Intensive A level problem Watch

d.luffy
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Hi all,

As I got accepted in the sixth form college of oxford I thought of applying but there fee's are expensive.

So I looked over another country ( Switzerland ) and there private tutors are well qualified but for an hour of private lesson is around 65£ I mean come on this is expensive ! how can I pass Intensive A level as a private candidate and achieve at least an A if I only take 3 hours per week ( 1 hour each subject ) I won't be able to do that. I mean this is what I think personally, I want to hear from you guys if what I am saying is true or not as I am going to take A level for my first year so I have no clue how hard A level is or how time consuming it is. And if you advise me to go to the college or do it as a private student.

The advantage in Switzerland is I can work and earn at least 750£ per month I won't fund all the private tutoring but personally I find it expensive. But I want to know how many hours do I need to take per week as a Private candidate to achieve A's or if I am better off in the college.

Thanks
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username457532
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Or you could go to a state school. We're not that bad...
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PercyChatsworth
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What subjects are you thinking of? Self-studying maths is very straightforward as there is so much study / practice material available. Other subjects less so.
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d.luffy
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I am planning to take English Language French and sociology. I have never took sociology so it will be the first time.

I really want to take the best precautions to achieve an A as I want to enter one of the best universities in the world for Law.
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PercyChatsworth
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Avoid private study then.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by PercyChatsworth)
Avoid private study then.
I would need more accurate answers.
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UnbreakableDimmy
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With respect, English Language and Sociology are hardly the best choices if you want to enter a world-leading Law school. I'm not going to be dragged into a "soft subjects" debate because it's irrelevant; the fact remains that universities still perceive it that way, and you have to play their game.
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Alakamind
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(Original post by d.luffy)
I would need more accurate answers.
Either join a state school, or do the 3 hours per week and teach yourself. The 3 hours per week could be used to ask any problems you are facing at self-teaching.
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elitelight
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OP my advice would be to study economics history and french, in my experience the first two are straight foward if you want to self teach as there is sooo much material for it, with regards to a tutor you could simply study them privately and learn the content independently then get a tutor to mark your essays and give you pointers
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gdunne42
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(Original post by d.luffy)

I really want to take the best precautions to achieve an A as I want to enter one of the best universities in the world for Law.
I don't think you will achieve that with 3 hours of tutor supported study per week unless you already know the content from previous study and just need help to prepare for the style of exams.

A levels are designed to be taken by students age 16-19 in full time education over 2 years. Most students will start with 4 AS level subjects and then concentrate on 3 in the second year to complete 3 full A levels. Though many candidates successfully enter A levels privately, self study is not a easy option and trying to do it in one year would be very challenging.

It is possible to study intensively, especially if you already have good knowledge in the subject concerned, but what that really means is working twice as hard as a regular student so you cover the material twice as fast. My previous maths tutor estimated that you need 300-360 hours of study to prepare well for each full A level if you are learning from scratch.
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Lozza_00
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You should do different A Levels for Law and you need 4 AS levels.
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username457532
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It would be hard to self-study a language. Speaking and writing would be a huge issue. Unless you're a native speaker - in which case most unis won't accept an A Level in it.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by DeanFoley)
With respect, English Language and Sociology are hardly the best choices if you want to enter a world-leading Law school. I'm not going to be dragged into a "soft subjects" debate because it's irrelevant; the fact remains that universities still perceive it that way, and you have to play their game.
Well I do understand that, but I have been told the 3 subjects I chose are good, and as a Lawyer having a backup language is always good. and for english I don't know if they want that as A levels or no.


(Original post by Alakamind)
Either join a state school, or do the 3 hours per week and teach yourself. The 3 hours per week could be used to ask any problems you are facing at self-teaching.
No, I have already tried state schools for O levels and they are really not helpful.
Self study is not a wise thing to do espeically for me, I rather go on with the teacher with the syllabus then anything extra I could do it alone but not self study.


(Original post by elitelight)
OP my advice would be to study economics history and french, in my experience the first two are straight foward if you want to self teach as there is sooo much material for it, with regards to a tutor you could simply study them privately and learn the content independently then get a tutor to mark your essays and give you pointers
Self study is not what I want to do to be honest, but for the Law subjects I should take in A levels I still have no clue, but the thing is I had C in english in O level, and I want to take it again in A levels to show them I can achieve an A and that the C I had wouldn't affect me...



(Original post by gdunne42)
I don't think you will achieve that with 3 hours of tutor supported study per week unless you already know the content from previous study and just need help to prepare for the style of exams.

A levels are designed to be taken by students age 16-19 in full time education over 2 years. Most students will start with 4 AS level subjects and then concentrate on 3 in the second year to complete 3 full A levels. Though many candidates successfully enter A levels privately, self study is not a easy option and trying to do it in one year would be very challenging.

It is possible to study intensively, especially if you already have good knowledge in the subject concerned, but what that really means is working twice as hard as a regular student so you cover the material twice as fast. My previous maths tutor estimated that you need 300-360 hours of study to prepare well for each full A level if you are learning from scratch.
My point is not to self study but to bring a tutor to study with you the whole syllabus and self study in small occasions like revisions...etc, and no I have no clue about the contents, the only thing I know is that french in all cases won't take much of my time as I am a native speaker in that language, what I would be spending my time the most is with the 2 other subjects I am going to take, yes I am well aware that I will have to study way more then any students.

Thanks for letting me know 3 hours won't be enough in any cases, I am starting to think that I should really go to Oxford tutorial college that will give me far more then 3 hours per day, maybe like from 9am to 5 pm I recall ... since I want to get an A in the subjects.

Though I don't know what subjects are considered soft or not, and which ones should I take to apply in the best university's in the world...


(Original post by SmallTownGirl)
It would be hard to self-study a language. Speaking and writing would be a huge issue. Unless you're a native speaker - in which case most unis won't accept an A Level in it.
English is my second language though I spoke english for my whole life. Though how come they won't accept an A level in it?
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UnbreakableDimmy
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No one was questioning the merit of studying French. It's a very good A-level.

However, English Language is the less respected of the two English subjects, and Sociology is ridiculed. History is a Law student's flagship A-level, and if you wish to study English, Literature is the more prudent choice.

As for the advice you've been given; there's some really ****ty advice out there! I was told "Maths is essential to be a doctor", which anyone on TSR can tell you is simply not true.

The people on these forums can frankly outmatch any careers advisor or teacher when it comes to admissions.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by DeanFoley)
No one was questioning the merit of studying French. It's a very good A-level.

However, English Language is the less respected of the two English subjects, and Sociology is ridiculed. History is a Law student's flagship A-level, and if you wish to study English, Literature is the more prudent choice.

As for the advice you've been given; there's some really ****ty advice out there! I was told "Maths is essential to be a doctor", which anyone on TSR can tell you is simply not true.

The people on these forums can frankly outmatch any careers advisor or teacher when it comes to admissions.
Thanks, it seems to me that you got a point, so you think that studying English Lit + French + History is what more or less universities are looking for?

Yes I understand you, but use logic, Math is absolutely not for doctors..
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BlueJoker
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Sorry, but state schools are really not that bad and aren't going to affect your chances of getting in unless you don't work hard...

My state school has about 10 people per year getting accepted into Oxbridge.
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UnbreakableDimmy
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Exactly, Maths isn't essential, I knew it and every other student knows it. But that's the silly advice we're somethimes given!

If you feel confident enough in those subjects, then yes, they are a very good combination for any prospective Law student.

I can't give you much advice on your other questions, though I would like to stick up for the notion of self-study. I rely on it quite heavily. I believe people underestimate how far books and a specification can take you.

Good luck.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by BlueJoker)
Sorry, but state schools are really not that bad and aren't going to affect your chances of getting in unless you don't work hard...

My state school has about 10 people per year getting accepted into Oxbridge.
I am already by the end of my year 12 ... I am not looking to go back to college again, the college I may plan to go to in Oxford tutorial college is considered a COURSE, so you are not put in a class grade, your going to accomplish a course and you are placed in classes with the people that are going to do the same thing thats all.
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BlueJoker
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(Original post by d.luffy)
I am already by the end of my year 12 ... I am not looking to go back to college again, the college I may plan to go to in Oxford tutorial college is considered a COURSE, so you are not put in a class grade, your going to accomplish a course and you are placed in classes with the people that are going to do the same thing thats all.
So change college? You don't have to go private if you can't afford it. :confused:
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username457532
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(Original post by d.luffy)
No, I have already tried state schools for O levels and they are really not helpful. Self study is not a wise thing to do espeically for me, I rather go on with the teacher with the syllabus then anything extra I could do it alone but not self study.

English is my second language though I spoke english for my whole life. Though how come they won't accept an A level in it?
O Levels don't exist anymore. Are you talking about GCSEs or will you be a mature student (not sure what the term is for people doing A Levels)?

Foreign language A Levels are not intended for students who speak that language as their native language. They are supposed to represent a certain amount of learning and skill which you would not have gained if you were fluent already. This is the reason why foreign language A Levels are at a completely different level of knowledge as English literature and language A Levels.
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