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BossLady
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#361
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#361
(Original post by PuffDaddy)
HEY!!!!!
My sister read Media along with 4 other A-levels. She got an A and said she'd never worked so hard in her life, so don't knock it.
Well at least Imperial College like it, they accepted her for medicine, so there!!
But...she did 5 a levels so I imagine at least 3 were "academic" ones e.g chem, bio and phys. Had she done media studies, socio and film, do you think they would have accepted her ?:p:p

Anyways all credit to her! Go imp!
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Helenia
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#362
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#362
(Original post by WilliamFoster)
Big deal, you might be taking it but it doesn't mean you're good at it.
I take A-level maths (ok so i was 3 marks off an A but i know i'm reasonable at one of the most difficult A-level subjects).
For the record, I don't take GCSE english as i passed it first time in school, i presume you got an A* since you're being so cocky?
There is only one person around here who is being really cocky...
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madmazda86
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#363
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#363
(Original post by WilliamFoster)
If you are referring to this post, i can't see where you're asking me a question. Ok so i got the pioneers of the different models muddled up, big deal. I mean, if i were to ask you a question on A-level maths i am sure you will have no clue, thats the difference between the two subjects all you need is for your teacher to TELL YOU (against Piaget's theory) who did what and what date it was conducted whereas A-level maths is a whole different cookie, subjects like that require deep understanding and lot of private study.
I wasn't asking you a question. I have no idea where you got that idea from Yes, you did get the pioneers wrong - I pointed that out because you boasted that

A) You supposedly learnt all your bogus information in one taster session
B) You claimed that even though you detested Psychology you "knew all about it" - I subsequently proved you wrong.

I've studied Maths - I know it is difficult. However, Maths also requires you to be taught how to do the methods - you can't teach it to yourself out of a textbook any more than you can do with Psychology, because of the sheer volume of material and the many hundreds of applications. Psychology has a similar volume of material to be learnt as Maths - the advantage with Maths being that you don't have back-to-back exams, unlike Psychology. In Maths you don't have to hold a minimum of 15 key studies and a dozen (at least) minor ones in your head for EACH of the four topic areas you'd be asked on in the exam.

I found with Maths that it was nothing more than learning more elaborate applications of trigonometry, differentiation, integration, factorisation of bi/polynomials etc. In a way Psychology is similar to Maths - in that the basic theories you learn have to be applied to many different situations with the classic interlinkage of topic material as well as the application of learned knowledge to unknown situations.

For example, integration can be applied to the areas of volume of revolution as well as logarithms and the reversal of differentiations. Differentiations can be applied to mechanical relationships, chain rule etc. Psychological approaches can be used to explain wrongful court convictions, why brain damaged patients can remember how to walk to the bus stop from their house but not what Kat Slater did on EastEnders just three minutes ago, and many other everyday phenomena. In Psychology you also gain the valuable skill of scientific appraisal and evaluation, as well as flexibility. Maths is a lot more black and white than Psychology is - there's a solution, and there's proof, and that's it. Psychology is much more fascinating because there *is* more than one explanation for why something happens, and you have to look at all the merits, factors and flaws in each theory before deciding which one would have the most relevant application.

In Maths, you have the satisfaction of solving a difficult problem. In Psychology, you have the satisfaction of identifying the underlying causes of the problem and using those to bring about a solution.
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WilliamFoster
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#364
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#364
(Original post by madmazda86)
I wasn't asking you a question. I have no idea where you got that idea from Yes, you did get the pioneers wrong - I pointed that out because you boasted that

A) You supposedly learnt all your bogus information in one taster session
B) You claimed that even though you detested Psychology you "knew all about it" - I subsequently proved you wrong.

I've studied Maths - I know it is difficult. However, Maths also requires you to be taught how to do the methods - you can't teach it to yourself out of a textbook any more than you can do with Psychology, because of the sheer volume of material and the many hundreds of applications. Psychology has a similar volume of material to be learnt as Maths - the advantage with Maths being that you don't have back-to-back exams, unlike Psychology. In Maths you don't have to hold a minimum of 15 key studies and a dozen (at least) minor ones in your head for EACH of the four topic areas you'd be asked on in the exam.

I found with Maths that it was nothing more than learning more elaborate applications of trigonometry, differentiation, integration, factorisation of bi/polynomials etc. In a way Psychology is similar to Maths - in that the basic theories you learn have to be applied to many different situations with the classic interlinkage of topic material as well as the application of learned knowledge to unknown situations.

For example, integration can be applied to the areas of volume of revolution as well as logarithms and the reversal of differentiations. Differentiations can be applied to mechanical relationships, chain rule etc. Psychological approaches can be used to explain wrongful court convictions, why brain damaged patients can remember how to walk to the bus stop from their house but not what Kat Slater did on EastEnders just three minutes ago, and many other everyday phenomena. In Psychology you also gain the valuable skill of scientific appraisal and evaluation, as well as flexibility. Maths is a lot more black and white than Psychology is - there's a solution, and there's proof, and that's it. Psychology is much more fascinating because there *is* more than one explanation for why something happens, and you have to look at all the merits, factors and flaws in each theory before deciding which one would have the most relevant application.


Wow, i'm impressed but you can never convince me that psychology requires even 1/50th of the academic rigour required for maths.
Common you know fine well that if you pick up the booklets they give you and actually read it through, remember case studies and who carried them out then you will in no doubt get an A. In maths you may revise endlessly on certain areas such as logarithms, but due to the vast range of different questions you may be asked on a particultar topic it is very easy to be caught out. Yes, you need to know the basics and apply it BUT it is much much more easier said than done and i'm sure many mathematicians will agree with me there.

In Maths, you have the satisfaction of solving a difficult problem. In Psychology, you have the satisfaction of identifying the underlying causes of the problem and using those to bring about a solution.
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winorloose
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#365
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#365
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Maths A level 2002/03
No of A grades awarded: 19,903
%age of candidates achieving A grades: 39%

Media A level 2002/03
No of A grades awarded: 2,282
%age of candidates achieving A grades: 12%

Tell me again which is "the most difficult A level" a which subject has "too many people walking out with A's".

Source: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/...41/tab007a.xls
That does seem suggestive doesn't it? Though always remember 'Lies, damn lies and statistics!'
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J.S.
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#366
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#366
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Maths A level 2002/03
No of A grades awarded: 19,903
%age of candidates achieving A grades: 39%

Media A level 2002/03
No of A grades awarded: 2,282
%age of candidates achieving A grades: 12%

Tell me again which is "the most difficult A level" a which subject has "too many people walking out with A's".

Source: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/...41/tab007a.xls

If a subject is popular at some middle class independent, it's difficult. If it's confined to FE colleges, it's by definition easy and serves no use to society whatsoever.

Cmon, that's all we need to know PQ, we don't need stats on this, we're British....just read the Sun to confirm prejudices.
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llama boy
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#367
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#367
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
(ps I'm waiting for the counter argument of "only clever people take maths and only idiots take media")
much as i dislike the prejudice exhibited by many in this thread...that doesn't strike me as entirely untrue.

then again, i'm sure it is provable one way or the other, by virtue of the GCSE entry grades for each A level. figures, PQ?
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suz19
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#368
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#368
(Original post by WilliamFoster)
Big deal, you might be taking it but it doesn't mean you're good at it.
I take A-level maths (ok so i was 3 marks off an A but i know i'm reasonable at one of the most difficult A-level subjects).
For the record, I don't take GCSE english as i passed it first time in school, i presume you got an A* since you're being so cocky?
Excuse me, Mr Arrogant, I was replying to nextadamsmith's post. He responded to my post with comments about GCSE Eng Lit so I was just saying that I was talking about A Level. What is your problem? Why do you come onto these sort of sites when you clearly don't have the mental ability to read what other people have to say and process it properly??!
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George-W-Duck
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#369
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#369
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Or is it just that some subjects the criteria needed for marks are more easily defined and so more easily achievable - with maths you're either right or wrong, with media studies it's the arguements, evidence and

(edited to say - don't have those entry grade stats I'm afraid)
I dont think it really is the sace for maths, like all subjects you learn concepts and if u make a mistake, the ECF from that mistake will pick you up the majority of the marks just like i assume in media if u explain a concept with slight errors u wont lose the entire marks.
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CaSTle OUtsiDeR
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#370
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#370
(Original post by WilliamFoster)
Big deal, you might be taking it but it doesn't mean you're good at it.
I take A-level maths (ok so i was 3 marks off an A but i know i'm reasonable at one of the most difficult A-level subjects).
For the record, I don't take GCSE english as i passed it first time in school, i presume you got an A* since you're being so cocky?
oh just shut your face there are so many people in the country taking A-level maths and it simply doesn't make you special in any sort of way...besides there is a rather large % of candidates getting A....obviously not including you because you are just too cool for school yea ?
'Big deal, you might be taking it but it doesn't mean you're good at it.'
big deal, you doing maths.
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fishpaste
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#371
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#371
AS Maths is surprisingly easy, A2 maths gets quite difficult, but considering pure 1 is just things like quadratics, and a very basic introduction to calculus, stats1 is like the statistics GCSE with more algebra, and mechanics 1 is really easy again, if you do physics.
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madmazda86
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#372
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#372
(Original post by WilliamFoster)
Wow, i'm impressed but you can never convince me that psychology requires even 1/50th of the academic rigour required for maths.
Common you know fine well that if you pick up the booklets they give you and actually read it through, remember case studies and who carried them out then you will in no doubt get an A. In maths you may revise endlessly on certain areas such as logarithms, but due to the vast range of different questions you may be asked on a particultar topic it is very easy to be caught out. Yes, you need to know the basics and apply it BUT it is much much more easier said than done and i'm sure many mathematicians will agree with me there.
I agree, it most definitely is easier said than done - I used to spend three hours at a time on Maths homework and I had to work pretty damn hard to get my B on the AS-Level. Logarithms are okay, but modulus was quite simply beyond me because I could never remember how to solve them when it was an inequality rather than modulus = modulus (I'm a factorising girl - I don't *do* inequalities ) Fortunately the hardest question on the P2 paper last year was on volume of revolution so that did me fine!

If one is able to memorise Psychology case studies it's all very well - but the dates don't even matter, it's the content which does. For every major key study there's aims, procedures and findings (which include percentages and the number of participants in the study which you *have* to be able to quote - and when it's things like cross-cultural variations in attachment and you have to remember the percentage proportions of secure, insecure-avoidant and insecure-anxious attachment types for SEVEN different countries, it gets a bit frustrating!).

You also have to be able to evaluate all the key studies presented *and* be able to remember the findings of the research that supports these evaluations! In addition to this you have to be able to structure essays based on these studies (plus any relevant minor ones) and analyse them in depth in order to receive full marks. The difficulty is increased in that the essays can be on *anything*, even topic areas that aren't attached to a key study, hence you have to remember twenty or so minor studies to be able to cope with questions like that.

Psychology truly is a science because there are so many topic areas that you have to draw from or bring together - that central dogma which is vital to all sciences from Biology to Quantum Physics to Veterinary Science A teacher can't tell you what to expect on the paper, but if you study hard and know your topics then you won't have a great deal of difficulty just like in Maths - you know you're going to have to do some integration *somewhere* on the paper because there's so many areas that use it.

P.S. What booklets?! We don't get any booklets - all I have is my textbook, my teacher and my highlighter pen
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winorloose
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#373
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#373
(Original post by madmazda86)
I agree, it most definitely is easier said than done - I used to spend three hours at a time on Maths homework and I had to work pretty damn hard to get my B on the AS-Level. Logarithms are okay, but modulus was quite simply beyond me because I could never remember how to solve them when it was an inequality rather than modulus = modulus (I'm a factorising girl - I don't *do* inequalities ) Fortunately the hardest question on the P2 paper last year was on volume of revolution so that did me fine!

If one is able to memorise Psychology case studies it's all very well - but the dates don't even matter, it's the content which does. For every major key study there's aims, procedures and findings (which include percentages and the number of participants in the study which you *have* to be able to quote - and when it's things like cross-cultural variations in attachment and you have to remember the percentage proportions of secure, insecure-avoidant and insecure-anxious attachment types for SEVEN different countries, it gets a bit frustrating!).

You also have to be able to evaluate all the key studies presented *and* be able to remember the findings of the research that supports these evaluations! In addition to this you have to be able to structure essays based on these studies (plus any relevant minor ones) and analyse them in depth in order to receive full marks. The difficulty is increased in that the essays can be on *anything*, even topic areas that aren't attached to a key study, hence you have to remember twenty or so minor studies to be able to cope with questions like that.

Psychology truly is a science because there are so many topic areas that you have to draw from or bring together - that central dogma which is vital to all sciences from Biology to Quantum Physics to Veterinary Science A teacher can't tell you what to expect on the paper, but if you study hard and know your topics then you won't have a great deal of difficulty just like in Maths - you know you're going to have to do some integration *somewhere* on the paper because there's so many areas that use it.

P.S. What booklets?! We don't get any booklets - all I have is my textbook, my teacher and my highlighter pen
Strictly speaking Psychology is not a true science because it does not have the same empirical structure as a 'hard science' such as chemistry or physics. Psychology (as far as i can see it) is based around postulates which cannot quite be proven experimentally (because everyone is different), unlike physics, where there certain laws (like gravity) which are hard and fast, and can be and have been proven using different experiments.
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George-W-Duck
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#374
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#374
(Original post by winorloose)
Strictly speaking Psychology is not a true science because it does not have the same empirical structure as a 'hard science' such as chemistry or physics. Psychology (as far as i can see it) is based around postulates which cannot quite be proven experimentally (because everyone is different), unlike physics, where there certain laws (like gravity) which are hard and fast, and can be and have been proven using different experiments.
That is possibly the most well worded and accurate post ive seen for a long time, i have spent many hours trying to convince sociology and psychology studying friends these things!
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winorloose
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#375
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#375
(Original post by George-W-Duck)
That is possibly the most well worded and accurate post ive seen for a long time, i have spent many hours trying to convince sociology and psychology studying friends these things!
I don't have to. My cousin is doing experimental psychology at cambridge and my elder brother psychology and sociology at leicester...I just eavesdroop off their conversations!
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WilliamFoster
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#376
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#376
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Maths A level 2002/03
No of A grades awarded: 19,903
%age of candidates achieving A grades: 39%

Media A level 2002/03
No of A grades awarded: 2,282
%age of candidates achieving A grades: 12%

Tell me again which is "the most difficult A level" a which subject has "too many people walking out with A's".

Source: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/...41/tab007a.xls

Edit and while we're at it Psychology has a 17% A grade pass rate.
It takes balls to do A-level maths and people who take media (in many cases) would never think of taking maths. The reason why the pass rate for media is lower is because many people walk into over confident because their dyslexic older brother managed to get an A, so they don't even try hence their low marks.
LOL, why the hell am i even waisting my time to compare maths and media, two extremes of academic rigour.
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winorloose
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#377
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#377
(Original post by WilliamFoster)
It takes balls to do A-level maths and people who take media (in many cases) would never think of taking maths. The reason why the pass rate for media is lower is because many people walk into over confident because their dyslexic older brother managed to get an A, so they don't even try hence their low marks.
LOL, why the hell am i even waisting my time to compare maths and media, two extremes of academic rigour.
Don't take the piss out of people for being dyslexic. Up to 40% of dyslexics end up as self made millionares. I don't think the rest of the population can claim that.
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fishpaste
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#378
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#378
(Original post by WilliamFoster)
It takes balls to do A-level maths and people who take media (in many cases) would never think of taking maths. The reason why the pass rate for media is lower is because many people walk into over confident because their dyslexic older brother managed to get an A, so they don't even try hence their low marks.
LOL, why the hell am i even waisting my time to compare maths and media, two extremes of academic rigour.
You're deluded about how hard maths is.
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George-W-Duck
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#379
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#379
(Original post by winorloose)
Don't take the piss out of people for being dyslexic. Up to 40% of dyslexics end up as self made millionares. I don't think the rest of the population can claim that.
A harsh joke but i guess its cos they have the ability to see things differently...
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winorloose
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#380
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#380
(Original post by George-W-Duck)
A harsh joke but i guess its cos they have the ability to see things differently...
Its not a joke. Just because someone can't read fast, spell well or are just messy (my handwriting is appalling) doesn't mean they're a muppet. It all evens out in the long run, but people who take the piss are essentially narrow minded. Dyslexics aren't stupid. :mad:
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