Which degree should I choose? Watch

anil10100
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Before I start, I know people are going to say choose the degree that you enjoy the most, but read on.

Basically, it's not long until I'm going to be applying to uni, but I'm still undecided as to what I want to do. I've always kinda wanted to do maths for no real reason, but recently I've realised I'm drastically better at sciences than maths. I think I enjoy maths marginally more but I realistically stand a far better chance getting into a good uni applying for a science. I gain interest and enjoy any subject that I put my mind to, but I also need to think in terms of career prospects. In my opinion, there's no point in doing a degree I enjoy if it's got absolutely no career prospects (waste of money). In short, I think I can get into a far better university applying for a science, than maths. But I enjoy maths marginally more, but I can quickly gain interest in pretty much anything after a while.
Sorry for this immensely shambolic ramble, but advice would be appreciated, cheers.
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kaylafrances
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(Original post by anil10100)
Before I start, I know people are going to say choose the degree that you enjoy the most, but read on.

Basically, it's not long until I'm going to be applying to uni, but I'm still undecided as to what I want to do. I've always kinda wanted to do maths for no real reason, but recently I've realised I'm drastically better at sciences than maths. I think I enjoy maths marginally more but I realistically stand a far better chance getting into a good uni applying for a science. I gain interest and enjoy any subject that I put my mind to, but I also need to think in terms of career prospects. In my opinion, there's no point in doing a degree I enjoy if it's got absolutely no career prospects (waste of money). In short, I think I can get into a far better university applying for a science, than maths. But I enjoy maths marginally more, but I can quickly gain interest in pretty much anything after a while.
Sorry for this immensely shambolic ramble, but advice would be appreciated, cheers.
the obvious answer is physics no?
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multiplexing-gamer
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Do Engineering, its a mixed of Maths and Science. (from what I've heard)
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nerimon18
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(Original post by anil10100)
Before I start, I know people are going to say choose the degree that you enjoy the most, but read on.

Basically, it's not long until I'm going to be applying to uni, but I'm still undecided as to what I want to do. I've always kinda wanted to do maths for no real reason, but recently I've realised I'm drastically better at sciences than maths. I think I enjoy maths marginally more but I realistically stand a far better chance getting into a good uni applying for a science. I gain interest and enjoy any subject that I put my mind to, but I also need to think in terms of career prospects. In my opinion, there's no point in doing a degree I enjoy if it's got absolutely no career prospects (waste of money). In short, I think I can get into a far better university applying for a science, than maths. But I enjoy maths marginally more, but I can quickly gain interest in pretty much anything after a while.
Sorry for this immensely shambolic ramble, but advice would be appreciated, cheers.

How about Computer Science? Or Astrophysics? They're quite maths-heavy sciences that you could possibly excel at. Or you could just pick a science (like Chemistry) and do it in combination with maths. My brother does that at UCL.
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I smell like maths
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it depends on your ability in maths tbh... if you honestly think you can do well in maths if you put your mind to it then do so....

otherwise take the science option or a mix of both?

you sound like a chemical engineer in the making

btw when did a maths or science degree have 'absolutely no career prospects'... lol?
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quantumgnomes
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Again , i'd say physics , biast as it's my favourite subject , but an interesting science with mathematical content. Much more at university as well.
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tobeconfirmed
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Maybe also consider combination courses, if you've got reasons for wanting to study both and are finding it hard to choose - maths and physics might suit you for example. I'm sure there are lots of other combinations too.

Edit: Others beat me to it.
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Zoombini
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joint honours?
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Harry.C
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Physakz. for the lulz.
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Theconomist
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The thing is.What do you want to do with your life?Any career plan?Wha'ts the point of signing up for a degree if its not a means to an end(career) which itself should be a mean to an end(life goal).
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physicsfuntimes
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I was in the same position a year ago, it was between engineering and physics and I went for physics because the courses tended to have a lot more obscure maths, whereas engineering tended to have 'more useful' maths...

But yay physics! Hopefully it won't let me down...
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anil10100
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Thanks for the help, out of the A Levels I do (Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Biology, Physics) I seem to find physics the one I achieve the least in, but has the potential to be the most interesting, (I achieve the least in this subject because I have the most unbelievably useless teachers that are yet to teach this year and a diabolical textbook for the course). In terms of career things, I know how typical this is, but I want a job that earns a LOT of money, but then again I'm sure everyone does. Finance is an area with professions like actuaries, investment bankers, stockbrokers etc. (I think) that are quite numerate things which seems to me, like the way forward in terms of career-wise. But then again I'm not hugely informed in careers. I actually enjoy biology and chemistry quite a lot a at the moment, but they seem more down to earth than physics which although I don't seem to enjoy too much right now sounds like it could get a lot more interesting, e.g I hate diffraction etc. but love quantum physics & space. And I'll probably be applying to Cambridge if that changes anything
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anil10100
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Looking into astrophysics looks seriously interesting & my kinda thing, but how are career prospects for finance after an astrophysics degree ?
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ThatOneGuy
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(Original post by multiplexing-gamer)
Do Engineering, its a mixed of Maths and Science. (from what I've heard)
What you heard is correct. My undergrad was in aerospace engineering and there was plenty of both calculus and science. I also did astrophysics (for my minor) and that had the same story only with the addition of quantum mechanics.

@anil10100
Study whatever you enjoy doing most. Your career prospects are going to be good regardless of what you choose.
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BigFudamental
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(Original post by anil10100)
Thanks for the help, out of the A Levels I do (Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Biology, Physics) I seem to find physics the one I achieve the least in, but has the potential to be the most interesting, (I achieve the least in this subject because I have the most unbelievably useless teachers that are yet to teach this year and a diabolical textbook for the course). In terms of career things, I know how typical this is, but I want a job that earns a LOT of money, but then again I'm sure everyone does. Finance is an area with professions like actuaries, investment bankers, stockbrokers etc. (I think) that are quite numerate things which seems to me, like the way forward in terms of career-wise. But then again I'm not hugely informed in careers. I actually enjoy biology and chemistry quite a lot a at the moment, but they seem more down to earth than physics which although I don't seem to enjoy too much right now sounds like it could get a lot more interesting, e.g I hate diffraction etc. but love quantum physics & space. And I'll probably be applying to Cambridge if that changes anything
Yea, doesn't sound like you should be doing physics. Basically you enjoy the sci-fi space stuff but hate the bread and butter stuff that underpins it. At Cambridge you do a whole term on diffraction in 2nd year (yes, it's really ****), and most of the labs you do are also in some way related to waves and diffraction (in 2nd year). Sounds like you're better off doing maths/biology/chemistry and reading a popular physics book.

In terms of finance careers I'd definitely recommend a quantitative course (maths), over a non-quantitative one (biology). Chemistry sits somewhere in the middle, depending on where you do it. At Cambridge you can make it pretty maths heavy if you so choose.

Astrophysics is as good for finance as anything else, but note that any astrophysics degree will require you to do a LOT of physics that isn't astro (yes, diffraction).
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anil10100
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(Original post by ThatOneGuy)
What you heard is correct. My undergrad was in aerospace engineering and there was plenty of both calculus and science. I also did astrophysics (for my minor) and that had the same story only with the addition of quantum mechanics.

@anil10100
Study whatever you enjoy doing most. Your career prospects are going to be good regardless of what you choose.
Oh okay, so your saying for a financial career I would not be disadvantaged for having astrophysics rather than economics or maths or something similar? Also, I always thought all engineering related degrees for specifically for engineers and not really relevant if you wanted to pursue any other profession?
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kaylafrances
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my chemistry teacher says that you can do anything with a chemistry degree so yeah it shows you're very intelligent and a very good career will come out of it
that most likely applies to physics based degrees and astrophysics etc
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anil10100
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(Original post by BigFudamental)
Yea, doesn't sound like you should be doing physics. Basically you enjoy the sci-fi space stuff but hate the bread and butter stuff that underpins it. At Cambridge you do a whole term on diffraction in 2nd year (yes, it's really ****), and most of the labs you do are also in some way related to waves and diffraction (in 2nd year). Sounds like you're better off doing maths/biology/chemistry and reading a popular physics book.

In terms of finance careers I'd definitely recommend a quantitative course (maths), over a non-quantitative one (biology). Chemistry sits somewhere in the middle, depending on where you do it. At Cambridge you can make it pretty maths heavy if you so choose.

Astrophysics is as good for finance as anything else, but note that any astrophysics degree will require you to do a LOT of physics that isn't astro (yes, diffraction).
Hence me wanting to do an astrophysics degree rather than a physics degree, having a look at it, astrophysics seems more to do with quantum physics, particle physics, cosmology, mechanics etc. with waves, electricity, and things that appeal less to me appearing to be the minority.
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BigFudamental
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(Original post by anil10100)
Hence me wanting to do an astrophysics degree rather than a physics degree, having a look at it, astrophysics seems more to do with quantum physics, particle physics, cosmology, mechanics etc. with waves, electricity, and things that appeal less to me appearing to be the minority.
Yea, but you're not going to get around doing those things even with astrophysics. The first two years are pretty similar whatever branch of physics you ultimately specialise in (ie mechanics, waves+optics, electromagnetism, quantum, thermo).
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ThatOneGuy
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(Original post by anil10100)
Oh okay, so your saying for a financial career I would not be disadvantaged for having astrophysics rather than economics or maths or something similar? Also, I always thought all engineering related degrees for specifically for engineers and not really relevant if you wanted to pursue any other profession?
Are you using finance as an example or is finance a field you want to end up in? An astrophysics degree will technically disadvantage you just because it's not a finance degree; however, it would not prevent you from moving into finance.

Engineering degrees teach complex problem solving and critical thinking. You can apply that to any profession.

Deciding your major can be difficult. I didn't finally decide what I wanted to do until I was filling out the application.
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