What mountain bike should I get TSR ? Watch

george-liverpool94
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I need it for driving to college to get to college there is roads but also need to go off roading on it aswell, both the same price and i really dont know much about bikes so cant decide :confused: Oh and i need it to be light aswell i hate heavy bikes ! the spec is 13.41kg is that heavy ? but i cant find the weight for the GT

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/...24136#features



http://www.sunsetmtb.co.uk/shop/inde...ategory_id=146


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Broderss
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I wouldn't get it anything. It's ungrateful and doesn't deserve a new mountain bike.

The bottom one looks cooler though.
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sil3nt_cha0s
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You're getting a mountain bike for my cousin, Thomas Stephen Robertson? :blush:


I vote bottom one too.
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george-liverpool94
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(Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
You're getting a mountain bike for my cousin, Thomas Stephen Robertson? :blush:



(Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
I vote bottom one too.
Yer i like the bottom one to for looks but would like someone who know's bikes to tell me which is best
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tface
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(Original post by george-liverpool94)




Yer i like the bottom one to for looks but would like someone who know's bikes to tell me which is best
My Dad used to have the better version of the GT (1.0), at the time it was hugely well rated (£500 btw) by magazines etc, and that was a great bike for the price. Specialized Hardrock is a very popular bike, but nothing special and some people say they are overrated/overpriced, not sure myself though. If I were you I would look to spend £500 to get a nice bike, less than that and you are getting a pretty **** fork and cable disk brakes. If you want, look at biking websites or buy yourself a mountain biking mag (What Mountain Bike or MBUK are the ones I prefer).

Wait until DH-Biker gets here and delivers his expert opinion, hopefully he will be along at some point
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mc1000
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(Original post by george-liverpool94)
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I need it for driving to college to get to college there is roads but also need to go off roading on it aswell, both the same price and i really dont know much about bikes so cant decide :confused: Oh and i need it to be light aswell i hate heavy bikes ! the spec is 13.41kg is that heavy ? but i cant find the weight for the GT

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/...24136#features



http://www.sunsetmtb.co.uk/shop/inde...ategory_id=146


Thanks
I reccommend you get the GT.

I ride an 2009 Avalanche 2.0; Cost me just under £500. Can't go wrong with it; and from what I've heard, that tends to be true of GT across the board.

Then again, I've never ridden a Specialized, so for all I know that might be even better. But my general view of Specialized is that - although they're a good manufacturer - their products tend to be overpriced for what you get.

So, overall, I'd definitely say the GT.
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george-liverpool94
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(Original post by tface)
My Dad used to have the better version of the GT (1.0), at the time it was hugely well rated (£500 btw) by magazines etc, and that was a great bike for the price. Specialized Hardrock is a very popular bike, but nothing special and some people say they are overrated/overpriced, not sure myself though. If I were you I would look to spend £500 to get a nice bike, less than that and you are getting a pretty **** fork and cable disk brakes. If you want, look at biking websites or buy yourself a mountain biking mag (What Mountain Bike or MBUK are the ones I prefer).

Wait until DH-Biker gets here and delivers his expert opinion, hopefully he will be along at some point
I'm pushing it at 400 tbh as i say ill probably only use it a couple of times a week and probably only less off road and im not a big bike expert/fanatic so little differences probably wouldn't bother me aslong as it's light looks good has disks and the capability to do abit of off roading and looks that'll do me so im probably gunna go for the GT after what everyones said, also if anyone knows any other bikes for around 400 please post em
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yituool
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Get the cheapest one they have in Halfords. Then people won't steal it, they will just mutilate it and leave it strewn across the courtyard.

Good times.
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f00ddude
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(Original post by george-liverpool94)




Yer i like the bottom one to for looks but would like someone who know's bikes to tell me which is best
hardrock all the way!!
the GT is a bit heavier and they are rarely as good value or as reliable as specialized
GT aren't worth considering unless your spending over 1k

take them for a test ride and ill almost garentee youll feel more comfortable on the hardrock, the hardrock is also a fair bit lighter id estimate the GT to be around 1.5kg heavier

ive worked in a bike shop for 3 years and the hardrock series have got to be the best bikes under 500
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george-liverpool94
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(Original post by f00ddude)
hardrock all the way!!
the GT is a bit heavier and they are rarely as good value or as reliable as specialized
GT aren't worth considering unless your spending over 1k

take them for a test ride and ill almost garentee youll feel more comfortable on the hardrock, the hardrock is also a fair bit lighter id estimate the GT to be around 1.5kg heavier

ive worked in a bike shop for 3 years and the hardrock series have got to be the best bikes under 500
Just when i was nearly decided on the GT ha!, i cant find the wieght for the GT but i dont want anything over 14kg

Which would you say looked better black or white?

Oh and a wierd question im 6ft2 what size do you think i'd need
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f00ddude
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(Original post by george-liverpool94)
Just when i was nearly decided on the GT ha!, i cant find the wieght for the GT but i dont want anything over 14kg

Which would you say looked better black or white?

Oh and a wierd question im 6ft2 what size do you think i'd need
lol, the GT is a good frame but its not any good unless your only going to use it only for off road really, for commuting and offroad mixture the hardrocks the nicest to ride

the GT is deffinatley over 14kg, the frame is a lot heavier than the hardrocks and has heavier tyres by bout 200grams each (may not sound a lot but tyres are where you really feel the difference)

can't say about the colour tbh, thats all personal preference
6ft 2s normally a xl frame, (21 inches) but im 6ft2 and all my bikes are 19inches but thats just cos i like a really agile bike

if your near an evans cycles they do a test ride policy, you can go into the store or call them up and order the 2 bikes in (£50 refundable deposit per bike) and then when they are in you just need to take a card to leave behind and some photo ID, this allows you to take the bike for around 15mins to see which one you feel more comfotable on
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Motorbiker
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Tbh i have no idea and would just be basing them on how cool they look

(Original post by DH-Biker)
Bike related question
Yo dawg, off road bicycling question for you here...
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DeeWave
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I can vouch that the Hardrock is an excellent bike - anyone saying it's overpriced clearly hasn't used one. I've ridden a Hardrock Sport for 4 years now: it's very capable off road, and hardly anything ever goes wrong despite covering a lot of distance. And if you inflate the tyres well and stiffen the suspension, it's pretty brisk on road as well. I'd highly recommend it.
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DH-Biker
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Yeah! Another biking thread! :woo: Cheers for inviting me, Horman!

Well, my friend, the Hardrock is one of the most successful offroad bikes there's been in years. Cheap, extremely reliable, easy to take apart, easy to maintain, parts are cheap and its a nice, simple, cheap and cheerful bike. I can take one apart blindfolded, and I've seen people who've been bike mechanics for a day take them apart, so you'll be able too.
Secondly, the Sport model obviously has discs; now they aren't fantastic, but they definitely stop. You're looking at 60mm rotors, with enough power to drag your back wheel and buck you if you power-down the front. So you'll do fine there.
The suspension is good; its a cheap brand, but it doesn't need much maintenance and they are easy to take apart when they do. Just remove the bottom clip, tap it with a hammer and the rods will become loose and allow the housings to fall away under them.

In regards to the GT; GT bikes are only really worth it when you get into the higher percentile. They are good bikes, but with certain parts they are just too mid-key. Yeah, they are slightly better then the Hardrock's in some cases, but with more high spec parts comes more cost. Again, this bike is easy to take apart, very reliable and extremely worth it, but when it comes to its parts, replacing them is a nightmare and taking apart the hubs and suspension requires some serious mechanical knowledge.
The suspension has more travel, and the disc brakes are slightly better. However the frame is less solid, the drive train is MUCH worse and the rims/hubs are terrible compared.

I would solidly suggest the Hardrock. If you ever need to know how to take one apart, shout out and I'll instruct you through it. Like I said, the Hardrock is a superb bike, and I used one as my bike for years before I hit the beasts on my profile page. You wont be able to do serious, SERIOUS off road with it; like large jumps, drops (we're talking in excess of 15ft here, though, which I don't know if you do anyway?); so again, lovely bike, fantastic to ride, it rides like a dream and its a terrific bike for an all-round purpose. Get it bought. :yep:

Oh, and in addition about weight:

I can pick up the Hardrock with my little finger. Its weightless.
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Arturo Bandini
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(Original post by DH-Biker)
Yeah! Another biking thread! :woo: Cheers for inviting me, Horman!

Well, my friend, the Hardrock is one of the most successful offroad bikes there's been in years. Cheap, extremely reliable, easy to take apart, easy to maintain, parts are cheap and its a nice, simple, cheap and cheerful bike. I can take one apart blindfolded, and I've seen people who've been bike mechanics for a day take them apart, so you'll be able too.
Secondly, the Sport model obviously has discs; now they aren't fantastic, but they definitely stop. You're looking at 60mm rotors, with enough power to drag your back wheel and buck you if you power-down the front. So you'll do fine there.
The suspension is good; its a cheap brand, but it doesn't need much maintenance and they are easy to take apart when they do. Just remove the bottom clip, tap it with a hammer and the rods will become loose and allow the housings to fall away under them.

In regards to the GT; GT bikes are only really worth it when you get into the higher percentile. They are good bikes, but with certain parts they are just too mid-key. Yeah, they are slightly better then the Hardrock's in some cases, but with more high spec parts comes more cost. Again, this bike is easy to take apart, very reliable and extremely worth it, but when it comes to its parts, replacing them is a nightmare and taking apart the hubs and suspension requires some serious mechanical knowledge.
The suspension has more travel, and the disc brakes are slightly better. However the frame is less solid, the drive train is MUCH worse and the rims/hubs are terrible compared.

I would solidly suggest the Hardrock. If you ever need to know how to take one apart, shout out and I'll instruct you through it. Like I said, the Hardrock is a superb bike, and I used one as my bike for years before I hit the beasts on my profile page. You wont be able to do serious, SERIOUS off road with it; like large jumps, drops (we're talking in excess of 15ft here, though, which I don't know if you do anyway?); so again, lovely bike, fantastic to ride, it rides like a dream and its a terrific bike for an all-round purpose. Get it bought. :yep:

Oh, and in addition about weight:

I can pick up the Hardrock with my little finger. Its weightless.


I've got a question for you, if you would be so kind?

I've been repeatedly getting a puncture in my back wheel inner tube, and it's always in the same place. What happens is, I replace the tube, I fit it so that the valve sticks straight the hole in the rim, perpendicular to the rim and all is good for a few days.

As I cycle around the inner tube must be shifting becase the valve starts pointing more and more of an angle from the rim. And then the inner tube splits at the base of the valve, from rubbing against the sharp metal of the hole.

I hope that makes sense?

So I was looking into it and realised that there's no wheel rim tape in this wheel. Would that be why the inner tube is moving around? Because I couldn't find a link between those two things when I loooked it up, everybody just said wheel rim tape was to stop the spoke joinings from causing a puncture.

But my front wheel has it and the tube never shifts.

Thanks!
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DH-Biker
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(Original post by Arturo Bandini)
I've got a question for you, if you would be so kind?

I've been repeatedly getting a puncture in my back wheel inner tube, and it's always in the same place. What happens is, I replace the tube, I fit it so that the valve sticks straight the hole in the rim, perpendicular to the rim and all is good for a few days.

As I cycle around the inner tube must be shifting becase the valve starts pointing more and more of an angle from the rim. And then the inner tube splits at the base of the valve, from rubbing against the sharp metal of the hole.

I hope that makes sense?

So I was looking into it and realised that there's no wheel rim tape in this wheel. Would that be why the inner tube is moving around? Because I couldn't find a link between those two things when I loooked it up, everybody just said wheel rim tape was to stop the spoke joinings from causing a puncture.

But my front wheel has it and the tube never shifts.

Thanks!
It is potentially to do with the lack of friction caused by there being no tape. Its not a hard job to fix, but there are three things you can do:

By some tape; It costs about a fiver for two rim's worth of it. It does stop spoke-connection nipples being a mini-spear and ruining rides, and this is its primary purpose, but it does create a friction pad to stop movement. And to stop water coming into the rim too.

By a larger inner-tube; Costs about £5 again. Possibly an alternative.

Go tubeless. This is what I do with my Trek, my Lapierre and my Scott; It works well, and you fill the inner-tube with this gel and it packs up holes when they are created almost instantaneously. It costs a lot for the gel, but it lasts for months before it starts to "crisp" and then you just clean the tube and boom.

Its more for DH rigs, that, though. With large chunky tires. But its not unheard of in smaller tire-width bikes. It is more effort, but the pressure in the tires prevents punctures. I've had my Trek since just after Christmas, and its had tubeless since, and never had a puncture; similarly, with the new Lapierre and the upgrade from tubes to tubeless on the Scott; never had one.

But, if you want to retain the wheels with tubes; Grab some tape for £5, job done mate.
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Arturo Bandini
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(Original post by DH-Biker)
It is potentially to do with the lack of friction caused by there being no tape. Its not a hard job to fix, but there are three things you can do:

By some tape; It costs about a fiver for two rim's worth of it. It does stop spoke-connection nipples being a mini-spear and ruining rides, and this is its primary purpose, but it does create a friction pad to stop movement. And to stop water coming into the rim too.

By a larger inner-tube; Costs about £5 again. Possibly an alternative.

Go tubeless. This is what I do with my Trek, my Lapierre and my Scott; It works well, and you fill the inner-tube with this gel and it packs up holes when they are created almost instantaneously. It costs a lot for the gel, but it lasts for months before it starts to "crisp" and then you just clean the tube and boom.

Its more for DH rigs, that, though. With large chunky tires. But its not unheard of in smaller tire-width bikes. It is more effort, but the pressure in the tires prevents punctures. I've had my Trek since just after Christmas, and its had tubeless since, and never had a puncture; similarly, with the new Lapierre and the upgrade from tubes to tubeless on the Scott; never had one.

But, if you want to retain the wheels with tubes; Grab some tape for £5, job done mate.
Okay thanks. I think going tubeless is a bit much of an expense/effort for me right now but it's something I can think about in future cheers.
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sleekchic
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(Original post by DH-Biker)
It is potentially to do with the lack of friction caused by there being no tape. Its not a hard job to fix, but there are three things you can do:

By some tape; It costs about a fiver for two rim's worth of it. It does stop spoke-connection nipples being a mini-spear and ruining rides, and this is its primary purpose, but it does create a friction pad to stop movement. And to stop water coming into the rim too.

By a larger inner-tube; Costs about £5 again. Possibly an alternative.

Go tubeless. This is what I do with my Trek, my Lapierre and my Scott; It works well, and you fill the inner-tube with this gel and it packs up holes when they are created almost instantaneously. It costs a lot for the gel, but it lasts for months before it starts to "crisp" and then you just clean the tube and boom.

Its more for DH rigs, that, though. With large chunky tires. But its not unheard of in smaller tire-width bikes. It is more effort, but the pressure in the tires prevents punctures. I've had my Trek since just after Christmas, and its had tubeless since, and never had a puncture; similarly, with the new Lapierre and the upgrade from tubes to tubeless on the Scott; never had one.

But, if you want to retain the wheels with tubes; Grab some tape for £5, job done mate.
I also have a question. Hope you don't mind.

I'm thinking of getting a bike over summer although it's been at least 10 years since I last rode/owned a bike so I don't really know where to start in terms of type/cost/where to buy it.

I'd rather not spend a lot so around £100 but again I don't know what I should be looking for and how much I should budget towards it. I don't really care if it's used.
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tface
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(Original post by sleekchic)
I also have a question. Hope you don't mind.

I'm thinking of getting a bike over summer although it's been at least 10 years since I last rode/owned a bike so I don't really know where to start in terms of type/cost/where to buy it.

I'd rather not spend a lot so around £100 but again I don't know what I should be looking for and how much I should budget towards it. I don't really care if it's used.
DH-Biker knows a lot more than I do but I am fairly sure he will tell you that £100 is not enough to spend on a bike, not by a long way!
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llamalad200
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skip those two and buy a cannondale sl 5 trail 2010 version! they are now £400 new in some places. they were £550 new but i would go with the specialized. they have a good reputation. the problem with the cannondale is the pedals - rubbish! but you can replace those for peanuts so it's not so much of an issue. you do get a life time guarantee with the cannondale frame, and 5 years for the forks. so they're a good investment.

plus available in red and white!
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