouth
The University of Teesside
Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance
University for the Creative Arts
University of Cumbria
University of Derby
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therealOG
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(Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
I don't really think any will close because the demand for courses is still growing, but I think that there will be a lot more co-operation and perhaps merging between universities to form much larger and more robust institutions. Perhaps Leicester, Loughborough and DMU to form a Leicestershire University, for example (don't think it will actually happen, just an example)
Why would Loughborough need to change (and Leicester)? It's already got a very good reputation, and won't be hurt at all by the higher fees.
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infernalcradle
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(Original post by James1977)
You are joking right? Nottingham Trent? Do you know anything about it as a university or is this 'random post-92 in a town with an RG' bingo?

When the reductions for certain universities budgets were announced during the last year of the previos government Trent was among them, but hardly blinked whn they were announced. The amount of international students they take alone would probably keep them afloat, let alone the amount of UK nationals they take in every year.



Universities having partnerships with colleges offering degree-level qualifications and awarding said university's degrees for sucessful completion is nothing new and not confined to post-92 universities.

For some of the older universities it is a means by which they can offer vocational degrees externally.
trent was just an example, obviously if thats the state of their finances, they won't have to...but the point still stands that some will have to merge with their more prestigious counterparts....

I realise the partnerships are nothing new, but they will begin happening on a much larger scale by many institutions.....
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