How is ATP involved in absorption of glucose? Watch

User12399
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Question: How is ATP involved in absorption of glucose?

Any help please.
0
reply
Meesta
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
not sure, i only know how ATP is involved in glycolysis and following processes
0
reply
Hype en Ecosse
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
I'm not 100% sure on this, someone correct me if I'm wrong.

But I believe glucose is absorbed from the intestine through the use of Active Transport, active transport requires energy, which is provided by the transfer molecule ATP. So ATP supplies the energy needed for active transport to get the glucose from the intestine to the blood stream.
0
reply
Democracy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by User12399)
Question: How is ATP involved in absorption of glucose?

Any help please.
The translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane is ATP dependent.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GLUT4
0
reply
User12399
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by Democracy)
The translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane is ATP dependent.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GLUT4
Huh? A2 Biology. Am I supposed to know this? :s
0
reply
Undulipodia
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
That's beyond any detail you'll need for A2 biology. The article is talking about the transport of glucose in homeostasis (i.e. in response to insulin in adipose/muscle tissues). Is your question referring to the absorption in the GI tract?
0
reply
mathew551
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by User12399)
Question: How is ATP involved in absorption of glucose?

Any help please.
Uptake of glucose (and amino acids) is linked to the active transport of sodium ions.

A coupled sodium-substrate transport carries the substrate glucose from the lumen of the gut into the absorptive epithelial cells of villi. The substrate leaves the cell by facilitated diffusion and enters the plasma of blood capillaries. The sodium-potassium ion pump, which requires ATP to actively transport ions, maintains the sodium gradient essential to the coupled sodium-substrate transport into the cell.

high concentration of sodium ions in the lumen of gut, low conc. in the epithelial cell and a high sodium conc. in the blood capillaries (in mucosa).
2
reply
confuchaz
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by User12399)
Question: How is ATP involved in absorption of glucose?

Any help please.
adrenaline and glucagon hormones can activate glycogenolysis, thus releasing glucose which is then used by cells. this is useful especially in flight/fight situations etc..

the hormone binds to a cells receptor, activating the enzyme adenylate cyclase

adenylate cyclase converts atp to a chemical signal called cAMP (cyclic amp), which is known as a secondary messenger.

the cAMP activates a cascade in the cell resulting in glyconolysis.


i don't know what exam board you are, but this is the closest we get to glucose absorbtion, GLUT4 is way above what you need to know.

hope this helps.
1
reply
Chwirkytheappleboy
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
This is the answer you're looking for:

(Original post by mathew551)
Uptake of glucose (and amino acids) is linked to the active transport of sodium ions.

A coupled sodium-substrate transport carries the substrate glucose from the lumen of the gut into the absorptive epithelial cells of villi. The substrate leaves the cell by facilitated diffusion and enters the plasma of blood capillaries. The sodium-potassium ion pump, which requires ATP to actively transport ions, maintains the sodium gradient essential to the coupled sodium-substrate transport into the cell.

high concentration of sodium ions in the lumen of gut, low conc. in the epithelial cell and a high sodium conc. in the blood capillaries (in mucosa).
Regarding GLUT4 - it's not part of the absorption process because it's not expressed on enterocytes. It's a transport protein which is used to allow fat and muscle cells to use glucose (rather than Fatty Acids) as a fuel in the fed state - i.e. after glucose has already been absorbed by the intestine. Furthermore, its mechanism is facilitated diffusion, rather than active transport
0
reply
Cinamon
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
isn't the whole point of glucose absorption to make ATP?
0
reply
Chwirkytheappleboy
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by Cinamon)
isn't the whole point of glucose absorption to make ATP?
I costs money to make money unfortunately.

Glucose is absorbed by secondary active transport (i.e. using the sodium gradient setup by primary active transport which uses ATP) and also ATP is also used in the first 3 steps of the Glycolysis pathway which converts Glucose to Pyruvate. Thankfully however, more ATP is generated in Glycolysis & TCA Cycle than is used in procuring the necessary substrates
0
reply
Cinamon
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
I costs money to make money unfortunately.

Glucose is absorbed by secondary active transport (i.e. using the sodium gradient setup by primary active transport which uses ATP) and also ATP is also used in the first 3 steps of the Glycolysis pathway which converts Glucose to Pyruvate. Thankfully however, more ATP is generated in Glycolysis & TCA Cycle than is used in procuring the necessary substrates
ah thanks
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19
  • University of East Anglia
    Could you inspire the next generation? Find out more about becoming a Primary teacher with UEA… Postgraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19
  • Anglia Ruskin University
    Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care; Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Business and Law; Science and Engineering Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (553)
37.82%
No - but I will (115)
7.87%
No - I don't want to (103)
7.05%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (691)
47.26%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise