How do you get to USA as a British Student? Watch

Explosive Casualty
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#1
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Hey, Im a British student, I have 10 GCSE's and the IB's [one more year] under my belt, and im interested in getting to the states for university.

Ive been told there is such thing as ''introductory courses'' - a 2 year program in which generally everyone takes to do core courses that have nothing to do with the Major you are doing.

Is there any way in skipping them? I am looking to do a bachelors degree in something science/technical related - still yet to choose the major - therefore i believe this 2 year thing is a waste of my time.

So anyone know?
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Teao the Cat
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#2
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It's general ed, and as far as I know, everyone must take them, although you go get a choice from a list sort of thing. Like, you must take one from the sciences group/languages group and so on.
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PorridgeMonster
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Pretty sure the introductory courses are done along side your main subject meaning you cant just not do them. I think i heard somewhere they are just maths and english/history so you need to have a high enough qualification in those 3 to even get a placement. However im not 100% on all of this so dont take my word.
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Explosive Casualty
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Hmm, are you saying that the introductory courses will not affect the number of years i will be in Uni?

For example, I was under the impression that the 2 years were added on [so if i was doing a regular bachelor degree, is 4+2 not just 4 years]
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bluesky42
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#5
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I think it's just one extra year. I'm guessing places like MIT would be more science focussed anyway so you'd have to do fewer humanities classes.
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Explosive Casualty
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Yeah, it the humanities like history or whatever i really dont need - especially US history - i mean i am a british scientist, i dont need all that >.>
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Teao the Cat
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(Original post by Explosive Casualty)
Hmm, are you saying that the introductory courses will not affect the number of years i will be in Uni?

For example, I was under the impression that the 2 years were added on [so if i was doing a regular bachelor degree, is 4+2 not just 4 years]
Nope. general ed is taken in the first year/ 2 years o your degree, and in the last two, you cencentrate on your major. It allows people to change major without having to start right from the beginning again: they can carry credits from general ed across.
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Explosive Casualty
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Does anyone know the courses i have to take? [the intro ones]
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Explosive Casualty
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#9
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(Original post by Hipster)
You sleep your way to the top with your charm and 'British/Briddish accent'.
LMAO yes, my fiance said everyone will jump at my british accent >.< Damn, and i was hoping to be low key!!
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neuro101
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(Original post by Explosive Casualty)
Hey, Im a British student, I have 10 GCSE's and the IB's [one more year] under my belt, and im interested in getting to the states for university.

Ive been told there is such thing as ''introductory courses'' - a 2 year program in which generally everyone takes to do core courses that have nothing to do with the Major you are doing.

Is there any way in skipping them? I am looking to do a bachelors degree in something science/technical related - still yet to choose the major - therefore i believe this 2 year thing is a waste of my time.

So anyone know?
I'm assuming you're talking about undergrad? 4 year institution: 2 year general ed, 2 year major courses. You don't have to do it that way (I didn't), but the university recommends it so you can focus more on your major courses. You can take major classes and general ed classes together. You can take major classes first, and then focus on general ed, which is what I did.

Your general ed classes are really based on what your major is. So I'm a science major, so all my GE's were social sciences/humanities/liberal arts. And if you're a Social science major, vice versa. I've heard a lot of European complain/dislike this system, but really taking so many classes just on your major can be overwhelming and exhausting, so having a little variety is a good balance.

You can skip them if you had already taken them at another institution, you can "petition" those courses.
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Explosive Casualty
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(Original post by neuro101)
I'm assuming you're talking about undergrad? 4 year institution: 2 year general ed, 2 year major courses. You don't have to do it that way (I didn't), but the university recommends it so you can focus more on your major courses. You can take major classes and general ed classes together. You can take major classes first, and then focus on general ed, which is what I did.

Your general ed classes are really based on what your major is. So I'm a science major, so all my GE's were social sciences/humanities/liberal arts. And if you're a Social science major, vice versa. I've heard a lot of European complain/dislike this system, but really taking so many classes just on your major can be overwhelming and exhausting, so having a little variety is a good balance.

You can skip them if you had already taken them at another institution, you can "petition" those courses.
After that Uni is done?
and 'petition'?

Hmm, i think the main reason why we complain is because of the misinterpretation, plus, like i said at the beginning - its viewed as a waste of time by most since were told they have nothing to do with the Major.

Thankyou =] that was a lot of help

Another question, is there any way on converting my GCSE and IB grades into an overall GPA? Ive tried looking around but none of the sources are very reliable or precise - many vary from source to source.
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Mad4footie
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#12
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No all universities are the same. Where i went, every one had to take the same gen eds, not based on your major. ( they're not introductory. they're just trying to give you an all rounded education so you take classes from different disciplines.) we all had to take a maths class, 2 sciences, 2 religions and a philosophy or 3 regions, a language, a social science, a global studies, PE fitness and wellness and skills PE(a sport). we had a wide range of classes to chose from, and we could take them whenever we wanted (not in the first two years). i mixed them in with the classes for my major. most unis will give you tranfer credits for your HLs and some for your SLs. so if for example you do bio HL you only have to do one science.

as to the conversion. i have no idea. you should ask the schools you are interested in applying to.
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neuro101
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(Original post by Explosive Casualty)
After that Uni is done?
and 'petition'?

Hmm, i think the main reason why we complain is because of the misinterpretation, plus, like i said at the beginning - its viewed as a waste of time by most since were told they have nothing to do with the Major.

Thankyou =] that was a lot of help

Another question, is there any way on converting my GCSE and IB grades into an overall GPA? Ive tried looking around but none of the sources are very reliable or precise - many vary from source to source.
Yup, 4 yrs and done. Yes, it can be a lot of material to take in. But it's not a waste of time, the universities here have the ideology that being a well-rounded student means being exposed to different material outside your specialty. So, there are reasonable intentions for why the system is set up the way it is.

So say for example you have taken classes at a community college (I don't know what they would be called in the UK, but they are not 4-year universities, you can only get an associate degree at CC), and you think that this course meets the requirements of another course, then you can "petition" it to count for that course.

Ok, that sounds confusing. Here is an example.

My university wants me to take "HUM101", but I have taken a similar course elsewhere, let's call it, "HUM123", and both of those HUM courses are similar in nature (i.e. topic). Then you can petition HUM123 to satisfy the requirement for HUM101. It's a really cool system, you can save A LOT of time by doing that, and in most cases, the university is very lenient about petitioning. So that's how you can get done with your GE's.

Also, another tip, want to get done with GE's quicker, take online classes. But that's a whole different topic.

Right. The sources vary because each university has a diff requirement. Check out collegeconfidential.com, which is like the American version of TSR. I did check for you, but there is not a "standard" website that can let you calculate your grades. The schools you are interested in will definitely help you in converting your grades. Good luck! : )
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Helena'sIMMORTAL
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#14
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There was a girl in my school who applied to a group of usa universities, they asked her to do their version of SATS as far as I know thoough if you are doing IB you just get in and can skip the first year of their unis as they work mostly on AP's which is point based like IB but IB is ,uch harder, however Alevel Im not to sure about. good luck
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S119234
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#15
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I myself intend to apply for American Universities. I'm a Scottish Student.

This website I've found incredibly helpful :
http://www.fulbright.co.uk/study-in-...tudy-in-the-us

I'm hoping to take the SAT tests, which are a requirement of most American Universities in October.

Though I must admit, I've been shocked at the level of forms you must fill out for your application. Be prepared to work long hours to decode them for the international system. Sure it'll be worth it though
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hummingbird28
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#16
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i think there are minimum credit points which you have to earn from a variety of subjects.rest assured, u can take extra classes of your choice ,depends from person to person. which will increase your workload .USA has some core as well as as optional units since beginning.
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