Relationship between the position of element and charge of it's ion

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Cinamon
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Can somebody please explain/send a link to a web page about the relationship between the position of an element in the periodic table and the charge on it's ion.

Thank you so much in advance
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illusionz
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(Original post by Cinamon)
Can somebody please explain/send a link to a web page about the relationship between the position of an element in the periodic table and the charge on it's ion.

Thank you so much in advance
If it's for A level then this will probably suffice:

Group 1: +1
Group 2: +2
Groups 3-6 don't tend to be involved in ionic bonding, and if they are it has significant covalent character. A couple of exceptions, eg O : -2
Group 7: -1
Group 8: Inert gases

Transition metals have variable valencies so can form several different ions.


As with most things, there are, of course, some exceptions.
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rainbowbex
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(Original post by Cinamon)
Can somebody please explain/send a link to a web page about the relationship between the position of an element in the periodic table and the charge on it's ion.

Thank you so much in advance
The Groups represent how many electron's they'd have to lose to have a complete outer shell/how many electrons they have in their outer shell to be in a neutral state.

Then it's about whether er gaining or losing electrons will give make the molecules most stable. Groups 1-3 tend to lose, I can't remember about 4,5, and 6. Group 7 will tend to gain an electron.

Transition metals vary,
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Cinamon
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(Original post by illusionz)
If it's for A level then this will probably suffice:

Group 1: +1
Group 2: +2
Groups 3-6 don't tend to be involved in ionic bonding, and if they are it has significant covalent character. A couple of exceptions, eg O : -2
Group 7: -1
Group 8: Inert gases

Transition metals have variable valencies so can form several different ions.


As with most things, there are, of course, some exceptions.

(Original post by rainbowbex)
The Groups represent how many electron's they'd have to lose to have a complete outer shell/how many electrons they have in their outer shell to be in a neutral state.

Then it's about whether er gaining or losing electrons will give make the molecules most stable. Groups 1-3 tend to lose, I can't remember about 4,5, and 6. Group 7 will tend to gain an electron.

Transition metals vary,
Sorry I think I meant in terms of ionic radius?
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rainbowbex
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(Original post by Cinamon)
Sorry I think I meant in terms of ionic radius?
The ionic radius is proportional to the charge, and how many electrons it has orbiting, as you go down a group, the radius increases. The more positive a charge it has, the smaller the ionic radius is. so a lithium ion is smaller than a potassium ion.

And a beryllium ion is smaller than a lithium ion.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ionic_radius for a detailed explanation. Though, I really don't understand how you couldn't have googled that yourself.
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Imogenisthebest
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I’m stuck too
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