Paying Rent to Parents Watch

harveyjakes
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Thank you.
0
reply
member398873
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
£100 is a bit steep.

My parents wouldn't ask for any money, but if they did it would be in the form of buying a few bags of groceries for the week and making sure I pull my weight around the house.
0
reply
chinaberry
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
My dad said they wouldn't ask for anything as long as I was in education. He was shocked that I asked. Might be kind of weird if I was doing a PhD at 26 or so and still not paying anything though, never having had a real job (i.e. not in a shop for a few hours a week). If I needed to move back in and I wasn't at uni, it would be more of a "contribution" than anything else my parents are nice!
0
reply
screenager2004
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
Similar threads to these are made every week: generally the response is that it's normal for kids to pay rent to their parents (although £100 a week is quite steep, but not unheard of).

I would ask your parents to spread that payment over the holidays to make it a bit more manageable for you - so even though you owe them £600, you only pay £40 per week (or however it works out) over the summer holidays rather than £100 a week for the first six weeks.

Inevitably there's going to be an argument on this thread where middle class kids go "Omg how abhorrent, my parents would never charge me rent" but for many families it is a normal part of life. I too paid rent to my parents and to be honest, you owe them so much for their love, care, clothing, food and shelter over the last 18 years, it's the least you could do to contribute to the household over the summer now you're an adult.
0
reply
MancStudent098
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
Seems a little harsh, it's not exactly like you're coming home because you dropped out of uni or want to hang around smoking dope. That said they're stumping up for food presumably as well as leccy, heating, water and sacrificing some of their peace and privacy for 6 weeks. Also you do have the option of staying at Uni if you don't like the deal.
0
reply
TheSownRose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
So you're paying rent twice (uni accommodation and parents)?
0
reply
Clip
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
I see no harm in negotiating. I think you could get them down to £50.
0
reply
MancStudent098
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by screenager2004)
you owe them so much for their love, care, clothing, food and shelter over the last 18 years, it's the least you could do to contribute to the household over the summer now you're an adult.
While I think paying rent to your parents, as an adult, is very reasonable, it does annoy me a bit when people claim that children 'owe' their parents for looking after them. It was their choice to pop a kid into the world, they did it for their own selfish reasons, I think looking after said child until it can earn a decent wage is the least they can do in return.
1
reply
xoxAngel_Kxox
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by harveyjakes)
I also pay my ironing bills.
You know, ironing really isn't that difficult if you want to save some cash

Maybe you could agree with your parents to sit down and work out your share of the bills and shopping and work out a fair amount.
0
reply
screenager2004
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by MancStudent098)
While I think paying rent to your parents, as an adult, is very reasonable, it does annoy me a bit when people claim that children 'owe' their parents for looking after them. It was their choice to pop a kid into the world, they did it for their own selfish reasons, I think looking after said child until it can earn a decent wage is the least they can do in return.
This is not always the case. You can't assume all pregnancies were planned and that the parents are always wealthy enough to support a child comfortably. Or perhaps the parents were financially capable of raising a kid but then fell on hard times etc.

There are many reasons why the child owe their parents. My mum was 19 when she conceived me. It's a miracle I was not aborted really. I do owe her my life in more than one sense.

Yes the parents should support the child until it earns a wage - this is when they are 18. After the age of 18 you should pay rent. You're an adult.
0
reply
MancStudent098
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by screenager2004)
I do owe her my life in more than one sense.
If you retrospectively think it was a good decision for your mother to give birth to you that's lovely. However I don't think you can really owe her anything, including your life, given that you obviously didn't ask for it in the first place. That situation is true irrespective of whether you were planned/unplanned or had poor/wealthy parents.
0
reply
screenager2004
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#12
Report 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by MancStudent098)
If you retrospectively think it was a good decision for your mother to give birth to you that's lovely. However I don't think you can really owe her anything, including your life, given that you obviously didn't ask for it in the first place. That situation is true irrespective of whether you were planned/unplanned or had poor/wealthy parents.
Do you think that you shouldn't be grateful of something if you didn't ask for it then?
That seems a bit bizarre. If your partner surprised you with a romantic weekend in Rome would you have no obligation to feel grateful for it because you never asked for it?
0
reply
MissNel
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
(Original post by screenager2004)
Do you think that you shouldn't be grateful of something if you didn't ask for it then?
That seems a bit bizarre. If your partner surprised you with a romantic weekend in Rome would you have no obligation to feel grateful for it because you never asked for it?
surely you can be grateful for omething but this is not the same as 'owing' that person for it. To the OP yes you should pay rent imo but £100 is a bit steep.I'm on a gap year and pay £100 a month. My mum set a low amount because she knows I'm saving for uni. I'm also expected to help around the house and cook when my mum is working late.
And yes, as someone else said, why on earth would you have an ironing bill?
0
reply
Steevee
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report 7 years ago
#14
Ahh well. £100 seems a bit steep, but if you're parents are paying for the insurance on the car, it seems fair. But if you can barter them down a bit
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (129)
38.62%
No - but I will (19)
5.69%
No - I don't want to (25)
7.49%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (161)
48.2%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise