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    Dear all,

    Does anybody know what is the difference between the two options? I hope the latter one doesn't mean applicants can do the test more leisurely because I've already paid for the first one...

    :confused:
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    Nah..the second one is for ppl with disabilities
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    Yep i think its for people with dyslexia
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    (Original post by Sarah_Kiya)
    Yep i think its for people with dyslexia
    ...or other disabilities that render them eligible.
    i know dyslexia's the "trendy" one these days, but...
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    um okay but hey if u've got dyslexia how can u be a lawyer?
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    why not? I'm a medic & a few of my peers are dyslexic...

    it's something people develop coping strategies for & the diagnosis says nothing about their intelligence, just natural abilities in a narrow domain (reading/spelling).

    some examples of well known dyslexics (from the website of the British Dyslexia Association) include:

    Dr Simon Clemmet – At 28 years old was the British Scientist who analysed the carbon compound found in the meteorite from Mars, at Stanford University in California. He was labelled as a slow learner at school until his dyslexia was diagnosed. At the age of 11 he was awarded a grade C for science in a school report, which also said that he showed room for improvement in mathematics. Once he realised he was dyslexic at the age of 12 he flourished and grew in confidence. Even now, he cannot write a letter without the help of his computer spellchecker. He often faxes his scientific papers to his father in England who proof-reads them for spelling mistakes.


    Richard BransonEntrepreneur. "At the age of eight I still couldn't read. I was soon being beaten once or twice a week for doing poor class work or confusing the date of the Battle of Hastings".


    David BaileyPhotographer. "At the age of 59 I have yet to write a letter and still write figures the wrong way round. At school, I was put in the class for the stupid. The British denigrate the visual as something to do at the weekend, not realising that visual people are luckier than verbal people; they are not limited by their vocabulary. And who's to say what's normal? Maybe dyslexics are the clever ones. ….and art isn't one of those things you can teach. It's natural, and, if you're not careful, you can beat it out of someone."


    Mike Drury – An engineer who invented tyre warmers for grand prix cars and now has a £500,000 a year business with 1995 profits at £150,000. His latest order, which is expected to double turnover, is for heated covers for GEC Marconi's air-launched cruise missiles. Other projects range from warmers heating industrial grease at the bottom of a gold mine in Australia to protecting concrete at the top of Mount Fuji in Japan. He is so dyslexic he can't even write a cheque.


    Sophy FisherJournalist, former BBC correspondent to Geneva. "I see children today doing everything I did to try to stop people seeing their failings - disrupting the class, lurking at the back, faking illness, losing homework. Letters on a page appeared a meaningless jumble – with no more logic than alphabet spaghetti. But in my small village school I couldn't really hide the fact that I was the class idiot." She eventually went to Cambridge University.


    A.A. GillJournalist. "My work at school was atrocious. I still remember some of the unkind comments, such as "there's not point in you studying history. You can't even write". To this day he goes to great lengths to compensate for his dyslexia. His articles would be illegible to copytakers so he dictates them instead.


    Hamish GrantChief Executive of Axeon a Technology company. They produce a new type of microprocessor. He suffered numerous nightmares at school. "I forced myself to be good at other things, especially at sport. It taught me later in life not to be nervous of failure and that every problem is a challenge, not an insurmountable obstacle. I have learned to live with dyslexia. I remember my BSc finals in chemical engineering and missing a huge chunk of a question, only for it to 're-appear' on the paper after the exam".


    Guy HandsNomura Bank. One of the most powerful and influential men in the City of London. He is severely dyslexic and had to take the sciences rather than English at school, and was examined verbally for his degree finals. He would have liked to have been a writer or even an actor, but his pronunciation is bad too, so instead he decided to make money.


    Nicholas Negroponte – founder of the Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is described as "undoubtedly the most venerable of all the new-media gurus". His company receives millions of dollars of funding each year from top international companies such as BT, Nike and Compaq. They usually want research on technologies that have a quicker payback. Being profoundly dyslexic has, ironically been something of an aid for him. The digital world rather than the atomic world of paper and print is a godsend. The condition has also made him learn how to stand in front of huge audiences, without the need for notes or prompts or any other support.


    ..so i imagine some of them could have become lawyers had they so wished.
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    richard branson was beaten for doing badly in studies???? thats HARSH! I bet all the people who beat him are now beating themselves for not being nicer to him!
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    Aww I am so sorry I didn't mean to offend. Thank you for enlightening me..

    Those forementioned I will forever held in utmost respect.
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    It never ceases to amaze me how many people don't read the LNAT website before booking. We have had a few numpties who have booked the extended time test when they had no reason at all to do so. When universities get to hear about this, it creates a pretty bad impression. It looks at best careless (you want to be a lawyer but you can't be bothered with terms and conditions?) and at worst dishonest (you want to be a lawyer but you don't think the rules should apply to you)? In one or two cases known to me candidates' admission prospects have been damaged by this.

    Visit http://www.lnat.ac.uk/help/examaccess.html

    This page (linked from the registration gateway page) explains very clearly that the extended time test is ONLY for those with ddyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dysorthographia, or working memory deficit. NOTHING ELSE!
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    (Original post by John Gardner)
    It never ceases to amaze me how many people don't read the LNAT website before booking. We have had a few numpties who have booked the extended time test when they had no reason at all to do so. When universities get to hear about this, it creates a pretty bad impression. It looks at best careless (you want to be a lawyer but you can't be bothered with terms and conditions?) and at worst dishonest (you want to be a lawyer but you don't think the rules should apply to you)? In one or two cases known to me candidates' admission prospects have been damaged by this.

    Visit http://www.lnat.ac.uk/help/examaccess.html

    This page (linked from the registration gateway page) explains very clearly that the extended time test is ONLY for those with ddyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dysorthographia, or working memory deficit. NOTHING ELSE!
    You know, I can't actually remember now, but I'm pretty sure I got extra time and I don't have any of those disabilities.

    Edit: Well I don't think I do... I'm not sure what a few of them mean but they sound like cognative impairments.
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    You know, I can't actually remember now, but I'm pretty sure I got extra time and I don't have any of those disabilities.

    Edit: Well I don't think I do... I'm not sure what a few of them mean but they sound like cognative impairments.

    Ah yes, but you are remembering what life was like under the 2004-5 system!

    For the 2005-6 test we have two different ways of extending the test. For candidates with one of the five conditions listed in my previous post, there is a STANDARD allowance that can be booked 'off the peg' by the candidate, without talking to Pearson.

    For other candidates with examination access requirements (e.g. people with visual or manual impairments) we make special arrangements on a case-by-case basis. Partly in the light of your detailed comments last year, we radically overhauled this part of the service. But obviously it is too complex to allow candidates to book a test off the peg.
 
 
 
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