Maker
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
What do you think is the most versatile degree, the degree that opens the most doors careers wise.

I was think maybe engineering because you can apply to both jobs that are degree independent like the civil service and also apply for jobs requring technical know how.
0
reply
Leo*
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 10 years ago
#2
I would also say engineering. The maths content (according to a lecturer from Liverpool in regards to electrical engineering) is the second most mathematical intense course, second to a Maths degree, and includes vasts amounts of problem solving which will put you in a good position for many career paths.
2
reply
logic123
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 10 years ago
#3
Neuroscience UCL - the amount of scientific journals you have to read through for first year - not to mention we have to do second year modules in our first year - puts us ahead of the game - and DONT say medicine - as the medics in third year cover what we do in first year - so i beg to differ
42
reply
Manitude
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 10 years ago
#4
Probably maths, physics and engineering.
Though all three lack the literary analysis required by degrees like history, law or english lit.
1
reply
Oh my Ms. Coffey
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 10 years ago
#5
(Original post by logic123)
Neuroscience UCL - the amount of scientific journals you have to read through for first year - not to mention we have to do second year modules in our first year - puts us ahead of the game - and DONT say medicine - as the medics in third year cover what we do in first year - so i beg to differ
The question was 'Whats the most versatile degree?' not 'What degree are you doing?'
34
reply
Chazzer66
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#6
Report 10 years ago
#6
Surely a join degree like PPE would be the most versatile??
Having said that I'd have to say history is the best. Source: me
1
reply
logic123
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 10 years ago
#7
and i started my sentence with ''Neuroscience at UCL'' - or can you not read?
3
reply
Steverockin
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 10 years ago
#8
Business? Im Biased though :P
11
reply
MedicalMayhem
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#9
Report 10 years ago
#9
I'm not at university, but maybe something like Economics?

As it involves numbers and graphs which covers (kind of) maths but then has slightly more literary analysis than pure science degrees. So it's kind of versatile in the sense that it's a cross between analysis + interpretations (literary analysis) and like maths/science degrees.
0
reply
RamsFanNo1
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 10 years ago
#10
I was told that Maths is one of the most versatile degree which is one of many reasons why I chose to study it. I do however agree with what Manitude said "all three lack the literary analysis required by degrees like history, law or english lit", even though there is a fair amount of writing which mathemticians have to do at degree level as was said by my lecturer, "a mathematical argument is a piece of coherent text , not just a string of formulas".
I do very much agree that engineering and physics are also very versatile degrees and in fact most degrees can open so many doors for you. There are in fact very few degrees which aren't versatile.
In my opinion the top three most versatile degrees are: Engineering, Maths and Physics
0
reply
michael clayton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 10 years ago
#11
(Original post by MedicalMayhem)
I'm not at university, but maybe something like Economics?

As it involves numbers and graphs which covers (kind of) maths but then has slightly more literary analysis than pure science degrees. So it's kind of versatile in the sense that it's a cross between analysis + interpretations (literary analysis) and like maths/science degrees.
You can go into banking/finance with a science degree but you can't go into science from an economics degree.
5
reply
smellysocks
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 10 years ago
#12
Straight Economics, Maths, Sciences
0
reply
MedicalMayhem
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#13
Report 10 years ago
#13
(Original post by kbountra)
You can go into banking/finance with a science degree but you can't go into science from an economics degree.
Ahh okay sorry, I guess my lack of experience really did show!
2
reply
DopplerEffect
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 10 years ago
#14
Engineering?
0
reply
im so academic
Badges: 15
#15
Report 10 years ago
#15
(Original post by Maker)
What do you think is the most versatile degree, the degree that opens the most doors careers wise.

I was think maybe engineering because you can apply to both jobs that are degree independent like the civil service and also apply for jobs requring technical know how.
I *would* say Engineering, but Physics could allow you to everything an Engineering graduate could do (yes, people with Physics degrees can be engineers), but I feel it would be easier for a Physics grad to do postgraduate mathematics than an engineering grad.
1
reply
Leo*
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#16
Report 10 years ago
#16
(Original post by im so academic)
(yes, people with Physics degrees can be engineers).
However their physics degree will not be accredited by the IET to allow the graduate to later become a Chartered Engineer.

http://www.theiet.org/careers/accred...ccred-list.cfm
0
reply
im so academic
Badges: 15
#17
Report 10 years ago
#17
(Original post by Leo*)
However their physics degree will not be accredited by the IET to allow the graduate to later become a Chartered Engineer.

http://www.theiet.org/careers/accred...ccred-list.cfm
However, it will serve as great preparation to do the MEng as a second degree, so it's not like you would have wasted those 3-4 years doing Physics.

But an MEng Engineering graduate wanting to do a PhD in an area in Pure Mathematics (not applied)?
0
reply
Leo*
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#18
Report 10 years ago
#18
(Original post by im so academic)
However, it will serve as great preparation to do the MEng as a second degree, so it's not like you would have wasted those 3-4 years doing Physics.

But an MEng Engineering graduate wanting to do a PhD in an area in Pure Mathematics (not applied)?
I agree that a Physics graduate may be more suited for a PhD in Pure Mathematics, although, due to the Physics degree not being accredited by the IET, doing an accredited Masters in Engineering (One year masters such as the MSc as opposed to the four year MEng) still may not hit the grade for chartership, although I may be wrong.

However I'm sure exceptions do exist
0
reply
michael clayton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#19
Report 10 years ago
#19
(Original post by MedicalMayhem)
Ahh okay sorry, I guess my lack of experience really did show!
Nah that's ok....Econ is still a great degree to have and it is v. competitive at the top universities. From your username you appear to have quite a clear idea of what you want to do (unless I'm taking it too literally)

EDIT: why has someone negged you?:confused:
2
reply
dumdumdumdidum
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 10 years ago
#20
Joint degree in Maths and History
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (175)
44.3%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (43)
10.89%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (32)
8.1%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (83)
21.01%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (39)
9.87%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (23)
5.82%

Watched Threads

View All