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    (Original post by Ronove)
    I met a girl at Trinity who sure as hell thought she'd got one. Her brother was there, a 6th year, and she was so absolutely sure she'd get in. It made me feel quite sick. Some of the first years I talked to thought she was a bit of an idiot too though, so it's not just me!
    I knew a girl like that - she was all, 'I applied to the college my grandfather did law at,' and she was irritatingly confident. And she got an offer...it was SO ANNOYING.

    Subject English
    College Trinity

    It went surprisingly well and I quite enjoyed it...but this is actually making me more worried, since I've heard a lot of times that it's usually the people who don't think theirs went well that get in! Oh dear.

    I had a group practical criticism sesh with Dr Henry, who was lovely (but seemed a little unimpressed with the entire group, though that may have been my imagination)...I think I compared fairly well with the rest ofthe group. I then had an interview with Professor Poole who was very friendly indeed, and it was much less intimidating than previous interviews because we were sat opposite each other at a table.

    He asked me to define some difficult words, and that didn't go -too- badly, though I also wasn't that concise or impressive. Then there was a poem which he just asked for general comments on, and some discussion about my A Level texts and what I'd been reading recently. I was surprised by how much he asked about my interests in Art and Music - he was clearly an art fan, as he knew about Manet and Degas. He even asked what my favourite pre-1900 painting was, which surprised me as it felt as though he were testing me! He also asked about the poetry I've written, as it was on my personal statement.

    Altogether, there's not really anything I wish I hadn't said - but there's quite a bit I wish I had said. I really really want a place so all I can do is wait with fingers crossed!
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    I actually feel quite a lot better now that I'm not the only one who thinks I haven't got a place and am basically waiting for rejection. I'm sure with all of us, like some people have said, we're just remembering the bad parts and not the good bits. I do think as well the the first interview is meant to be easier to relax you a bit and the second really difficult to see how you cope. They kept reassuring me that if I needed time to think about something that it didn't matter. I guess it's not a problem if they have to prompt you. Some parts of my second interview were nice and easy and then some bits were just so difficult I'm sure I've messed up.

    And it's so annoying that I can think of so many things I could have said and completely forgot to when I was asked about them. I suppose it's the pressure and the fact that I spent half of the time while I was thinking about answers thinking 'I've totally messed this up, fix it, fix it, ahh!' or something similar.

    The whole experience told me that I would love it there even though it's difficult, that challenges are what keeps me interested in the subject and that I just have to hope that came across in amongst the silly things I came out with! Also, look on the bright side - at least if we're all resigned to the fact that we're getting rejected and our new year is going to start with a feeling of worthlessness, if any of us do get an offer it will be even better than if we were expecting it. I wish I believed my own optimism
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    i had my mml at caius yesterday.. it seemed to go ok, both of my interviewers were really friendly and said they didn't want to make going to an interview any harder. Both of my interviewers asked some of the same questions... and not just the 'why do you want to study french' ones, which i found a bit strange. Overall it went ok but i was expecting to do terribly, so anything was going to be better than that!
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    After both of my interviews I felt like I could have said more!!!
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    Yeah: do you think they'll take kindly to a "Corrections and clarifications" letter?
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    (Original post by Jangliss)
    Yeah: do you think they'll take kindly to a "Corrections and clarifications" letter?
    Ditto.
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    I suppose I should stop lurking on here and chip in a bit. I had my English interviews on Tuesday at Sidney Sussex. I did a test at 1 where I had to write a critical appraisal (I can't even spell it, that bodes well!) of a poem. It wasn't too bad, though I did have a huge coughing and sneezing fit at the beginning so someone had to run out and get me tissues. And there was this huge painting of this smug looking man laughing at me not being able to do it.

    After that I went and got my poem since my letter told me I had to pick it up at 1:55. My interview wasn't until 4:55 so I thought this was a jolly long time but nonetheless, I did as I was told. Turns out I shouldn't have had it until 3:55 but the porter gave it to me regardless and it took me hours to figure out why my envelope said 3:55 on it.

    The first interview was ok, they were so nice that I actually quite enjoyed it. I got into the waiting room to find a girl sitting there crying which scared me rather a lot and then I got called in. There were two people rather than one which also unnerved me but they were so nice that I felt rather guilty about spending the whole time ignoring whoever wasn't talking to me. It was the way the chair was positioned, ok?! They asked me what I'd been reading, talked a bit about King Lear though I didn't have much to say and then on Othello. He was trying to get me to say something in particular but I don't think I ever quite got there. I was also asked about Wordsworth and Twelfth Night, lots of Shakespeare. I enjoyed it but thinking about it I really don't think I did very well at all. I hardly spoke only to say that I'd enjoyed something...

    The second interview was running late so I had to sit and wait for 40 minutes which was pretty unnerving too. The light was on a timer and it kept going off but the girl who had been crying was waiting to go before me and her dad was there so he kept me company. I went in and the older guy who did most of the interview took my coat and hung it up. I had to shake hands which was quite scary since my hands were all sweaty but alas, I hadn't actually taken my gloves off until about 2 minutes before I went in. The interviewer asked me straight away which bit of the poem I was strugging with (although quite a bit less explicitely) and then spent the whole interview grilling me on that one sentence. At one point he said I was totally guessing (too damn right I was and I bet he would have been too if he was me). It was hard and I came out feeling totally exhausted but I think I coped better than I thought I would. At the time I thought I'd done ok but now I've been sat pondering over it for a few days I really don't think it was ok anymore! Hopefully I'm just remembering the bad things.

    Oh and then, as I was leaving, he forgot to give me my coat back so I had to ask for it. There seemed to be quite a few on the hangers so I think he'd been doing a roaring trade throughout the day. I also proceeded to get lost trying to leave the building and thought I was going to have to go back up and interrupt the next interview asking for directions. Fortunately my mum was waiting in a room somewhere and knew where she'd dropped me off so she came running to find me like Annika Rice.
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    (Original post by Rose_Greenthumb)
    I just couldn't connect a church to a barn
    Maybe he was alluding to one of two things: a) Jesus was born in a stable or b) many barns were tithe barns which were for farmers to make their contribution to the church. Still, I haven't read the poem...
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    NatSci (Physical)
    Trinity College

    I didn't do my best at the test (2 correct answers and 2 questions partly done and with some mistakes).
    At the interview we discussed my silly mistakes (I managed to correct them almost immediately) and with some help I finished the other 2 questions. Throughout the interview I felt quite confident coz I managed to answer every question they asked correctly and thoroughly (I believe), although once it did take 20secs for me to make an elementary math transformation . I did get lots of positive feedback though, like "that's a good approach" and things like that. So after it I thought I must have been quite impressive and I'd surely get an offer.
    Now I'm not so confident anymore, mainly because virtually everyone I asked said their interview had been wonderful, and anyway I could have done better at the test.

    At the end of my interview (after I said I didn't have any questions for them) one of them said something like "look around in Cambridge while you're" and "if you have any questions about admission just write an e-mail". Could that actually mean something?! Or is this just something they say to everyone?

    :confused: I think I'm more worried now than I'd been before the interview! Could a performance like this be enough for something??
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    (Original post by NobodyElse)
    The first 20~23 minutes, of half an hour, were spent on this poem. As I clearly didn't have a blind clue what the piece was about, this portion was taken up with the interviewers trying to put me on the right path:
    Interviewer: So, what do you think x in line y of stanza z means?
    Me: Well, I think that it means this, which relates to the poem's overall theme of that...
    Interviewer: Yes, but don't you think that such-and-such in the second stanza suggests so-and-so instead?
    Me: Um... yes! Yes, it does!
    That's exactly what I did; I tried to make quick assumptions and then realised I was completely wrong :rolleyes: I expect it's quite common!
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    Had my English interviews at Corpus Christi today...think they went OK but don't like to speculate!
    The Test was what I expected, a comparison of two poems, both about tombstones...I think I messed that up a little bit, spent too much time annotating and planning and not enough actually writing but I got a few ideas down so it's not the end of the world I guess, I spent more time on one poem than another but that often happens anyway.
    First interview, with the admissions tutor and the college chaplain went quite well. We discussed what I liked about English which led onto a conversation about the importance of context and if one person's view of a text can ever be 'better' than another's. I found that very interesting and although it was challening I enjoyed it- I also managed to link what I was saying to some things I'd read which I think they liked. Then I had to discuss an extract from a short story they'd given me which again was alright, I don't think I was anything special on it but I got through. But where I didn't do so well was when they asked me about my Blake essay, they wanted me to talk more about the Songs Of Innocence and although I'd read them, I had to explain that we hadn't studied very much Blake yet and that we hadn't even recieved our copies of the texts yet...so they didn't push me too much on it, which I think is bad- I just couldn't remember much on Blake at all!
    The second interview was better I think, had two poems to look at, not in comparison but one in reference to structure and style wheras the other was more about meaning- it was a Yeats poem. First we talked about my school and I explained some of the problems we'd be having recently, not having a history teacher etc. Then he asked me about my extra reading- Marvell and cummings which I didn't shine on but I got by. Then he really grilled me on my Shakespeare coursework from A/S- couldn't remember the play as well as I would have liked but we had a fairly good conversation. Then we spent some time talking about the poems, especially the Yeats and as we were talking, I felt that my ideas were develping and that I could start to piece it together- I was really pleased with that as I've heard that's what they like- the ability to think as you're talking and for your ideas to progress. And at the end of the interview he said 'good,' which I suppose is a positive, though certainly not an indication of the outcome!
    But...having said that, the other candidates all seemed really good and I'm still trying to prepare myself for a rejection -I enjoyed the interviews actually even if I was very, very nervous, I especially enjoyed my time with the DoS...The interview process really makes you want a place!
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    Off topic but you get to see OK GO! That's so unfair!
    *retreats back to her hiding place*
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    (Original post by Aired)
    College: St John's
    Course: Natural Sciences (biological)
    How was it?: My general interview went well, the interviewer seemed really nice and we basically just chatted about sport, lol. The subject interview didn't go so well. I didn't get asked anything about biochemistry (which I was hoping I would - it's my favorite part of biology...), I mainly got asked about physiology. There was also a question about flower colour in plants.

    Overall, I don't think I did that well. I'm not expecting to get an offer if I'm honest.


    Yes they were annoying like that werent they ---- not asking any questions youd expect ,,, just random,, and not much a chance to argue which i was looking forward to!!!
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    Course: Law
    College: Selwyn
    How it went: I really couldn't say. The general interview was weird; I felt as if there wasn't enough time to put myself across at my best, and we talked about some pretty weird and random topics: illegal downloading of music, whether The Times is better than The Guardian and why, what value can be gained from comment and editorial pieces in the 'broadsheets', as well as the usual topics - quite a lot to do with my personal statement. He asked me what I'd gained from shadowing a criminal barrister, participating in moots/mock trials etc, how I think I'm suited to studying law and how easy or difficult it was for me to choose that particular subject to study at uni. I don't feel as if I answered the questions to my full potential, and I often found myself stuck for a word or phrase that fit what I wanted to say.

    The law-specific interview went much better, in my opinion, though what that means for my chances, who can say? I had to collect a passage 20 mins before the interview, which was 5 sections from the 1988 Criminal Damages Act. In the interview, Professor S (who started off quite reservedly and wouldn't make eye contact for about the first five minutes, before he seemed to loosen up) put some fictitious scenarios to me and asked whether the person in question would be guilty of a criminal offence under the Act and if so, under what sections. These were really hard and I asked for some extra time to consider each question whilst reading the Act if I needed it. After I'd answered each one (there were three or four), he said, "Good", or "Correct", and one time he said, "You got that one right too, if you wanted to know." That freaked me out a little bit, as I couldn't stop thinking about the fact that it seems that only the people who thought that their interviews went awfully that got in. Then, Mrs O explained a bit about the difference between verbal and written contracts, and that for buying property or land a written contract is needed, whilst when buying goods in a shop, a verbal (and implicit) one will suffice. She asked me why this might be the case; I found this hard, and she prompted me quite a lot on this. Then she developed a fictitious scenario about someone who verbally promises their niece a house, but in reality leaves it in her will to Battersea Dogs' Home. I then had to argue who should get the house and why, and this was also difficult. The interview was 30 minutes and it flew past - it was incredibly enjoyable, although I doubt that will count for anything. Just have to play the waiting game now I suppose *eek*
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    (Original post by Aquila)
    After both of my interviews I felt like I could have said more!!!
    my sentiments exactly
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    (Original post by popop124)
    Yes they were annoying like that werent they ---- not asking any questions youd expect ,,, just random,, and not much a chance to argue which i was looking forward to!!!
    At one point in my subject interview I was asked to close my eyes and point to where in the room one of the interviewers was shaking a baby's rattle, and to explain how I did it :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by *Bethany*)
    aw thanks for being so encouraging! That's true... although they probably thought I'd done it on my French course when in fact we don't study French lit. I remember Dr Lynch assuming I'd done More's 'Utopia' for my history course, and Donne for English. Actually there were parts of my interviews that I really enjoyed, but I keep remembering the parts when I said really stupid things!! & brought up Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress', which was one of my interviewer's favourite poems, and made it clear I didn't really know anything about it... oops!
    It was the written test that really scared me :eek: At that point, I was so tired I just couldn't think at all. Normally in English, I start writing a maximum of 5 mins after I get the paper. This time I was sat there for about 20 minutes trying not to fall asleep before I even started...
    I just feel that I needed to really impress them at interview to stand a chance, because I doubt there were many people with lower grades than me, and I don't think I did enough. Still, it was a great experience and I'd've done it just because it's expanded my reading and knowledge so much Best of luck to you, with your grades, intelligence, enthusiasm and incredible time management skills they'd be insane to turn you down
    Hey (Harriet the sheepdog waves to all the lovely Newnham applicants...) Bethany - please don't worry about your grades, I didn't exactly get stunning A level results and everything worked out very well. There are honestly people who apply with 5 As and get rejected. They are looking at whether you have the potential to be imaginative and think critically and originally, not at whether you can jump through A level hoops.

    Very Best of Luck!
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    (Original post by grumballcake)
    Maybe he was alluding to one of two things: a) Jesus was born in a stable or b) many barns were tithe barns which were for farmers to make their contribution to the church. Still, I haven't read the poem...
    I did think about the Jesus business but he was actually getting at the fact that they both have beams on the ceilings. Apparently. Can't say I've ever been in a church with beams and I've never been in a barn so there we go!
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    I don't know if it's the stress of the past few days or if the waiting is getting to me already, but I'm hating this. Had a nosebleed in class yesterday and a really bad stomach last night, and earlier today my heart started racing really fast and I got dizzy and nearly fainted (and I was just sitting down, hadn't gotten up for at least an hour), thought I was about to have a heart attack. I just want to know. It could be either, I've been almost convinced at times that I'll be rejected, and other times I'd have said it's more likely to be an offer, my interviews were just so... strange. Three weeks of fun fun fun ahead...
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    College: Robinson
    Course: Engineering
    How was it? Alright actually. The general interview was a nice comfortable chat, and thankfully the questions were quite specific so I always had something to say. The maths/physics test they gave me wasn't too bad, with the exception of some "Estimate using your general knowledge" questions which I was given no data for at all. Then it was my subject interview, which was actually quite pleasant as the interviewers were very friendly.

    All in all, not too stressful at all really.
 
 
 
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