Please vote on Thursday! Watch

gradjobplease
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#1
Regardless of your politics or lack of politics, I urge you to go the polls on Thursday and express your preference both in the voting referendum and in the local elections if your area is holding them.

Personally, I will always have more respect for a strong supporter of an opposing political platform, even if I find their views abhorrent. To me it is one of the our most fundamental responsibilities as citizens to show interest in both the composition and how our Government is operated.

And before you say you don't have a voice, I personally believe groups who vote heavily do have more of a say in how the Government is run. I'm very much of the belief that the elderly did well out of the cuts i.e. Many universal benefits such as free bus passes remain, mainly because they tend to vote more often than other age groups. The young meanwhile, tend to be less engaged, and consequently have been hit hard particularly on tuition fees.

*Disclaimer, I'm a Lib Dem supporter and will vote Yes in the AV referendum*
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FloydRix
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#2
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#2
I'll be voting No.
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aarora
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#3
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#3
I wish I could vote, I'd so be voting NO.
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Sazzle4
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#4
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#4
I'll be voting yes. Funnily enough, the leaflets I've had on why I should vote 'no' actually really convinced me that 'yes' was the way to go!
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notastampcollector
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(Original post by Milky Milk)
I don't know what to vote at all..

Conservatives say 'No' and Labour say 'Yes'. I read a leaflet that was opposed and I was more lineant to it, but I have no clue personally...
There are quite a few Labour politicians opposed to AV. Lib Dems all support it though.
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SirMasterKey
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#6
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I'll be voting. Personally I feel if I don't go to the ballots, I have no right at all in complaining about the way the council/government are working. Even if they aren't who I vote in, I still feel I have a greater entitlement to complain than someone who doesn't vote and complains. If there is noone you want to vote then spoil the ballot as it is still 'counted' in the voting figures. By this you can be expresses your belief that noone was there that you wanted.
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theseeker
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#7
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#7
Vote NO!!
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Martyn*
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#8
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#8
I'll be drawing a huge pyramid on my ballot with the words "Novus Ordo Seclorum" scrolled across it.
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sicarius1992
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(Original post by SirMasterKey)
I'll be voting. Personally I feel if I don't go to the ballots, I have no right at all in complaining about the way the council/government are working. Even if they aren't who I vote in, I still feel I have a greater entitlement to complain than someone who doesn't vote and complains. If there is noone you want to vote then spoil the ballot as it is still 'counted' in the voting figures. By this you can be expresses your belief that noone was there that you wanted.
Something for you to ponder perhaps?

"I have solved this political dilemma in a very direct way: I don't vote. On Election Day, I stay home. I firmly believe that if you vote, you have no right to complain. Now, some people like to twist that around. They say, 'If you don't vote, you have no right to complain,' but where's the logic in that? If you vote, and you elect dishonest, incompetent politicians, and they get into office and screw everything up, you are responsible for what they have done. You voted them in. You caused the problem. You have no right to complain. I, on the other hand, who did not vote -- who did not even leave the house on Election Day -- am in no way responsible for that these politicians have done and have every right to complain about the mess that you created." George Carlin

And for the record, I do vote. But I do see what good ol' George is getting at.
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cvqw1278
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#10
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#10
I'll be voting NO.

If your first choice party loses - why should this entitle you to another vote? i.e. using your 2nd preference?
It's obsurd, also I'm not sure why some PR advocats are championing AV, it is a further move from PR and also means the voting sysyem won't be reformed for a long time again!
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Alex-92
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#11
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(Original post by Sazzle4)
I'll be voting yes. Funnily enough, the leaflets I've had on why I should vote 'no' actually really convinced me that 'yes' was the way to go!
Just this. Me and my family were all convinced on voting NO for this whole shabaz, until a leaflet wielding tory turned up at my door this morning. Pretty disgusted by the leaflet tbh. Definitely going to vote YES along with my family, if only for the fallacies on the leaflet.
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Rascacielos
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#12
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#12
If I were 18, I'd be voting No.
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TurtlesRun7
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#13
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#13
Voting yes! Thought the no leaflets were appalling. Most of the information was really misleading, especially if you are unaware of the yes argument.
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KissMyArtichoke
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#14
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#14
Probably voting yes, although I haven't been able to convince my friends. That's if I get to vote at all. I haven't registered but I got a voting slip through the post, so I assume I was registered automatically?
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SirMasterKey
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#15
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(Original post by sicarius1992)
Something for you to ponder perhaps?

"I have solved this political dilemma in a very direct way: I don't vote. On Election Day, I stay home. I firmly believe that if you vote, you have no right to complain. Now, some people like to twist that around. They say, 'If you don't vote, you have no right to complain,' but where's the logic in that? If you vote, and you elect dishonest, incompetent politicians, and they get into office and screw everything up, you are responsible for what they have done. You voted them in. You caused the problem. You have no right to complain. I, on the other hand, who did not vote -- who did not even leave the house on Election Day -- am in no way responsible for that these politicians have done and have every right to complain about the mess that you created." George Carlin

And for the record, I do vote. But I do see what good ol' George is getting at.
He has a good point to be honest, but having only ever voting in the one election and even then to a losing candidate I still feel my way is valid for me. Until I vote for someone that gets in and then if they prove to be dishonest and imcompetent then I'd agree it is my fault. From then I would probably change my voting allegiance to another local candidate that shares similar views to me.
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xnatalie01x
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#16
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#16
I don't know what we're voting for.
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rugbyladosc
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#17
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#17
political participation in this country is laughable. Because of our poor electoral system and low voter turnout only 22% of people actually voted for the previous Labour government.
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TurtlesRun7
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#18
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#18
(Original post by xnatalie01x)
I don't know what we're voting for.
I didn't either until I watched this video:
http://addmysupport.com/guides/the_a...FUEb4QodIBsEqg
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99price
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#19
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(Original post by Milky Milk)
I don't know what to vote at all..

Conservatives say 'No' and Labour say 'Yes'. I read a leaflet that was opposed and I was more lineant to it, but I have no clue personally...
It doesn't really matter wihich way you vote- it is more important that you do actually go out and vote. Since a threshold has been opposed, the electoral system could change if only 3 people actually voted! How unfair would that be! So go and vote!

at least for me...cos i'm only 17
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lessthan0
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#20
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(Original post by sicarius1992)
Something for you to ponder perhaps?

"I have solved this political dilemma in a very direct way: I don't vote. On Election Day, I stay home. I firmly believe that if you vote, you have no right to complain. Now, some people like to twist that around. They say, 'If you don't vote, you have no right to complain,' but where's the logic in that? If you vote, and you elect dishonest, incompetent politicians, and they get into office and screw everything up, you are responsible for what they have done. You voted them in. You caused the problem. You have no right to complain. I, on the other hand, who did not vote -- who did not even leave the house on Election Day -- am in no way responsible for that these politicians have done and have every right to complain about the mess that you created." George Carlin

And for the record, I do vote. But I do see what good ol' George is getting at.
I see his point but I refute it; if you vote FOR someone who promises a lot and delivers little you have every right to complain, because, just like a shampoo that is sold promising to clean your hair but leaves it greasy and dirty, a corrupt politician is not operating "as described"- you have a right to complain.

If you vote for a party and then another is elected and they operate in a way not in agreement with your views then you have a right to complain because you believe that things could be done better and your complaint may provide something to think about which might improve society. Were you to vote and then complain that they were doing things wrong even though they're doing what you voted them in to do, THEN you are in the wrong.

If you go into th polling booth and spoil your vote, then too you are making your voice heard- you are complaining from the outset that your views are not represented at all and that there should be an extended period of debate and thought before power is given to a group who (regardless of who is elected) will in your opinion be inappropriate for the job. You have an extended right to complain.

If however you do not vote at all; if you do not put a mark on the ballot paper, but instead remain ensconced in your armchair, blissfully avoiding all mention of the election then you have absolutely no right to complain- you made a choice to stay silent when asked for your opinion, the government gave you an opportunity to voice your concerns and make a choice so that your views would be represented so that as best as possible you would have an impact on how your world is run. But instead you keep mum. You remain tight lipped, and like a impudent child interrupting a true discussion because you want your way, rather than letting representatives know when they could have built your views into their manifesto so as to best provide for your needs.
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