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what do you mean by 'jumping through the hoops' watch

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    the title says it all
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    It's an idiom. If you are prepared to jump through hoops for someone, you are prepared to make great efforts and sacrifices for them.
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    In an academic sense, one of my teachers used to say this meaning 'tick the examiners boxes' ie. you learn exactly what they want to know so you dont beat around the bush. eg. what's on the marking sheet.
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    People often complain that A-levels (and to a greater extent GCSEs) are more about 'jumping through hoops' than intelligence. In other words, you could be the brightest person in your year, but if you don't cover the assessment objectives and do exactly what the examiners are looking for, you won't get the best grades.
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    I messed up my History AS- but I wrote some really intelligent answers.
    I read the exemplar answers and was shocked at their low quality but whoever wrote them got loads more marks than me! GRRRRRR! Makes me sooooo mad!

    After that I struggle to see exams as a good measure of intelligence. All you have to do is jump through the damn hoops!
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    Basically, they're saying that you don't need to be intelligent to pass A-level/GCSE exams, all you need to do is learn the specific answers to specific questions. The questions are the hoops, and you need to learn how to jump through them.
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    (Original post by Icy Ghost)
    It's an idiom. If you are prepared to jump through hoops for someone, you are prepared to make great efforts and sacrifices for them.
    Huh? Perhaps you're mistaking this for, "Bending over backwards"?
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    I took the definition from this site:
    http://www.usingenglish.com/referenc...ugh-hoops.html
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    (Original post by Icy Ghost)
    I took the definition from this site:
    http://www.usingenglish.com/referenc...ugh-hoops.html
    Fair enough. But as far as context is concerned, this doesn't really apply to GCSE/A-level.
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    Probably not, the OP didn't really make it clear tbh.
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    but i dont see how you learn to 'jump through the hoops' because i dont know about you but i've never been told the specific assessment objectives for my exams. also, does anyone know where i can get a copy of the syllabus for exams
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    Go to your examination board websites, they should have a copy of the syllabus and mark schemes.
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    I tried the 'oh, I'm intelligent, of course I can pass exams' route last year and messed up. I got all As overall but lots of my papers were Bs and Cs. It reached the point where my teachers were like, 'Yes, I'm sure you have the ability to get a PhD and write a book eventually, but the fact is you can't meet the 'simple' criteria of this essay' (although maybe they were being sarcastic). Actually, I'm still at that stage.
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    If you log on to your exam board's website, and then look for the qualification you're taking, then you will be able to download lots of material that will help with hoop-jumping.

    The one document that certainly will help is the Specification; take a look at the Assessment Objectives pages and it should be all laid out there for you. It's interesting to see how much the exmainers value each objective - for example, the objective of simply recalling facts may be 30% of the marks, but evaluating different ideas might be worth 40%. In other words, even if you recall thousands of facts in your essay but don't come to an evaluation of which facts are most important, the most marks you can get in that module is 30%.

    Also, some exams have more assessment objectives than others - RS just has two (recall and evaluation), whilst Eng Lit has five (because you have to refer to critics in your answers, etc).

    Depending on your exam board, you may be able to download past papers and their corresponding mark schemes that will tell you exactly how marks are allocated by the assessment objectives. This is helpful, because many exams have a 'format'; i.e. Question 1 on the paper will only ever want facts to be written down (in which case any evaluating comments would be a waste of time), whilst Question 2 will require a longer essay with an evaluation.

    Finally, if you're doing coursework, see if the exam board does coursework reports. I'm just finishing off AS Eng Lit coursework for OCR, and the reports are fantastic for making sure you 'put all the right ingredients' into your essay and really target the marks.

    I've probably failed in *my* objective of trying to make it sound straightforward, but just ask your teacher if you need clarification - they'll be only too pleased your asking because it means you will know what you're doing when it comes to sitting the actual exams. It's as easy as jumping through a few hoops once you've gotten your head round it
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    (Original post by Icy Ghost)
    It's an idiom. If you are prepared to jump through hoops for someone, you are prepared to make great efforts and sacrifices for them.
    lollercoaster.
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    Hehe the phrase "jump through the hoops" is what my history teacher always says, its one of his infamous sayings! Basically in order to do this (ie make your answer fit the requirements of your course specifications - tailor make your answer per question your doing by focusing on structure and the requirements of the question ie: if the question asks "how far did the Bolsheviks consolidate their power by 1922"? then you need to focus on the ways they did that and then focus on the "how far bit".. by doing this, you are effectively jumping through the hoops!) you will need to look at what the question demands and try and answer it by producing a well developed argument and then backing up that argument with historical facts/figures etc
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    I so agree - you don't have to be highly intelligent to pass, just learn what is one the specification and have a good memory! That's not really the case in R.S and D.T though for me
 
 
 

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