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    in alevel maths does edexcel give full marks when the final answer is correct but no working out is present (or the working out is wrong)?

    I've heard that if the final answer is wrong but there is some working out then they give you some marks for the working out hence i wanted to know whether its the same the other way round but this time you get full marks.
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    anyone know the answer?

    you get full marks as long as your not specifically asked to show your workinjg out, but your safer to show your working out. but i'm not 100% sure on that, your teacher will know.

    Yes i *think* all you need is the answer right for full marks, although if anybody is certain can you cofirm this.
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    You need the working out. Getting the answer correct only guarantees you a fraction of the available marks.

    Originally posted by J86enterprises
    You need the working out. Getting the answer correct only guarantees you a fraction of the available marks.
    No i dont think thats the case with edexcel, i've heard there the only board were simply an answer gets you the full marks.
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    i asked my tutor this and here it goes:

    if you get the answer correct with no method shown and to the correct acuracy ie 2 d.p or 3 s.f - full marks

    if you get the answer correct and show a method and to correct accuracy - full marks

    correct answer with or without method but wrong degree of accuracy - i think u drop one mark depending upon total marks avaliable.

    wrong answer, no method - no marks

    wrong answer, correct or partially correct method - marks awarded where possible...

    hope that clears things up!!
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    It depends which module you are doing, the applied modules may need to have method shown to get any marks.

    Your best bet is to show your working out anyway, less likely to go wrong.

    there are some calculators which work out complex equations so using them would you get you full marks without actually doing anything.
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    No, you need workings to show you understand the process.
    They dont accept just the answer for most questions, especially the high mark one's im afraid. I wish they did, its so much easier to do stuff in your head.

    Originally posted by Iluvatar
    No, you need workings to show you understand the process.
    They dont accept just the answer for most questions, especially the high mark one's im afraid. I wish they did, its so much easier to do stuff in your head.
    Your wrong there, EDEXCEL give full marks even if there is no working out.
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    How are you going to get the answers without working them out anyway?

    Dave

    he has the mark scheme
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    Scandal alert then! :eek:

    eassy: assuming a draft 2003 mark scheme hasn't fallen off the back of a lorry, in which case I hope someone goes to prison...

    one reason you will get higher marks if you get into the habit of showing the working properly is that you get method marks (M marks) even if you make e.g. arithmetical errors;

    but the other reasons are that showing the working helps you think about the working better and makes it more likely you'll get the answer right...

    and even if you still make an error, showing the working will make it more likely that you detect the error when you come to read through your answers at the end.

    There are occasionally questions where a certain small error will lose you all the marks, but these are rare. I encountered an example recently, where someone would have lost 4 marks (out of 4 for the question) for plotting two points the wrong way round on a graph, even if they used the right method for finding the gradient etc. after having done so. Unfair really imho.
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    Well there are a couple of mark schemes floating about i heard. But ive checked with EDEXCEL, and you do need working out to get most of the marks.

    But to dave, i can work out even most of the complicated ones, in my head easily.
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    If you don't always get 100% - in which case showing the working won't be a problem - look at why you drop the marks you drop and "working on the working" will probably be useful. After all, whether you show working or not, knowing how to do it is what it's all about. Also trying to show the working clearly helps a "first principle" type of understanding which is useful if you want to go on to be a mathematician. Admittedly it can be a turnoff when examiners or teachers say "you must show your working", but that doesn't make it silly
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    You sound as though you take exams seriously and know your stuff well. If you know of draft mark schemes for future exams floating about, you should report it. You'll probably get a reward!Cheating devalues genuine achievements :mad:

    Anyway most of the work on mark schemes happens after exams are sat!

    The people who write that that you dont need to show method seriously mislead students. I quote from the front page of EDEXCEL maths paper, P1 Jan 2003:
    "You must show sufficient working to make your method clear to the Examiner. Answers without working may gain no credit."

    Regarding the speculation about mark schemes floating about:
    Boards publish mark schemes after the exam results have been published. Centres (i.e. schools/ colleges sitting the exam) get a complimentary copy but people can buy them from the exam board publications departments.
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    Yes but I thought he meant draft mark schemes for future exams -in which case a criminal offence would have been involved. Last year some shysters offering tutorials as an extra got their students to sit the real papers as mocks the evening before the exams - the teacher involved was prosecuted and sent to prison. Getting hold of draft mark schemes before the event would also be useful to cheats, insofar as the mark schemes contain the answers. However, there are many many people who if they heard of this would report it. Mark schemes are only finalised after discussion once the exams have been sat, so the prior availability of drafts would make it even easier to locate any point of leakage. In short - the idea that mark schemes for future exams are floating about would be an urban myth .
    Mark schemes for specimen papers and past sat papers are publicly available, but studying them isn't going to enable someone to write down the answers to questions in future exams without doing the working out That said, they are useful for students to study, to find out for themselves how marks are allocated, and the meaning of terms such as 'method mark', 'follow through', and the rarer 'correct answer only' which only very occasionally accounts for all the marks for a question. So the end of the sermon from me is - show your working, and if you don't know why, find out

    In edexcel a level maths you get a maximum 1 mark per question for the correct final answer.

    Most of the marks throughout the paper are method marks and acuuracy for the correct application and calculations in working.

    I can assure you if you look at any past mark scheme you will receive about 10 - 20 out of 75 maximum on the paper for correct final answers alone

    Besides it is nearly always impossible to solve difficult problems (especially p3 calculus) in your head alone
 
 
 
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