accommodation guarantor Watch

aemilia
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#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
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i was planning on moving in with a few friends for my second year of uni. we found a great house and everything, and were literally signing papers when a problem came up with my guarantor. turns out to be a guarantor, a person needs to earn more than 12000 a year, but my guarantor, my dad, earns a lot less than that. i dont know what to do, because i really need to move in with my friends, but there is no way i can find another garantor, as i dont know anyone who would sign up for that.

does anyone know what i can do? or is there anyway i can work around the guarantor thing?? HELPPP
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PonchoKid
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that usually doesnt matter, just put him down anyway :/
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studentfinannceguru
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im presuming here, but if you have other family members that earn more than £12k they should be able to be your guarantor??
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hypocriticaljap
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guarantors usually have to be householders.
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aemilia
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(Original post by studentfinannceguru)
im presuming here, but if you have other family members that earn more than £12k they should be able to be your guarantor??
thata the problem, i dont have any other family members who earn that much money:s
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Chr0n
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Why not talk with the landlord and see if you can get around thta problem?
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-honeybee-
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Are they actually going to check? If not, just put him down anyway. I always thought your guarantor needed to be a householder?
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aemilia
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(Original post by -honeybee-)
Are they actually going to check? If not, just put him down anyway. I always thought your guarantor needed to be a householder?
well the guy at the estate agent said he needs to be earning more than 12k after he looked at my form. but my dad owns the house he lives in now, so will that be ok instead do you think?
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-honeybee-
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(Original post by aemilia)
well the guy at the estate agent said he needs to be earning more than 12k after he looked at my form. but my dad owns the house he lives in now, so will that be ok instead do you think?
I don't know, you'd have to speak to the agent. He may reconsider if he knows your dad owns his own house. Did you have to write your dad's income on the form? Did the agent ask for proof? If you just have to give an estimate with no proof I don't see the harm in putting £13000. Although that could be a little obvious...
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aemilia
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(Original post by -honeybee-)
Did you have to write your dad's income on the form? Did the agent ask for proof? If you just have to give an estimate with no proof I don't see the harm in putting £13000. Although that could be a little obvious...
yes, and i wrote his actual income, and then he said it needed to be more, so he saw it. plus they would be sent off for credit checks, so if did write that he earned more, he could have got into trouble no?
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-honeybee-
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(Original post by aemilia)
yes, and i wrote his actual income, and then he said it needed to be more, so he saw it. plus they would be sent off for credit checks, so if did write that he earned more, he could have got into trouble no?
Yeah bad plan. Well all you can do is talk to the agent or ask another relative. Maybe get your dad to ask them so they know it's official and they won't actually be paying your rent.
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shouldbeshot
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Often if the guarantor is a houseowner that suffices, my grandma is my guarantor for this year and she doesnt earn a living, well she has a pension but its the fact that she owns two houses thats the important part
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hypocriticaljap
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#13
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having a house should suffice. The bottom line is if you default the landlord can chase a guarantor with assets. There'd be no point having a guarantor with no way of paying up!
One further thing. Check the contract carefully and refuse a clause that makes you separately and individually liable for all the rent. It is a standard try on by landlords and if you sign it you agree to pay the rent of snyone who drops out. I have always insisted the landlord remove it and my guarator only guarantees me.
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