The road of wealth, to foster knowledge Watch

TheEntertainer
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Hi folks,

Choosing a career only for its monetary benefits can often result in a life of boredom and dissatisfaction. Unless you figure out a way to gain fun in what you're doing, ethically and non-ethically, it is unadvisable.

However, in a human world that rotates due to economic force, certain objectives in life do require wealth. Sometimes you may see this burden taken away by the status you were born in or the financial aid you get.
But the latter can always be very narrow.

Especially in European universities.

So why not first establish a financial basement from which you can jump into the best palaces of knowledge?

e.g. enter world of business, [hopefully] get rich, study physics at Oxbridge.

I know that life is short and we cannot do many things at once, but if there's interest, and the objectives are clear, wouldn't it be a safe path towards accessing any university you want? Even as a "mature student"?

I don't know whether others, too, have considered this path, but in my personal circumstances (my interest towards serious study + financial burden), it seems to be almost the "only option".

What do you think of this?
What other means of careers with immediate financial security (apart from the eternally common business) do you suggest?
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Shake 'n Bake
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Law that's why I am doing it and hopefully I will get in
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kalen
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Get rich --> study physics at Oxbridge (or any other top uni) is not necessarily correlated (if at all). Now, be a strong candidate --> study physics at Oxbridge is directly correlated. You don't get into a uni for your money (one name: Euan Blair).

As to how to avoid being in debt at the end of your studies, I think it's pretty difficult, unless you've got savings and such. Most well paid jobs require a university education, so it's not like you can graduate from high school and become a business man. I'm not in debt thanks god, my parents are not rich but my mom's always been great at managing the familiy's finances and they managed to send me through uni. But even if they couldn't have helped me I wouldn't care less about being in debt as long as I have a good education, which, as I've said in another thread, is worth more than money.
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Alan Smithee
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How the hell did Prince Charles get into Cambridge then?
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TheEntertainer
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Now, be a strong candidate --> study physics at Oxbridge is directly correlated. You don't get into a uni for your money (one name: Euan Blair).
You're absolutely right and I'm even ashamed because I once used to tell that, too (education > money).

Sure, but what if, despite all talent you have, you may not get the hardship assistance you require?
In my specific case it's slightly more complicated since I'm not living in the U.K (BUT in the E.U.) (and I've had some... personal issues that unfortunately had their effect on my last schoolyear. I don't think I can discuss about these things with admission officers...)

But apart from that topic, back to the "self-financing contingency plan": Do you think it's "sustainable", with having career, etc.?
Can you have a GOOD money-incoming career that also allows you the time to study later?

And anyway, if your last highschool year went bad, is there another way to prove yourself to be a strong candidate, after having secured a career in a totally different field?
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kalen
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(Original post by TheEntertainer)
You're absolutely right and I'm even ashamed because I once used to tell that, too (education > money).

Sure, but what if, despite all talent you have, you may not get the hardship assistance you require?
In my specific case it's slightly more complicated since I'm not living in the U.K (BUT in the E.U.) (and I've had some... personal issues that unfortunately had their effect on my last schoolyear. I don't think I can discuss about these things with admission officers...)

But apart from that topic, back to the "self-financing contingency plan": Do you think it's "sustainable", with having career, etc.?
Can you have a GOOD money-incoming career that also allows you the time to study later?

And anyway, if your last highschool year went bad, is there another way to prove yourself to be a strong candidate, after having secured a career in a totally different field?
I'm not from the UK either and I got the same help UK students get towards fees (being EU means you're Home for fee purposes).

I think it's difficult to find a good-money job with merely high school qualifications. But I think, yes, there are ways of proving yourself to be a strong candidate, but I think it's more up to how good you're at whatever job you're going to get than how much money you'll make. But grades seem to count an awful lot for admission, most people who have bad years in Britain seem to re-sit their exams, take a gap year to do that etc. I don't know if you can do that in Italy, although you might want to consider the option of taking some international exams like A-levels etc. to get some good grades to back you up, if you're a strong candidate who just happened to have a really bad year.

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(Original post by Platocrates)
How the hell did Prince Charles get into Cambridge then?
I don't know the story of Prince Charles so I can't comment on that, but I've heard he's not as stupid as some people make him...
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by kalen)
I don't know the story of Prince Charles so I can't comment on that, but I've heard he's not as stupid as some people make him...
He didn't get anywhere near the grades to get into Cambridge, he was let in because he was royal - however that was a different time - his son had to go through the same selection procedures as any other student.
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TheEntertainer
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Oh... when speaking about career, I really meant going to uni for a "more easy" (easy for me given my current circumstances) subject and start a career in that field.
So not a job right after highschool

Well, my real fields of true interest revolve around neuroscience (psychology, cognitive evolution, brain technology etc. etc.) and I'm really enthusiast about researching in these subjects.

Example of contingency: I could study something business-oriented and work for scientific organizations and thereby may enter the field?
Or I research the connections economics and neurosciences (these are actually topics I ponder about in my daily life :P)?

Hmmm... unluckily we cannot re-sit exams in Italy. Our school system sums up all exam results of the last three semesters and makes the average.
I'm currently finishing the second one but don't expect my marks next semester to alter the average greatly. And application deadline for many UK unis is January.
Very complicated.

I even considered the option of a gap year. But thereby I would start going to university when I'm 21!!! Wouldn't I fall into the category of "mature students"?

International exams? Do you think S.A.T. (the U.S. standardized test) would count?
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kalen
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I'm into cognitive psychology too! When you say enter the field through something business oriented you mean as a cognitive researcher? Because I think it'a bit difficult to get into research in any field without a strong background in that field (it's extremely likely you'd need a PhD in a relevant subject, so, given your interests, psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience or biological sciences). And then you have to take into account that there's no real 'easy' course to get into...it depends on the uni you apply to. And if you're really interested in the topics you mentioned, I think going through a degree that's completely unrelated would be pointless and you might end up not enjoying it at all.

I took a gap year after high school (am from Friuli originally) and started uni at 20, how come would you be starting at 21? I think the SATs could do, although APs (Advanced Placement) seem to be usually better regarded, but I have no clue how you go about to sit those.
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TheEntertainer
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Great, kalen

I hold the view that results of contemporary exploration in the neuro/psychological field, be it cognitive psy, neuroplastics or even brain biotech can change many basic "understandings of the human being" that underlie the ideas expressed in political and economic theory, law and other subjects in the social sciences that are concretely used in the world.

Although this may be viewed as overly philosophical, that's exactly my personal link between the two fields. However, I don't want to imprison myself in too much theory and also use it practically.

Complicated ambitions? :P

So far, I haven't seen any university course that directly addresses this "practical link" between the two (theory could be examined by philosophy, anthropology, etc.), whence I have yet another reason to start in the "easer field".
When I say "easy", I mean easy in my current circumstances. The possibility of successfully applying to some good courses in field of social sciences and my direct background knowledge: Despite my great interest in evolution, DNA and the brain, my school offers no more biology since grade 11! Whereas something in the social field is more directly accessible from my current potential.

I'm finishing school next June and I'll be 20 in October 2006
When I was a child, I had to repeat a year, but ever since I used to be leading in my studies. What happened recently, I have to admit, was a sort of psychological issue, from which I'm now recovering.

You're from Friuli? Where exactly? I may misunderstand that with the Italian region
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